Introduction To Anatomy For A CTRL Paint Disciple - Which one?
 
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    Introduction To Anatomy For A CTRL Paint Disciple - Which one?

    Hi everyone!

    My question mainly revolves around tutorials which deal with basic/simplified anatomy for artists. I have looked all over the net and although i have found some amazing workshops such as those found on Gnomon, CGMW and Digital Tutors i don't think any other them deliver a decent anatomical education geared specifically for a beginner.

    The tutorials seems to drop you head first into a rather deep pool of anatomical knowledge. CTRLPaint.com has a drawing philosophy of drawing from the very general to the specific. It also advocates the breakdown of objects into simplified 3d forms. I cant find a tutorial about anatomy that also deals with subject matter in this way. For example showing the bare minimum anatomy create a simplified body ( cartoonish ) which is then built upon with more anatomical knowledge to create increasingly detailed anatomical forms.

    Maybe what i am after does not exist but it would be a great help to me if someone could point me in the right direction to learn basic anatomy.

    Thank you very much for your time.

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    Well what I think you're looking for are shortcuts in drawing anatomy. The truth is. Theres no such thing as a 'basic' anatomy class , where you get on with simplifying the anatomy into basic shapes and form.
    Thats actually the advance part. In learning something as complez as anatomy you will need to study it piece by piece and theres no easy way really.
    Anyway have you ever checjed out proko on youtube? Just follow out his figure drawing playlist and piece it together to get an idea of how figure drawing is done. Though I didn't think he gets to deep in anatomy though, but he does get to making some anatomy into basic shapes

    Work hard . Play HARD.
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    Well what I think you're looking for are shortcuts in drawing anatomy. The truth is. Theres no such thing as a 'basic' anatomy class , where you get on with simplifying the anatomy into basic shapes and form.
    Thats actually the advance part. In learning something as complez as anatomy you will need to study it piece by piece and theres no easy way really.
    Anyway have you ever checjed out proko on youtube? Just follow out his figure drawing playlist and piece it together to get an idea of how figure drawing is done. Though I didn't think he gets to deep in anatomy though, but he does get to making some anatomy into basic shapes

    Work hard . Play HARD.
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    While i am looking for simplified versions of anatomy to work from i am not after shortcuts. I have seen this course with Michael Hampton as well as read his book back to back. The major downside with this tutorial is that he does not focus on the analysis. There is a lot left to the read/viewer to figure out. http://2d.cgmasteracademy.com/analyt...e-drawing.html. For example when he draws over a three dimensional layin, he draws in flat 2 dimensional muscle groups and only occasionally works on the form of the muscle itself. More time is spent relating the muscle groups to simple base geometry which is frustrating. In other words, he only shows you the specific anatomy from one angle which is useless when you try to find outside reference. This is because any outside reference does not lead off of his work so there is another large information gap.

    The closest thing I have found the sort of meets my needs its a book by Chris Hart ( i don't usually subscribe to his books because of the 1-2-3 draw he tends to adopt.) called Simplified Anatomy for the Comic Books Artist. Although this book also have elements of the 1-2-3 draw approach in it, if you disregard this he does show character anatomy breakdowns from every angle. Its not exactly what i am after as it does not show these breakdowns in a 3d perspective. Its mostly flat design.

    I am looking for muscle groups shown in three dimensional perspective as a way to better comprehend their form and how they relate to one another.


    (EDIT) - Ok i think i have a better way to explain what i am after. I Am looking for a tutorial which deals with drawing human anatomy the same way a 3D sculpture deals with anatomy. Starting from a very generalized form which is then progressively made more and more specific.

    Last edited by Chaic; January 23rd, 2014 at 04:30 PM.
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    Someone shared this with me the other day. I haven't gotten into it yet, but, maybe it helps? If not, sorry! lol

    http://www.memrise.com/course/87415/artistic-anatomy/

    - - - Updated - - -

    Someone shared this with me the other day. I haven't gotten into it yet, but, maybe it helps? If not, sorry! lol

    http://www.memrise.com/course/87415/artistic-anatomy/

    -AdrienneRose-


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    Thank you AdrienneRose this is quite interesting. I would consider that resource however to be to advanced for my needs. It deals with the naming and memorization of anatomical terms. This is fine for a test but it doesn't really show what the muscles,bones ect look like in any real depth.

    My solution to my problem has been to create my own resource. I have downloaded a 3d model of a skinless human with all muscles exposed. The in combination with a book called "Simplified Anatomy for the Comic Artist" I am breaking down each individual muscle group and studying their individual forms. Its actually working out really well seeing that i can zoom in and change my view of the particular muscle i am studying.

    When I have made a little more progress i plan to post all my research notes and resources on here for everyone. Its a little sad though that no real anatomical resources exist for beginner artists. They all take the form of static raster images with no reference to constructive drawing techniques.

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    Sorry! The only options that I know of are the books, there are lots of "Anatomy for the Artist" books, and also a lot of people will recommend Michael Hampton's, and Andrew Loomis' books. I too am beginning studying sorts of anatomy. I look forward to seeing what you find!

    There are lots of free book resources on archive.org. Best of luck!

    -AdrienneRose-


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