Psychopulse 75 - Composition 1.1

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Thread: Psychopulse 75 - Composition 1.1

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    Psychopulse 75 - Composition 1.1

    Name:  Lilo and Stitch house small 1.jpg
Views: 444
Size:  46.9 KBName:  Lilo and Stitch house paint study.jpg
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    1. For my first composition study, I've decided to take a look at a background from Disney's Lilo and Stitch. The emphasis is clearly seen on Lilo and Nani's house, which is the first thing you'll easily notice, of course. There's also a lot of economy used with trees and the mountains, and some continuity for the dirt path leading up to the house.
    Some of the trees are palm while others are birch, giving some variety to the pic.

    Name:  1.jpg
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Size:  7.0 KBName:  Waterfall study.jpg
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    2. The second one for today is a waterfall background from Disney's Pocahontas. Now, the first thing I notice is the economy used, from much of the mountain and the rock formations, and even those tree leaves in the foreground. But what especially impressed me is the rhythm and balance this piece has. The two giant stones are on the opposite sides of each other, giving symmetrical balance, as well as the rhythm of the rock formations, with smaller stone platforms on the middle and sides, with the two giant stones in between them. I also see a smooth, lumpy rhythm within the mountain cliff itself, and the tree leaves on the top left to help balance out the rocky cliff on the top right.

    Name:  images.jpg
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Size:  5.4 KBName:  forest study.jpg
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    3. I have no clue where this is from, I'm sure someone will tell me. Anyway, the first thing I notice is the boy being lost in the forest, but this pic has a variety in the light to dark transition, with the boy being in the middle. There's lots of economy, repetition and continuity within the trees in this picture, and I can even see a rhythm going from fewer trees on the left side to more trees on the right side.

    Last edited by Psychopulse75; February 3rd, 2014 at 03:41 PM.
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    Great analysis and great choices for images too. You should paint these while you analyze them. You will see far more if you do...and that is the purpose of the assignment, to create actual painted studies and the analysis. Perhaps it was not clear given the example thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Manley View Post
    Great analysis and great choices for images too. You should paint these while you analyze them. You will see far more if you do...and that is the purpose of the assignment, to create actual painted studies and the analysis. Perhaps it was not clear given the example thread.
    Yeah, I've seen other people do that. I'll update with the black and white painted versions in a moment alongside later studies.

    Last edited by Psychopulse75; February 1st, 2014 at 08:31 AM.
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    Edit: I replaced the black and white pictures with my painted studies. With that said, this was a little trickier than I thought. In particular, I had to intentionally leave out some details due to my less-than impressive painting skills...

    Last edited by Psychopulse75; February 3rd, 2014 at 03:33 PM.
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    you should absolutely be leaving out the little details. the process we are working with is from general to specific so the goal is to really hit the big points, the overall picture, first and foremost. please follow instructions regarding how to present the images next to the originals so they can be compared. I think you should check out others threads to see what I mean.


    jason

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Manley View Post
    you should absolutely be leaving out the little details. the process we are working with is from general to specific so the goal is to really hit the big points, the overall picture, first and foremost. please follow instructions regarding how to present the images next to the originals so they can be compared. I think you should check out others threads to see what I mean.


    jason
    I see what you mean now. The painted studies have been moved to the OP. And I did in fact make the mistake of trying to do too much.

    Back to the studies...

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    Here's the latest...

    Name:  LW408.jpg
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Size:  55.9 KBName:  Swans study.jpg
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    Swans by M.C. Escher. I've always been fascinated by his work and this masterpiece of his is no different. In particular, the first things that are immediately apparent are the repetition of the swans and the balance of black and white against a simple gray background, making good use of the economy in this piece. The infinity symbol is also used excellently giving this piece a really good rhythm and continuity.

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    The lines are integral in the last piece. I would suggest adding those. I hope you don't give up on this stuff. You are on the right track.

    j

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    That's why I'm here. I'm hoping to pay for the course for a few months at some point.

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    keep at this...there is plenty to do

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    After taking another look at the video again, I have a renewed drive to continue. I did this next one in pencil.

    Name:  Escher Study.jpg
Views: 190
Size:  55.5 KBName:  Escher Study 1.jpg
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    This is another M.C. Escher Piece, Hand with Reflecting sphere. The emphasis is wonderfully played with here. At first glance, it's the hand holding the sphere, but then you see the reflection in it as well as the person holding the sphere. The detail the in the room reflected in the sphere and the hand holding it wonderfully balances out the economy of the background you see. But all sorts of things are going on in that reflection too. You see a variety of books big and small on the bookshelf, giving it a clunky rhythm, and you can see lots of things like the pictures, the chairs and tables, even the window and lightbulb.

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    that is a beautiful piece to study. one of my favorites from my childhood. i am glad you are back at this. awesome.

    this may seem like a silly question. i assure you it is not. why did you make the ball not round?

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    Yeah, I guess I did make it a little smaller, but I got the width right, at least. I'm usually more accurate with pencil, but I even I have the occasional slip.

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    its totally ok...everyone in here does that...but typically with abstract shapes. circles tend to get drawn out with a compass or the like, or sketched out very carefully. check your shapes before you start pounding in your darks that cant be removed. keep it up too.

    i will give you my straight dope...i want you to keep getting better. j

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Manley View Post
    its totally ok...everyone in here does that...but typically with abstract shapes. circles tend to get drawn out with a compass or the like, or sketched out very carefully. check your shapes before you start pounding in your darks that cant be removed. keep it up too.

    i will give you my straight dope...i want you to keep getting better. j
    I will. I'll post more stuff tomorrow.

