Castle with a bridge.
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Thread: Castle with a bridge.

  1. #1
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    Castle with a bridge.

    Name:  2g Point.jpg
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    Hey guys, I need help with this piece, an overpaint would be good as well if possible or overdraw.

    My main problem is, if that is where the horizon line is, does that mean my background is incompatible with the current placement? Do I need to draw the mountains so I can see the back of them in a way?

    I am aware of the angled wall that is not in perspective, I am actually fixing that when my teacher pointed that out, but what about the background, can someone sketch out quickly what possible backgrounds would be possible by angle I mean, not the actual content?

    Cheers x

    Also critiques available for anything else I can improve on.

    I am also aware the picture is too clean, I am going to roughen up some of the brick work and edges as well as add some detail to the clean walls or empty walls that don't have much like moss near the water etc.

    Also has anyone got any simple yet easy to learn perspective of how to distance thing once they go out into the distance? Like the pillars on the bridge?

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  2. #2
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    Hello, I'm sorry to tell you that but your main problem is not your horizon. The problem is you don't know (yet) anything about perspective basics.

    Name:  2g Point.jpg
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    #1 seems to show a roughly vanishing point (very rough actually :-) ) but all the #3 is totally not in line toward it.
    #2 the oblical part of the wall shows bricks that don't converge to any vanishing points.

    So to sum up: you must decide BEFORE drawing anything (especially for architecture pictures like that) where is your horizon line and then draw accordingly. All the parallel lines must lead to the same vanishing point on the horizon line.
    Read "Perspective drawing hand book" by D'Amelio or "Perspective made easy" by Norling. They are both fun and effective to understand perspective.

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    You did a lot of things correctly, but also a lot of things wrong. If something is above the horizon it means you're looking up at it. Your ellipses curve the wrong way. Also, more accuracy is needed when drawing perspective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelda_geek View Post
    You did a lot of things correctly, but also a lot of things wrong. If something is above the horizon it means you're looking up at it. Your ellipses curve the wrong way. Also, more accuracy is needed when drawing perspective.
    How did you calculate the line positioning of the wall with the tunnel that leads water through? If it's 1 point perspective....aren't they meant to converge into that vanishing point? I am so confused I feel like you emulated another vanishing point somewhere :/ even though it looks...correct

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    Quote Originally Posted by StefRob View Post
    Hello, I'm sorry to tell you that but your main problem is not your horizon. The problem is you don't know (yet) anything about perspective basics.

    Name:  2g Point.jpg
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    #1 seems to show a roughly vanishing point (very rough actually :-) ) but all the #3 is totally not in line toward it.
    #2 the oblical part of the wall shows bricks that don't converge to any vanishing points.

    So to sum up: you must decide BEFORE drawing anything (especially for architecture pictures like that) where is your horizon line and then draw accordingly. All the parallel lines must lead to the same vanishing point on the horizon line.
    Read "Perspective drawing hand book" by D'Amelio or "Perspective made easy" by Norling. They are both fun and effective to understand perspective.
    I am not too sure what am I looking at with number 3 that you selected, but damn I am so confused how I screwed up the alignment... damn...

    Also number 2 is what gets me, I still don't understand why those lines on that wall don't converge towards the vanishing point :/

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    Quote Originally Posted by DreadStunLock View Post
    How did you calculate the line positioning of the wall with the tunnel that leads water through? If it's 1 point perspective....aren't they meant to converge into that vanishing point? I am so confused I feel like you emulated another vanishing point somewhere :/ even though it looks...correct
    Ok, I see your problem, I've been there too few months ago. There is an infinity of vanishing points, it depends of the orientation of each parallel lines. I'm not sure I'm making myself clear so look at this and maybe you'll understand:

    Name:  Perspective.jpg
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    It's taken from one of the book I mentionned to you. Seriously, almost in every chapter you'll find an enlightening picture like this one. So read it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by StefRob View Post
    Ok, I see your problem, I've been there too few months ago. There is an infinity of vanishing points, it depends of the orientation of each parallel lines. I'm not sure I'm making myself clear so look at this and maybe you'll understand:

    Name:  Perspective.jpg
Views: 350
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    It's taken from one of the book I mentionned to you. Seriously, almost in every chapter you'll find an enlightening picture like this one. So read it!
    WHAT THE HELL!? I WANT TO CRY NOW T.T Why...What....that's not one point perspective though :'( the s**t

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    Don't worry. It's not as complicated as it seems at first. Working trough one of those books recommended will bring a lot of enlightenment.

