RaliVanMinks - Composition 1.1

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Thread: RaliVanMinks - Composition 1.1

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    RaliVanMinks - Composition 1.1

    Hello everyone!

    First study after watching the video and going through some possible references.
    Really love the assignment and itīs a huge motivation being able to participate. :o)


    Name:  1MaxParrish_study900.jpg
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    I chose this painting by Maxfield Parrish because of the dramatic lighting, enhanced by the suggestive verticals of the light-source. The vases and round platters next to the figure, placed slightly to the left of the center, appear to support it. Together they form a dynamic triangle, despite the figureīs static (sitting) position. The figure appears to be the main focus, yet combined with the dark background, it suggests the act of hiding. The eye just keeps bouncing from the highly high-valued vase to the feet of the figure, the tilted sword and finally to his face.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Your thoughts on the painting subject matter are enlightening. Overall you have done a great job hitting all your big values and the overall value range. you need to keep working on hitting proportion of the main figure as if that was just a bit better you would see a big quality jump in the study. Keep at it!

    best,


    JM

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    great analysis ! I like the slight angle, that seems to make all the elements slide to the right of the image but balance nicely by the figure sward.


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    @Jason: Thank you very much for the feedback! Iīll definitely try to improve that. :o)

    @terusan: Thank you, although I think the value on the sword is darker than it should be - saw it too late.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    I think the second one took slightly over an hour. I have a question though about brush sizes, as I am a bit lost in the process.

    I start with a big size to block in all the major values, but Iīm not sure if zooming in later on to add details is the way to go - I feel like Iīm losing the big picture. And if I donīt zoom in enough , I sort of brush over the details and end up with nothing. Any advice?


    Name:  2Ivan-Aivazovsky.png
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    I chose this painting by Ivan Aivazovsky, Russian marine painter from the Romanticism period - really magnificent works. Seemed a great piece to study values. All the design principles are present again - the repetition of the diagonals on the bottom right, simplified shapes suggesting ships in the distance, balance and contrast of lighted and shaded areas - just to name a few. The focal point is a little off to the right, although the perpendicular line that the light source and its reflection on the water surface create, push the eye to notice the castle on the cliff. The more we get lost in the background, the blurrier and less detailed things get.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Please spend another five to ten mins and knock in some sharp edges and the highlights on the water. studying your edges is a big part of this and leaving them all soft leaves a lot of the master's knowledge on the table that you could be getting into your own work. keep it up!

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    I took it from scratch with the second study - thank you Jason for pointing that out about the edges.
    Iīll keep in that as a note for my next studies. I tried to make them more prominent with this one,
    so I really hope it was a more careful observation this time.


    Name:  2.1Ivan-Aivazovsky.png
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    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    I really enjoyed the way you analyze each piece. I think you have strong observational skills and can communicate your thoughts very well. Looking forward to your next study!

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    Thank you very much! I hope I can soon get to the point of applying those observations, too. :o)

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    better but your edges on the crisp areas are still a bit soft...get those edges spot on! nice job.

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    Yes, I think my approach is a bit inaccurate - started a new study yesterday,
    but I have the same issue, plus a very wrong face perspective. So, Iīll give it
    another shot today and fix it and practice my edges some more. Thank you for your time Jason!

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Since yesterday evening turned out to be a fail to update, here's the 3rd installment.
    **I know the head perspective is off, the tilt is nowhere to be found and the torso/head
    placement wrong - after comparing the initial epic fail attempt and the second (this) one**

    A few things I noted down in between attempts on this piece - and compared to the very first ones:

    • limit values so things don't get too messy
    • don't focus on detailing - instead look at it as a whole
    • before blocking in with values, sketch lightly the elements, their angles their relationship to each other
    • get used to flipping the image and use shortcuts to save time and see things that don't look right
    • note down thoughts/observations for future reference



    (other thoughts for the future)
    • a smaller study size helps in shifting the focus from the specific to the general - try it
    • establish a goal that you want to achieve with each study - from practicing a specific brush
      stroke, to getting better at flipping or seeing the edges and applying them to your own study




    Name:  3Ivan-Kramskoy.png
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    I chose this painting by Ivan Kramskoy, Russian realist painter, because of the strong contrast that dominates the canvas. The subject is a portrait of an unknown woman placed centrally in the foreground. The background recedes subtly in a very suggestive atmospheric perspective, almost blurrying out behind the figure (economy as well as repetition - verticals, receding diagonals in 1-point persp. behind the figure). The blacks and the very dark values of her garments and the part of the carriage she sits in, push boldly forward and the focus is her, especially her face expression (emphasis). The entire piece is unified with careful placement and the use of the high contrasting dark/light values. There isn't any suggestion of movement, but there's a statement that the figure emits instead, which is equally, if not more, intriguing.

    Last edited by RaliVanMinks; February 7th, 2014 at 02:38 AM. Reason: typo
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Got caught up in details again. And anatomy/perspective caused a bit of a frustration, since itīs full of mistakes in that area. I tried working smaller this time, but canīt say the result is close to something I should be expecting after more than an hour - almost 2, not sure. Not sure how detailed the piece should be either. If itīs a thumbnail, I assume 3 values and fast work to get the basics of the composition should be the goal under one hour. If I work more than that, then I feel like I start expecting this to be the "perfect" study, so the psych. thing kicks in and so does the disappointment. And I still didnīt flip the canvas enough. Remembered that half way through.

