Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SEA, WA
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    260
    Thanked 194 Times in 160 Posts

    Making friends when you're older?

    Anyone have any experience, wisdom, and/or encouragement for people who are trying to make long lasting friends at an older-ish age (post 30)? My wife and I are finding that it's getting harder and harder to just meet new people in general, but then we're also finding it harder to just hold on to those people as close friends afterwards. Everyone seems to be either moving away, going back to school (no time to spare for friends), having kids (again, no time to spare), or, people just aren't that receptive to meeting complete strangers and befriending them...

    This is sort of a depressing topic, I know, but it's one that is becoming more and more of a reality for me and my wife...and I don't like it and I want to find a way to combat it. I feel kind of dumb for making a post about this, but in the moment I felt compelled

    Thanks for your time.
    -I often post from my phone; so please excuse the typos
    Sketchbook


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Scandinavian - Denmark
    Posts
    139
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
    Hallo Syle

    I do not know if I can be of the very great help since I myself am an introvert person. and therefore do not really need so much friends contact.

    But many times it is about finding common interests with other people, and this is not only drawing. and that your old friends do not have much time more you can not do anything about. but you could try to meet some people who may be at the same level as you when it comes to time and interests

    but you must also remember that friendships are something that can take time to shape. and must also be careful not to seem desperate for it, people can sense right away and then they back out.
    Maybe take some evening classes there are plenty of opportunities to meet new people.

    know it's not helping much,
    That Which Does Not Kill Us Makes Us Stranger

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,430
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    I have no advice for making friends, I probably have less than a dozen friends on Earth. ( For the purposes of the discussion, I will define "friend" as a non relative, who if they were to drop dead, I would feel really sad about it and go to the funeral..)
    Mrs Flake is quite the social butterfly so I have all the casual acquaintances I could ever need.

    Anyway, I was more thinking of old friends from back in the day and the importance of keeping up with them.
    Now realistically as you get older all your best mates will eventually get married, move to another city / country, go off to Uni, join the Foreign Legion, that kind of thing.
    It is utterly impossible for you all to hang out every weekend like you used to do..

    Obviously there will be events ( social obligations even) that draw you all back together from all corners of the Earth "Hey Bob's getting married, we need to go back to the mothership for the weekend" and these are fun but fairly infrequent.

    What we've found to be quite good is just to arrange these things anyway, whether there was a wedding / funeral / trial or not. ie just have everyone meet in a convenient city and catch up, think of it as a school / college reunion but you actually genuinely like everyone there.

    Now I don't mean phone your old mates and demand they show up in a foreign country 12 pm next Friday, I mean chat informally and arrange to meet up somewhere accessible and affordable 6-12 months from now.
    If it coincides with someones Birthday or a Wedding or a music Festival or "Joe who normally works in South America has a two day stopover in Manchester" or something, great, use that as a reason.
    A years notice should be enough for most people to arrange time off work, parents can fob the kids off on the grandparents for the weekend and that is a lot of time to find a cheap flight to wherever the meetup is.
    Worst case scenario: Nobody else bothers to show and you and the missus are in a nice hotel in a strange new city for the weekend. How romantic

    If someone in your group simply cannot afford any of this, you can give them fair warning then you all turn up in their city with a car full of booze and cake.

    I get that this is a slight tangent to what you were asking but to me old friends are the ones really worth keeping and I'd rather hang out with them once a year than any number of "acquaintances" every day.
    It's an effort, my last one involved two buses, one plane and one automobile and I loathe travelling but it's worth it.
    It's always brilliant fun once you actually get there.


    I know this sounds like a lot of effort, but I remember going to many a stag party or spacey weekend organised solely via land lines, word of mouth and snail mail, in this era of instant communication and satnav it's really not hard.

    Well, that ended up longer than I'd intended..I was just passing through and having arranged the latest "old pals meetup" less than a day ago, the subject was fresh in my mind..

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,504
    Thanks
    3,149
    Thanked 6,558 Times in 2,766 Posts
    I have a handful of friends that I've known for 30 years or more. Priorities change and life can get in the way; you just have to be proactive about it and flexible. I think social media is a distraction in a lot of ways. I've had lots of old friends contact me from my 20's only to find out we share nothing in common anymore. My real friends keep in touch with me by phone sometimes only once a year but the bonds are strong anyway.
    I know in my own life as I get older I am less tolerant of people in general which is not conducive to making new friends. I find I have a lot of new acquaintances that I like but we're just too different in too many ways to become really close friends. There is an old saying that as we age we get more intolerant and less desirable to others.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,628
    Thanks
    2,518
    Thanked 2,593 Times in 1,617 Posts
    Go to events of small to medium size (workshops, lectures, exhibitions, concerts, open-doors days, professional meetings, whatever) on topics that interest you, meet people there, invite the most interesting people home for tea, cultivate the relationship or let them drop off according to your taste.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SEA, WA
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    260
    Thanked 194 Times in 160 Posts
    Thanks for the replies everyone. It's really given me some food for thought. I'm also an introvert at heart, but I also really miss my old friendships, and I think I am so nostalgic for them that I feel the need to have that same sense of deep friendship with people I meet nowadays.

