Recovery from depression

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  1. #1
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    Recovery from depression

    Anyone here who fully recovered from depression? If you were depressed and fully recovered could please PM me with what helped? I'd appreciate it.

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    1. See a doctor about it.

    2. Clench your teeth and make yourself carry on. Lead the normal life even if it feels hard or pointless. It shall pass.

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  4. #3
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    Is that what worked for you personally?

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    Option 2 had worked for me in the past, but I give no guarantee it will work for everyone.

    Depression is not just brain chemistry; it is also a self-perpetuating behavior pattern. Break the pattern, and it will be easier to change the chemistry.

    What makes it tricky is that the first thing that goes if you are depressed is your motivation. You have to carry on despite lack of motivation, fake it until you make it. Learning something new in a structured environment can also help - any sort of obligation that both keeps you occupied and makes you get off the floor and go somewhere to do something, and is interesting enough.

    But still, see a doctor.

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    Option 2 had worked for me in the past, but I give no guarantee it will work for everyone.

    Depression is not just brain chemistry; it is also a self-perpetuating behavior pattern. Break the pattern, and it will be easier to change the chemistry.

    What makes it tricky is that the first thing that goes if you are depressed is your motivation. You have to carry on despite lack of motivation, fake it until you make it. Learning something new in a structured environment can also help - any sort of obligation that both keeps you occupied and makes you get off the floor and go somewhere to do something, and is interesting enough.

    But still, see a doctor.

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    I don't know what kind or stage of depression youre currently in, but when I starts to feel stressed and depress I workout and meditate , it helps for you to sweat so you reduce the stress hormones in your brain plus it provides you a toned body

    Work hard . Play HARD.
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  8. #7
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    Like arenhaus said. Depression is a huge catch-22. You need 'motivation' to break out of that vicious cycle, which only saps it more, leaving you the dried, zombified husk that was once a person that was you.

    Not necessarily "See a Doctor". The 'Doctors' I've been to have either been at best utterly useless, or at worst negligently mal-practiced and I'm still considering suing the ones that fucked me completely, into the god damn ground for the damage they caused with their trial and error medications and colossal lapses in stupid judgements. But more specifically "Get help" - and help can come in many forms, doctors being one of them if it is appropriate. But that depends on the source or cause of the depression. If originating in actual brain chemistry fucking up, meds will be the answer. If not, they will quite simply have an 'effect', but not be beneficial to actually warrant the term 'work', and that effect can be quite maleficial.

    As for me..I'm still recovering from it. Not only from depression onset by extremely distressing childhood years and extreme emotional and social isolation, but also from getting fucked over 9 years ago in a real hardcore Chinese mental asylum for 2 months due to the Dr's 'esteemed' negligence and stupid system wide failure at 17 years old, but also being medicated hardcore for 8 years which at best only turned me into a waking zombie, but at best actually turned me crazy - the thing they were trying to 'cure'. The cure itself being worse than the disease that was never there.

    I'm recovering slowly due to having finally struck it lucky with reconnecting with a highschool acquaintance, who was an upstanding, decent, and understanding guy, and simply friends after having been fucking gutted by worthless Fair Weatherers and shitty fuckstains. Hanging out, socializing, cutting the stupid fucking meds, cutting out the bullshit, and taking time off to recover slowly. It's hard, hell, I know that more than most ever will. But just keep trying, even if you can't see the exit and light at the end of the tunnel yet. Staying stationary in the abyss won't really get you anywhere. Just keep moving, because when you're in the bowels of the abyss, all you can really do is soldier on.

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    We all have our own cross to bear. We're equipped to handle everything we can honestly accept.

    You can just call me Cam.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir-Cam View Post
    We all have our own cross to bear. We're equipped to handle everything we can honestly accept.
    That's like telling someone with a broken leg that everyone's legs feel a little tired every now and then.


    For me, I've been depressed as long as I can remember. Started therapy six years ago when I almost offed myself. Had a few serious relapses since then, but not so bad I was hospitalised (though I almost was once).

    Ended up having some serious family drama over my schooling, where my parents cut me off from my psych and sent me to another. I was furious about it at the time, but they ended up actually making the right decision. Psych took one look at me, went, "You're depressed because you're anxious, and you're anxious because your parents treat you like shit." Gave me a bunch of exercises and social techniques to use on them.

    Bam. Depression gone. The only times I've felt depressed since was when something my parents did caught me unprepared. I'd feel horrible for a few hours, then I'd bounce back.

