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Thread: RaliVanMinks - Composition 1.1

  1. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpysaur View Post
    You should be really proud of yourself! These are looking pretty great. A couple of things to think about- #7 isn't quite dark enough in the darkest darks. In #8, there could be a few carefully placed lighter areas on his face, to describe the light better. Also, as you work on more of them, think about popping in a few sharp edges here and there at the end, where you see them in the original. Yours look just a wee bit blurry.

    Keep observing your values, edges, and shapes! You are doing well!

    Thank you very much! The things you mention are my main problems, well, have been from the start. I'm a bit unsure as to how much to zoom in when doing the details, without losing trace of the ref. So mostly, I keep it zoomed out and work on it as it is. Will have to figure out another way to approach these studies. The one I just finished is a landscape, but I'm sure the edges may be off again. As for the values, I'll try pushing a bit my darks. And the lights. :o) Thank you very much for the feedback, much appreciated!
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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  3. #28
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    Tried to work under 2 hours - ended up with about 1.5 hrs on this one. Figured I´d do a landscape study this time and focus more on my values and edges, although the end result is again off. I have to remember not getting into the details before I've even built up a solid enough base.

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    I chose this painting of Friedrich because of the atmospheric perspective and the foreground-background contrast. The economy principle dominates in the background in the form of value economy and lost edges, while it's exactly the opposite in the foreground. The eye sort of jumps from front to back with the help of the suggestive vertical unifying the mountaintops. And while it seems inactive, the rhythm of the mountain edges are varied, almost like waves. The overall compositional building block is the triangle, which here unifies and diversifies at the same time, giving the painting depth and inviting the eye to travel through the forms.
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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  4. #29
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    Half way there. This time I tried a bit of a different approach, since my edges are not getting any better. This study I actually enjoyed, even though it demaned a lot of detailing on a relatively small resolution - which might also be another reason why some of the previous studies are off. Will have to figure it out through trial and error.

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    I chose one of Shishkin's amazing tree paintings, because each tree has a character of its own and they all look like majestic lonely giants. Strong verticals anchor the eye to the picture plane and give the illusion of distance, depth and perspective. They also pierce through the horizon line breaking the stabilitiy and balance that one expects from a fairly inactive subject as this one. The eye travels through the canvas following the "S" curve, and taking its time to absorb the scene. There's economy of value in the distant background, while the tree closest to us is detailed and pops out as the main focal point. There is repetition, rhythm and variety that is especially reflected in the trees' foliage and the plain, and balance between each element in the scene, either in terms of value or scale.
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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  5. #30
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    Theres definately a nice improvement to shape accuracy in these last two studies - really noticable.
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  6. #31
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    Awesome job on these last two. Your value control is getting better and better. Great job on the sharpness you achieved in the foreground of #10. If you put a sharpen filter over #9 and #10 I think it would make them even closer.

    I'm a bit unsure as to how much to zoom in when doing the details, without losing trace of the ref. So mostly, I keep it zoomed out and work on it as it is. Will have to figure out another way to approach these studies.
    I think keeping zoomed out for these studies is probably your best bet. What I personally found helpful in my later studies was to lay in everything with those textured brushes, then to achieve sharpness, I went over certain forms and edges with a hard round- size jitter on, but with full opacity and flow. At first it scared me, because it was out of my comfort zone and it looked terrible up close. If I kept it zoomed out, it looked pretty good. It sped up my process a lot, I learned more about choosing the appropriate values, and I think it's appropriate for this type of study. I also used the sharpen tool or sharpen filters sometimes. Just something to think about.

    Honestly, all in all, these are really great.
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  7. #32
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    Thank you Agerkvist!
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpysaur View Post
    Awesome job on these last two. Your value control is getting better and better. Great job on the sharpness you achieved in the foreground of #10. If you put a sharpen filter over #9 and #10 I think it would make them even closer.



    I think keeping zoomed out for these studies is probably your best bet. What I personally found helpful in my later studies was to lay in everything with those textured brushes, then to achieve sharpness, I went over certain forms and edges with a hard round- size jitter on, but with full opacity and flow. At first it scared me, because it was out of my comfort zone and it looked terrible up close. If I kept it zoomed out, it looked pretty good. It sped up my process a lot, I learned more about choosing the appropriate values, and I think it's appropriate for this type of study. I also used the sharpen tool or sharpen filters sometimes. Just something to think about.

    Honestly, all in all, these are really great.