    Name:  4William-Adolphe-Bouguereau-The-Veil.png
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    William-Adolphe Bouguereauīs work is exceptionally beautiful. Again, a realist painter. This paintings focus lies on the girls face, the way the veil works as an envelope around her head. In order to maintain a balanced and strong contrast, her black hair and the dark background combined and put together with the white drapery establish a very harmonious circular, almost like a spiral, movement for the eye to end up resting at her facial features. Another - visible - spiral at the bottom left enhances and unifies this idea. Wherever thereīs folds, thereīs rythm, repetition and economy, so basically all the necessary princinples for a successful painting are present.

    Last edited by RaliVanMinks; February 7th, 2014 at 08:05 PM.
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    You are doing very well with these, given the time frame, and if you can really focus on getting those values spot on, you will see an improvement in quality of the studies. also paying extra attention to edges will help too. Keep it up!

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    Thanks Jason, I'll keep trying!
    This one was way more than an hour, but at least
    I'm more satisfied with this study than the others.


    Name:  5Vermeer-Girl-with-the-PearlEar900.png
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    I chose Vermeer's painting mostly because it's a beautiful portrait with gorgeous facial features and beautiful simplicity at the same time. The focal point is the earring and there's plenty of contrast play: darks, lights and middle values are interchanging and complementing each other, in order to enhance specific points in the painting. Economy of strokes in the garment and the head wrap serve so as not to distract from the most important focus point, the earring and secondarily the face. The painting overall is very balanced and unified; it "breathes" effectively from the left and from the top, and while it resembles a very central placement, it still manages to avoid a mundane symmetry with the help of the directional and circular rhythmic lines of the turban.

    Last edited by RaliVanMinks; February 10th, 2014 at 06:41 AM.
    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Again - more than an hour. If I leave it under an hour it ends up messy. This one has quite
    a few mistakes, but I hope the general values are right.

    Name:  6Rembrandt--St.png
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    I chose a Rembrandt this time. Very dramatic lighting, very heavy and full of emotion. Verticals and diagonals
    give a specific rhythm to the painting (the wall/solid behind St. Peter and the straws of hay on the floor), and
    the presence of extreme contrasts aids the eye to fall on the focal point, St. Peter's expression/face. The latter
    is even more stressed by his white features and the light areas on his hands, also indicating variety in values especially.
    There's an overall economy in this piece, as things blend in with the darkest of darks or are left slightly suggested,
    but never distracting us from the main subject. The hay on the floor and the keys' placement also suggest repetition.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    values are coming along well. accuracy is also looking quite good. edges on the other hand...they need way more care, both in silhouette and in sharpness/softness. Until you master your edges, you will find yourself being just a little off with these. You can totally get it...you are very close.


    j

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    Thank you Jason, that's really great to hear! I'll keep practicing with that in mind.
    Hope I manage to get more used to sharper and better edges soon so it all pops up a bit better!

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Hey, these are looking great. It seems like you might have a bit of trouble with your darkest darks. They aren't quite matching the original. In some paintings they are too dark and in some too light. Mainly in 3,4, and 5. They are pretty close though.

    I take a lot longer than an hour as well. I will check back with you and see how the time frames are working for you.

    Keep it up!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Hey, these are looking great. It seems like you might have a bit of trouble with your darkest darks. They aren't quite matching the original. In some paintings they are too dark and in some too light. Mainly in 3,4, and 5. They are pretty close though.

    I take a lot longer than an hour as well. I will check back with you and see how the time frames are working for you.

    Keep it up!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpysaur View Post
    Hey, these are looking great. It seems like you might have a bit of trouble with your darkest darks. They aren't quite matching the original. In some paintings they are too dark and in some too light. Mainly in 3,4, and 5. They are pretty close though.

    I take a lot longer than an hour as well. I will check back with you and see how the time frames are working for you.

    Keep it up!
    Thank you! Yes, I totally need to work on, havenīt got the hang of it just yet.. I try to eye-ball it instead of eyedropping a value, so itīs not very precise, but I figured itīd be good practice. Apparently at the expense of the result, but Iīll have to observe and choose better and more exact values for the next ones.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Yes...no color picking! That is very good to learn to do it without that crutch. You are on the right track...just need more more more.


    jm

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    Just checking in with you. I am anticipating another.

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    Great work. Your study's keep getting better. The way you analyze the paintings are great. keep up the good work.