    Well, it's not that cut and dry. I think a large amount of it was years of therapy finally "clicking". Simply put, I was scared of people because I didn't know how to handle them, and this made me feel helpless, and feeling helpless made me depressed. Rather than do what all the other psychs did (which was teach me how to feel better about being helpless), this one actually gave me the tools to stop feeling helpless. (No, seriously, we spent several sessions going "Okay, if someone does this, you do that." Blew my mind how well it worked.) In only a few sessions, I felt way different to the six years of therapy I'd had before that. He didn't even broach the topic of meds. I'm a completely different person to who I was a year ago, and things that terrified me three months ago don't faze me at all now. It was like being hit by the miracle truck. I honestly believed nobody could ever recover completely from depression before this.

    I'm not so silly to believe it's gone forever, but I think a large amount of it has lifted, and I can deal with whatever comes my way now.

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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir-Cam View Post
    We all have our own cross to bear. We're equipped to handle everything we can honestly accept.
    That was very callous and shallow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir-Cam View Post
    We all have our own cross to bear. We're equipped to handle everything we can honestly accept.
    In a way that is true tough. But it's also overly simplified.
    Let's add to that and say that some people just have heavier crosses that get nearly impossible to carry over longer distances.

    Personally, I have yet to meet someone who fully recovered from depression. Just when you think they're really getting better.. *Poof* and everything is back to shit.
    Lately I've figured that going against the grains helps a great deal when I'm really down. As in, I don't feel like doing anything, so my natural instincts tell me to stay in bed and browse the internet until the dog has to pee. But instead of doing that, I do anything else. The laundry, organizing the room, bathing my cat, drawing, or painting! Anything that isn't just finding somewhere else to sit to stare into another screen.
    It might not help for you, or your friends, but you could try it as a temporary quick fix. Of course it isn't always as easy to just force yourself to do things you're not motivated to do.

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  13. #12
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    Just to add something small that could make a great deal of difference, please have a go at starting an exercise routine of some sort. What ever you like. Walk, go for runs, get an exercise bike, play tennis. Give it a try.

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    Oh, dear. Nice to see a little ray of sunshine... or somebody who thinks best advice for depression is "make like curtains and pull yourself together". Seriously, I find the best thing is to just keep going as best as you're able and be kind to yourself when you trip up.

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    Unfortunately, nobody can be 'fully recovered' from depression. More and more medical / psychological evidence suggests depression is a pattern - more a default setting than a passing disease. There is a difference between clinical depression and a moment of depressive behaviors or thoughts - such as that what happens after great loss or physical trauma; but on the whole depression is a state you (and loads of other people) have to cope with on a daily basis.

    Patterns of thought to avoid / talk yourself against:

    Exaggerations such as 'always' or 'never' - words and thoughts that blow up a minor issue into a huge travesty, or put the blame on a circumstance as if it were the norm (the sky is falling - no it's just an apple).

    Criticisms against not only yourself, but others - all the bad things you're telling yourself, in the moment, try to apply them to someone you love or hold in high regard. You wouldn't talk to them like that, so why talk to yourself the same way?

    Blaming. Anyone. Guilt and shame and anger and blame get ABSOLUTELY nothing constructive done - they are a trap, avoid them at all costs. I know well enough that it feels 'cheap' to focus on just the good, so don't do that. But don't devote yourself to all the bad, either. It is equally cheap.

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  17. #15
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    http://www.creativesomething.net/pos...ity-and-how-it

    I wouldn't recommend just medicating everything away, ESPECIALLY if you are an artist. The article linked provides a few examples on depression and anxiety and how they are bi-products of a brain set to the valuable thinking patterns a creative mind needs to flourish.

    when all,s said and done the message is clear
    it,s lonely as king in the kingdom of fear
    [:amon26]
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    Some members in this thread were going on a tangent that was getting out of hand and I've purged the thread. Please respect the original poster and keep your comments relevant to the topic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel Ludvigsen View Post
    Some members in this thread were going on a tangent that was getting out of hand and I've purged the thread. Please respect the original poster and keep your comments relevant to the topic.
    I do not like this habit of censorship that CA is acquiring. Locking threads that have ceased to be useful or temp-banning people who are behaving poorly is necessary to good forum management. The voice of authority coming in and saying "that's enough kids" is one thing. People respect that. The voice of authority coming in and deleting things and saying "nothing happened here, guys" is an obvious lie and people lose respect for it and the forum. Lack of integrity is going to kill us faster than any petty argument ever will.

    Also, off-topic tangents are pretty normal in a casual discussion forum, and restricting them does more harm than good.

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  21. #18
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    I agree with vineris. This purge wasn't a good idea.

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    I agree too.