    To answer your original question: if you want to use the red line as your horizon line, then the background should reflect that too. That doesn't mean you should see the back of the mountains, but it means that the horizon of your landscape is the same as the horizon you use for your perspective. You've drawn your landscape way lower than the red line. This should be moved up to the red line as shown in Zelda_geek's overpaint.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DreadStunLock View Post
    How did you calculate the line positioning of the wall with the tunnel that leads water through? If it's 1 point perspective....aren't they meant to converge into that vanishing point? I am so confused I feel like you emulated another vanishing point somewhere :/ even though it looks...correct
    One point perspective doesn't really mean there's only one vanishing point. It means you're looking straight at the object so that one set of lines are completely horizonal, one set is vertical, and one set goes to the middle vanishing point. The wall with the tunnel witch is angled will have a different set of vanishing points. I drew it by eye, estimating, but there is a way to determine the vanishing points accurately by use of the stationary point (the viewer). If you don't know how to do that, check out the books people have been recommending in this thread.

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    I will definitely look over these books and I am definitely going to keep this thread in my screenshots for future reference, thank you so much guys, for your help.

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    Name:  Boxes.jpg
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    What do you guys think? I've been taking the critiques really seriously and I think I achieved something plausible from at least my view, I haven't had the chance to get the books yet but just visually I was able to produce something.

    I still need to get the information from the books because the only thing that bugs me is why I can't put the vanishing point anywhere I want in order to place my object, for example placing a vanishing point above the boxes on the horizon line, it doesn't seem to work in terms of an angle of how the box will be positioned...

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    Quote Originally Posted by DreadStunLock View Post
    Name:  Boxes.jpg
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Size:  258.3 KB

    What do you guys think? I've been taking the critiques really seriously and I think I achieved something plausible from at least my view, I haven't had the chance to get the books yet but just visually I was able to produce something.

    I still need to get the information from the books because the only thing that bugs me is why I can't put the vanishing point anywhere I want in order to place my object, for example placing a vanishing point above the boxes on the horizon line, it doesn't seem to work in terms of an angle of how the box will be positioned...
    Hey, seems you've learned your lesson, at least partially. Nice job!
    About the issue you mention, if I get your problem right, the answer is that in a 2 vanishing points perspective the nearer are the 2 VP the weirder will be the object. If my memory is good this topic is covered in the Norling book, but I'm not so sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StefRob View Post
    Hey, seems you've learned your lesson, at least partially. Nice job!
    About the issue you mention, if I get your problem right, the answer is that in a 2 vanishing points perspective the nearer are the 2 VP the weirder will be the object. If my memory is good this topic is covered in the Norling book, but I'm not so sure.
    When you say partially right, does that mean partially as in my whole topic or is there a partial problem in my drawing?

    Also I made another slight update:

    Name:  UpdatedBoxes.jpg
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    Is this still correct? From my understanding these 2 new boxes will not be actually proportionate to a basic...box? Like a delivery box but they will be wonky, but still correct in terms of perspective and possible as a real life object?

    The red lines is where I am confused because if I add vanishing points to a different area but draw the box next to, does that make it a wrong perspective and I went something wrong or am I altering the shape and geometry of the box itself?

    Cheers

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    Last edited by DreadStunLock; December 21st, 2013 at 09:27 PM.
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    Also it attached a picture of my older work for some reason, I have no idea why, so my bad.

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    The vanishing points are not randomly placed on the horizon line. In the drawing above you made some of the boxes have not 90 degrees corners.
    Name:  perspective.png
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    Do they always have to be like 90 degrees? Are there any exceptions? Also, can you put it as far down on the vertical as you want, or is there a rule on where you can and cant place it?

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    They have to be 90 degrees if you intend to make the respective planes perpendicular to each other, so...yes.
    The distance from the station point (E) to the picture plane represents how far the viewer is from the picture plane. It essentially changes the amount of distortion.
    I also recommend to always construct the cone of vision (45-90 degrees, usually 60 degrees) and put the image inside this to avoid distortion, unless that's what you're going for.

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    Don't guess.
    Get the perspective book.
    Read it.
    Do the suggested exercises as you go along.
    Draw a lot of still lives and everyday objects from observation, applying knowledge from the book.
    Profit.

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