    Thank you so much Grumpy! :o) I´m really glad there is a slight improvement. I will try the sharpen filter and see if it makes it somewhat better. It sounds also time-saving. I really want to get the sharpness with my brushwork though.. just knowing I can do it, makes it better for me to choose later on an easier way. But I will definitely try it out.

    Your suggestion on the brushwork is great. I think the fact I use about 50% fill might be one of the reasons I don't get nearly close to where I should. Out of the comfort zone it is, then. And I'll make sure to try the textured block in (I kind of did that with the trees on #10, erased with a hard eraser brush, but still.. blurry). You're probably right about the appropriate values though, it totally makes sense to get closer to those this way.

    Thank you so much for the tips!! I hope the next ones get closer to accuracy and crispness. :o)))
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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  9. #34
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    Try blocking out the big shapes with a hard 100% opacity brush at first - it looks weird at first, but remember you're only doing that to get the shapes right, you can soften them up later if need be. It's much harder the other way around, at least it is for me. I've tried just blocking in values and shapes real quick with a softer brush, but cleaning up the lines afterwards can be alot of work unless you're really precise to begin with in my experience - which isn't all that great tbh
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  11. #35
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    fabulous job. my only comment is to really double check your edges at the very end as you can go a little soft, like around the trees for example. keep up the great work.

    jm
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  13. #36
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    Thank you Jason and Agerkvist. I hope this time it's a biiiit crispier. Still loads to learn and tons of practice to get where I need, but, it's coming.

    Next study. Have one week off, so will try to wrap things up as from May I'll be dead busy. This one was done entirely with 100% opacity and flow, as kindly suggested by Grumpysaur & Agerkvist, so I hope it's not as blurry this time. I checked the sharpen filter, but it only made some brush strokes a little too sharp.. I think I enjoyed this approach a lot more - less frustration involved, at least in terms of edges. I applied a lighter middle value than I actually should have, but otherwise I think doing that helps to establish a base to work on making it visually easier, at least for me. The body and head *and posture* are a bit off, and there are also some parts that could use a bit more tweaking, but I spent waaaay more time on this one, so I think that is it for now. So here goes:



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    Anna Ancher is one of the Skagen painters, inspired by the Impressionists, and therefore many of their paintings focus on light. This particular painting is beautiful, even though very modest in its theme. There is balance, economy and unity throughout the entire piece. The figure's blouse is the darkest dark broken by her skirt and being followed by the dark shadow on the floor. The other dark that the eye falls on is the door, although it "washes out" at its end. The kitchen counter's right side is in balance with the low left corner, where the groceries lie on the table, which depict a certain rhythm and difference in size, shape and placement, as well as value and repetition. The same goes for the objects on the counter. In terms of light, there's a similar pattern: lights are being balanced out by darker values, hence also giving a certain rhythmic quality to the painting. Economy is present in various places here, including all the objects on the counter and the table, details and the walls, which would otherwise distract interrupt the eye from running its course around the image. After observing the entire piece, eventually the eye exits on the right where the door is ajar, and the lighter wall serves again as a balancing element for the composition.
    Last edited by RaliVanMinks; April 15th, 2014 at 04:50 AM. Reason: typos
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  14. #37
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    You've made amazing progress! This last one is really great. However I see a bit of a scale issue. The table the woman stands in front is wider than in the original. You can spot it especially if you look at the right side of the painting. There's less space between the cabinet (or whatever it is) and the edge of the painting. I also think the woman is at least a bit wider or bigger than in the original...
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  15. #38
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    The woman's cast shadow and table leg could be darker. . . but overall. . . wow! Excellent hard work on those edges. Looks really great!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomasBj View Post
    You've made amazing progress! This last one is really great. However I see a bit of a scale issue. The table the woman stands in front is wider than in the original. You can spot it especially if you look at the right side of the painting. There's less space between the cabinet (or whatever it is) and the edge of the painting. I also think the woman is at least a bit wider or bigger than in the original...
    Thank you for the feedback Tomas! Yes, I notice the difference now. I was so focused on getting the other parts right, that I totally disregarded the left side where the wall is. I could see the figure and there seemed to be a shortage of space on the right side, so I should have been more careful with the big shapes and proportions from the start. Or else, this is what it leads to. Need to keep that in mind. Thanks!


    @Grumpysaur: Thank you! Still not there, but hopefully getting closer with those edges. I notice it now, the shadow. Still need to work on those darkest darks, as I'm off by a value or two. I need to be more bold with those it seems. I will keep it in mind for the next ones.
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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