    Rather than stifling a possibly uncomfortable discussion, let people share and get feedback on their opinions. Not sure, but I am guessing the suicide reference was an issue in the decision. But when someone is asking about depression, that should be allowed to be brought up and discussed.

    So as a PSA, here is my contribution to the topic for anyone thinking about it. I know this is not some kinds of counseling forum, so I will keep this brief. Maybe it will help someone who needs it more than deleting posts will:

    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
    Name:  Logo[1].png
Views: 354
Size:  33.2 KB

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  23. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    I do not like this habit of censorship that CA is acquiring. Locking threads that have ceased to be useful or temp-banning people who are behaving poorly is necessary to good forum management. The voice of authority coming in and saying "that's enough kids" is one thing. People respect that. The voice of authority coming in and deleting things and saying "nothing happened here, guys" is an obvious lie and people lose respect for it and the forum. Lack of integrity is going to kill us faster than any petty argument ever will.

    Also, off-topic tangents are pretty normal in a casual discussion forum, and restricting them does more harm than good.
    I agree with you general view about censorship, it's not a good thing (though again, this is the wrong thread to discuss it). But in a thread where someone advocated suicide to a member asking help about recovering from depression a certain line has been crossed. The user then followed up with sarcastic remarks and sparred with the moderators and wouldn't relent so things got out of hand. In any other thread I might have let it stand, but some threads are more serious than others and I decided to purge this one so Leonor can get the answers he's looking for.

    If you'd like to discuss further please create a separate post or feel free to send me a private message.

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  25. #21
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    There was no "advocacy" of suicide in my post. Read the thing in context, please. Saying I advocated suicide is dishonest, especially after my text has been removed so people can't read it and judge for themselves.

    My subsequent bitter remark was a reaction to censorship.
    Censorship can't protect anyone from suicide.
    I can interpret removal of my post only as an act of kneejerk small-minded paranoia.

    This is my last post on this forum so I'll use it to make a suggestion. It's addressed to people in charge;

    Get artists to manage your forums instead of office clerks and wannabes. Artists tend to understand the following concepts:

    - freedom of expression
    - figurative speech
    - lateral thinking
    - alternative view
    - poetical discourse

    on a level that's not just declarative.

    Yes-men, on the other hand, will be scared of these things. Mainly because they don't understand them. Given power, they'll thus act on the basis of their own insecurities, paranoias and prejudices to obstruct free exchange of thoughts they deem frightening. This shouldn't be happening in an open minded community.

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    That's enough, LaCan. Your post was found inappropriate and tasteless by other members and the moderation team, and ultimately I agree with them. If this had been a thread about cars or pottery it would be fine. But it isn't.

    It's a thread where someone is asking for help with recovering from depression, something I believe you are familiar with as well. A snarky comment like yours was not called for, and the fact that you kept pushing it and derailing the topic furthered the issue. Now you are blowing it out of proportion.

    Now, if you have any more issues about the case you can create another thread or message me directly. Any further debating in this post will be removed.

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  28. #23
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    I've been feeling great the past few weeks and I started being productive again. I've been full of ideas and I'm on the stage of writing them down as they come. I've even restarted drawing today. And it felt good!

    I've come to the realization I was admiring the masters of types of art that I admired but I really didn't like doing the actual work to get to the level of the masters. I was labeling myself a type of artist that I'm not.

    I also corrected a series of conflicts in my mind, with the help of a philosopher friend.

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  29. #24
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    Glad to hear you are doing better.

    Keep the mood up, it is too easy to slide back! Don't lose the sight of what makes you feel good, and don't lower your guard yet.

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    It's wonderful that you're feeling better Leonor! I'm an anxiety case, myself. I have dealt with situational depression during some of the more rocky times which usually leads me to become a work-a-holic or a clean-a-holic depending on if I'm working at the time.
    As an above poster mentioned an exercise routine can help. It doesn't need to be ultra intensive P90X style stuff. I have started walking daily and it has really helped me deal with a particularly dark chapter. I think part of it is just giving myself that time to be with myself and think while I wander around. It's strangely more effective than building a blanket nest and thinking in there.
    Maybe it's because I'm "going somewhere" even if it's in a circle, I don't really know- but it helps .
    luck!

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  32. #26
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    I can definitely relate, I always had a problem with depression even from early childhood. My advice would be to talk to a professional, as well as get more into spirituality. Hope this helps!

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    1. That sucks.
    2. I'm so glad you're feeling better!

    I don't know if I ever had an official diagnosis, but I do know that something was wrong for about a year, maybe 1.5 years - my guess is depression that started moderate, then went to mild-moderate for a long time, and now all that's left a slight melancholia that takes over for a few days at a time. My main takeaway: awareness/mindfulness are important.