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    Name:  NNR B&W.png
Views: 154
Size:  160.0 KBName:  Neon Night Riders Study.jpg
Views: 144
Size:  212.3 KB

    The next composition study is from the arcade version of Turtles in Time. This is the background for the 7th stage, Neon Night Riders. Backgrounds are ay weakness here, and it sadly shows. The top half of the pic wasn't too bad, but the bottom half was tougher than I thought it would be. And there there's the fact that the there's so many lights I had to drop them from the sketch altogether.

    So why would I take the trouble to go sketch something as complex as this? Well, this piece has a lot going on in it! The colored version has so many colors used, there's lots of rhythm and variety in the buildings, the searchlights and even the reflection as a nice choppy rhythm to it! You can see a nice balance dividing the picture as follows, city, ocean, city, sky...

    But this wasn't really my best work, I'll admit. It serves me right for attempting something more complex...

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    Ok great to see where you are at. When you are first getting started it is very important to really focus in on the mapping out of your shapes as accurately as you can possibly get them. If you put a shape in the wrong place and commit you end up having the other shapes off and require fixing, which increases painting time. By taking just a few extra minutes early on to measure out your shapes, to compare your shapes, and be sure they are placed and drawn accurately will make the rest of the painting process, working out your values and edges, much much easier.

    You should flip the images horizontally and vertically so that you see the shapes with fresh eyes. This should be part of the process and if you are already doing that, keep doing it more. The professional artists will often flip images or use a mirror to see with fresh eyes as many as three or four times a minute as they are working when things really get flowing. You can also back away...actually get up and back away...and doing this works for shapes as well as checking values and edges.

    You have to spend more time observing then putting a mark. You seem to be spending more time working on your piece than looking at the original and it should be literally 50/50 time wise. If you start wandering into sketching and drawing without observing you will find yourself off the path. Keep a close eye on the original...even keep it in the corner of your eye while you put the mark down so you stay honest to it.

    Keep up the good work.


    jm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Manley View Post
    Ok great to see where you are at. When you are first getting started it is very important to really focus in on the mapping out of your shapes as accurately as you can possibly get them. If you put a shape in the wrong place and commit you end up having the other shapes off and require fixing, which increases painting time. By taking just a few extra minutes early on to measure out your shapes, to compare your shapes, and be sure they are placed and drawn accurately will make the rest of the painting process, working out your values and edges, much much easier.

    You should flip the images horizontally and vertically so that you see the shapes with fresh eyes. This should be part of the process and if you are already doing that, keep doing it more. The professional artists will often flip images or use a mirror to see with fresh eyes as many as three or four times a minute as they are working when things really get flowing. You can also back away...actually get up and back away...and doing this works for shapes as well as checking values and edges.

    You have to spend more time observing then putting a mark. You seem to be spending more time working on your piece than looking at the original and it should be literally 50/50 time wise. If you start wandering into sketching and drawing without observing you will find yourself off the path. Keep a close eye on the original...even keep it in the corner of your eye while you put the mark down so you stay honest to it.

    Keep up the good work.


    jm
    This makes a lot of sense. It really does. And this advice will certainly help for future pics. I've never really flipped pictures around, but I can certainly try it out for the next set of pictures I'm working on.

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    Time for the latest...

    Name:  Troy Story small b&w.jpg
Views: 75
Size:  61.8 KB
    Name:  Troy Story Study.jpg
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    This is a scene from the Phineas and Ferb episode Troy Story. I wanted to attempt characters and backgrounds. This time, however, I took my sweet time with these next two studies, spend about an hour on both of them. This is an improvment over my last pitful attempt, but I had to lighten up the sky with an eraser as I made it too dark (I have a bad habit of drawing real hard in pencil and I''m trying to break it).

    The emphasis is Phineas and Isabella from their built castle re-enacting the city of Troy. The stone bricks of varying sizes were a little tricky due to the spaces between them, but I've managed to do them the best as I can by following the continuity of the lines. The sky is also a good use of economy aside from some clouds.

    Name:  Cuddling with Strawberry Small b&w.jpg
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    Name:  Snuggle Study.jpg
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    This next pic is a scene from the 2003 Strawberry Shortcake Christmas Special. Now why would I want to draw a scene from a cartoon like this, off all things? I like the art style and character designs, for one, and while this scene was fairly challenging, I took my sweet time with this one at around 60-90 minutes. BTW, the drawing came out the way it did because I ran out of space on the paper... heh...

    I generally have a habit of focusing on things with an emphasis and then I springboard from there as I try to notice the other elements of a picture. The pic even has the two in a bright spot as if to say, "Hey, look at us snuggling together in Santa's workshop!" Fortunately, I found plenty of other elements such as the variety of the size and wrapping paper of the presents, the repetition of the pattern in the candy cane poles as well as the wavy rhythm of Honey Pie Pony's mane and tail.

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    Name:  decalcomania black and white.jpg
Views: 60
Size:  32.1 KBName:  decalcomania study.jpg
Views: 60
Size:  100.5 KB

    Here's another one I did in 30 minutes; Decalcomania by René_Magritte. The balance between the human and the silhouette cut-out in the curtains immediately caught my eye along with the diversity in the clouds as well as their placement throughout this picture. I'm studying two (maybe three more from this artist and that seems to be a general use of rhythm, repetition and balance throughout his work.

    I think I'm starting to get the hang of this.

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    great to see you experimenting with different types of images. however you must bite down and get your shapes and values handled in an accurate way if you are to truly study these pieces. you can do this. slow down. match your shapes. match your values. you will learn a lot if you do.

    j

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