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    Hi everyone! After an almost 2-month hiatus here are two studies I finally finished. Both started in February and further worked on every chance I had. Unfortunately I didn't have a lot of time to complete them due to other obligations, but in between I tried to get some more info on basic brushwork. Hopefully some kind of progress will show in my upcoming studies. For now, I just wanted to tie loose ends and move on. And think I'll lay off portraits as much as I can, since I feel that wihtout solid foundation work on anatomy first, I only get discouraged - and stuck. Timewise, these were way beyond, since every time I worked on them for about half an hour, and the next time I'd just change things and almost start over. Anyway, here goes:

    Name:  7Aleksander-Gierymski900.png
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    Seventh installment is this painting by Aleksander Gierymski. A beautifully arranged composition, with a very dynamic foundation of triangles of different sizes, that solidify the way the eye travels back and forth between the two figures and the coffin. The four elements themselves (male, female, dog and coffin) seem to be enclosed by a triangle, which can also be argued to be the unifying element of this piece. The other spaces in between them are characterized by economy of value as well as detail. Additionally, the strong contrast between the two figures' clothing keeps the viewer's attention in place, while the coffin and the lying dog act like anchors, not distracting, but keeping the focal weight in place. There's variety in both horizontals and verticals, as well as oblique lines that break the picture plane and enhance depth.

    Name:  8Van-Dyk900.png
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    Number 8 is a van Dyck portrait. The entire painting is about personality and less about composition, in my opinion. The numerous folds of the drape are repetitive and alternate between dark and light according to the way the light hits it. Therefore there's a certain rythm that is more of a circular nature: from the face (central point of almost all portraits) enhanced by the ruff, to the drop of the fabric on the right, up to the knee (light), bouncing to the left hand and the lightest point (paper piece) and up to the head again. A circle, unifying by nature. The background is characterized by subtle darks that serve value economy, and push towards emphasis on the subject instead.



    @Grumpysaur: Thank you very much for checking up on me and sorry for the big delay.. I'll have to take a lokk around the next days and see how's everybody's been doing. I'm sure a lot of improvement's been done.

    @cricketts801: Thank you! I'm really not even close to where I want to get, but.. it's all a matter of adjusting and geting better, so.. I'll have to make time and push some more. Thanks for passing by!

    Last edited by RaliVanMinks; March 31st, 2014 at 05:03 AM.
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    You should be really proud of yourself! These are looking pretty great. A couple of things to think about- #7 isn't quite dark enough in the darkest darks. In #8, there could be a few carefully placed lighter areas on his face, to describe the light better. Also, as you work on more of them, think about popping in a few sharp edges here and there at the end, where you see them in the original. Yours look just a wee bit blurry.

    Keep observing your values, edges, and shapes! You are doing well!

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  32. #26
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    keep focused on sharping up your edges where the original has sharp edges...you are still a bit soft and blurry in places that can be crisp. keep up the good work.


    jm

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  34. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpysaur View Post
    You should be really proud of yourself! These are looking pretty great. A couple of things to think about- #7 isn't quite dark enough in the darkest darks. In #8, there could be a few carefully placed lighter areas on his face, to describe the light better. Also, as you work on more of them, think about popping in a few sharp edges here and there at the end, where you see them in the original. Yours look just a wee bit blurry.

    Keep observing your values, edges, and shapes! You are doing well!

    Thank you very much! The things you mention are my main problems, well, have been from the start. I'm a bit unsure as to how much to zoom in when doing the details, without losing trace of the ref. So mostly, I keep it zoomed out and work on it as it is. Will have to figure out another way to approach these studies. The one I just finished is a landscape, but I'm sure the edges may be off again. As for the values, I'll try pushing a bit my darks. And the lights. :o) Thank you very much for the feedback, much appreciated!

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Tried to work under 2 hours - ended up with about 1.5 hrs on this one. Figured Iīd do a landscape study this time and focus more on my values and edges, although the end result is again off. I have to remember not getting into the details before I've even built up a solid enough base.

    Name:  9Caspar-D.-Friedrich900.png
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    I chose this painting of Friedrich because of the atmospheric perspective and the foreground-background contrast. The economy principle dominates in the background in the form of value economy and lost edges, while it's exactly the opposite in the foreground. The eye sort of jumps from front to back with the help of the suggestive vertical unifying the mountaintops. And while it seems inactive, the rhythm of the mountain edges are varied, almost like waves. The overall compositional building block is the triangle, which here unifies and diversifies at the same time, giving the painting depth and inviting the eye to travel through the forms.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Half way there. This time I tried a bit of a different approach, since my edges are not getting any better. This study I actually enjoyed, even though it demaned a lot of detailing on a relatively small resolution - which might also be another reason why some of the previous studies are off. Will have to figure it out through trial and error.

    Name:  10Shishkin900.png
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    I chose one of Shishkin's amazing tree paintings, because each tree has a character of its own and they all look like majestic lonely giants. Strong verticals anchor the eye to the picture plane and give the illusion of distance, depth and perspective. They also pierce through the horizon line breaking the stabilitiy and balance that one expects from a fairly inactive subject as this one. The eye travels through the canvas following the "S" curve, and taking its time to absorb the scene. There's economy of value in the distant background, while the tree closest to us is detailed and pops out as the main focal point. There is repetition, rhythm and variety that is especially reflected in the trees' foliage and the plain, and balance between each element in the scene, either in terms of value or scale.

    The key is to start doing. The rest falls into place eventually.

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    Theres definately a nice improvement to shape accuracy in these last two studies - really noticable.

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