    By this I mean being aware of...everything, of what I was thinking, of what was going on in my body, noticing general trends (e.g. "I feel really shitty if I don't do homework for more than three days in a row", "my ex being cold to me makes me feel really, REALLY bad") was really helpful - but only after I learned to stop following those threads into oblivion (in psychology this is called depressive rumination).

    With this awareness you can start doing fun things like recognizing what changes your mood. Find out what makes you feel better. Find out what makes you feel worse. Write it down - keep the 'better' list visible and the 'worse' stuff can go into a journal/diary. Make sure to have some simple items on the list of what makes you feel good, so you can draw on them when you need to. This is much easier said than done (who feels like putting on happy music and jumping around when they've been crying for four hours?), but it's nice to know that there are things you could do.

    Inform yourself - if you cannot get to a therapist/counsellor, read some self-help books. I have heard good things about David Burns' Feeling Good. The internet can sometimes be helpful. I've been going through David Richo's How to be an Adult and although little of it is groundbreaking stuff for me now, I can recognize a lot of things in there that were lessons I had to learn slowly and painfully over the past two years - seemingly obvious things, too. I used to think that 'adults' would have all of that figured out and that those things were just new to me because I was young (a little more than 18 at the time) but apparently the book has been helpful to all sorts of people. It is quite heavy on spirituality mumbo-jumbo and parent issues, so I mentally rephrase them to be more general, because the underlying messages are sound.

    Read up about depression too. It is very important to not let this make you feel broken/like a failure/dysfunctional - take it a little at a time. Overdosing on information about clinical psychology DEFINITELY worsened my initial condition* and still puts me in a bad mood these days (ironic, since I plan to do research in the field at some point). Educating yourself has to go hand-in-hand with self-compassion and self-care. A Google search for these terms will show some blogs that help with this - cute kittens, encouraging posts. It feels cheesy but it's important to be nice to yourself. Celebrate the small things, as I see you are already doing If you're female, being aware that PMS is a real thing (this sounds silly, but for a long time I was convinced it didn't apply to me) can help take some of the pressure off yourself when the depression intensifies for a few days once or twice a month.

    Spirituality is great, as someone mentioned earlier. That doesn't just mean religion - I'm an atheist, haha - and it's hard to put into words; I guess being grateful, appreciating everyday beauty in the world. We artists are naturally good at this so that's one thing that I can consistently rely on, focusing on pretty patterns of light when my mind is full of static. Explore your connectedness to the world around you; look for ways in which you are connected to people and the environment around you, and write them down. This can be hard sometimes. Again, awareness.

    Meditation can be very helpful - focusing on deep breathing, the sensation of your belly going up and down; no need to ignore thoughts or try to shut them down, just focus on the breath and that will take some power away from bad thoughts. It doesn't have to be the breath; I used to take a shower. Sometimes medidation is too hard to do, especially when your mind is just way too loud. In this case throwing yourself into activity helps. Anything to get your mind off the "everything is bad" railroad for a while. I like taking walks outside and noticing the color of the sky.

    Know when to retreat. I started taking a short nap/lying in bed when I felt the characteristic tiredness and tension that signalled something bad was going to happen. It was better than continuing to sit in front of my computer (most likely reading something that would make me feel worse while mentally beating myself up for not doing work). Always remember that these are tactical retreats, not failures, not giving up!

    Forcing myself to focus on something external was very important for me - getting outdoors, talking to people. Running errands.

    If you live in a place with seasons, as I do now (my home country just has summer all year round), remember to get sunlight in the colder months too.

    Becoming aware of my emotions was also another big thing for me, and was something I couldn't have figured out on my own because the idea of 'emotions' just didn't really exist in my mind. Friends or counsellors can often help with things like this. A website called Moodscope.com lets you do a little quiz every day to track your emotions - I've found the scores that you get to be less than helpful but the real merit of it is in how it forces you to think about how you've been feeling.

    Lastly, patience.

    Feel better soon! I hope this helps. It's all anecdotal, and as mentioned I did not suffer from major depression (I think), but maybe something here is applicable to your situation.


    * I have strong opinions on the over-pathologizing of mild to moderate mental health issues because of this.

    Edit Hooooooly cow that was a long post. Sorry guys, I didn't realize.

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  35. #28
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    Hey, not sure if this is a bit late. I'm sorry you're feeling from depression. I do suffer from it from time to time, though it's never officially diagnosed.

    I recently came across an excellent TED video about how to naturally manage depression, I think you might find it helpful.


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