    Sort of a side note, and one that dpaint touched upon, but does anyone get the feeling sometimes that social media and the internet in general has stunted their ability to communicate with people in the real world?
    -I often post from my phone; so please excuse the typos
    Sketchbook

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Scandinavian - Denmark
    Posts
    139
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
    Yes social media has definitely taken away the need to meet and talk to your friends. since you everyday can check on them what they are doing. so facebook can also take away the need to have human contact. and it is just a trend that will continues when it becomes more normal.

    I do not have many friends! but I have a friend I meet over a cup of coffee and talk about everything under the sun, we also have been good friends for 10 years. but also got some new acquaintances a year ago when I was inverted for role playing D & D.
    but I would also like to emphasize that the people I know do not really use facebook or other social media.
    That Which Does Not Kill Us Makes Us Stranger

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,492
    Thanks
    307
    Thanked 410 Times in 310 Posts
    I was going to suggest something similar to Arenhaus. Go to events for what you're into - art galleries, conventions etc, and get to know the people there. Maybe you'll make friends, maybe you wont, but at least you'll all have something in common.

    Personally, I'm a lot like dpaint. I have a few good friends who I've kept in contact with over the years. And even though they have families or other commitments, we make the time to get together about once a year to catch up. I'm not really bothered about losing the people I used to be friends with - lives change and people move on and there's no point in hanging onto friendships that don't stand the test of time.

    Re the social networking thing. I don't know because I don't use it much - only recently joined Facebook during CA's downtime for updates. But I think it depends on how you use it. If people use it for all their socialising but don't bother with real life interaction, then yeah, it'll get in the way and could cause people to get lazy about actual face to face communication. Mind you, a lot of people in my family use Facebook even though they all live in the same area, but it doesn't seem to have stunted their communication at all. They're as loud and talkative together as they always were, lol.

    As for making friends being harder as you get older? Possibly. I'm pretty happy in my own company so I don't often bother trying to befriend people. Someone might come along once in a while who I think is really cool and I'll make the effort to get to know them, but so far, only one has stuck. Sometimes I wonder if I should try harder but I don't know. My life seems pretty full friendwise so I don't think I've got room for too many more.

    I just go with the flow man, lol.

    Hope you find what you're looking for, Syle.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,248
    Thanks
    1,199
    Thanked 1,237 Times in 797 Posts
    Have you used Meetup.com? I get the impression that it's mostly used by people in your age group who are looking for people with common interests to hang out with. http://www.meetup.com/find/?allMeetu...8&sort=default

    Re: the social networking topic, Facebook is the purgatory of old friendships that should have died out a long time ago, but you can't remove them from your friends list because what if they notice and send you a sobby message or tell so-and-so that you hate them now or whatever. If we were really friends, we wouldn't be talking on Facebook.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    1,953
    Thanked 524 Times in 356 Posts
    I don't feel like I need friends, but I have a couple of points for why I will not pursue a possible friendship further:

    1. Not keeping appointments with no notice as to why you failed to show up - instant removal from contacts.
    2. Not a rational personality type (Jungian) - not always, but often. I find that if there are already conflicts in the relationship, the wrong personality type can make it ten times worse.

    one of the keys to this is just listening to them. You are selling yourself, so learn some sales techniques. these techniques apply to everyday life situations
    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    USA CA
    Posts
    2,239
    Thanks
    2,287
    Thanked 904 Times in 506 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Syle View Post
    but I also really miss my old friendships, and I think I am so nostalgic for them that I feel the need to have that same sense of deep friendship with people I meet nowadays.
    “All relationships are temporary. Every single one of them ends. Sorry to depress you, but you know it’s true. As much as we want eternal friendship, we can’t have it.

    Think of all the people who were once in your life but no longer are. Where are they? Where did they go? Why are they gone?

    Some relationships lasted longer than others, but none of them lasted. And neither will the ones we’re in today. Like it or not, this is how it’s supposed to be.”

    -Jamie Richards

    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    There is an old saying that as we age we get more intolerant and less desirable to others.
    Sad but true at times. In high school, people will generally like you, if you like the back. But as we get older, we put up these walls and requirements to even accept a person into their social circle. (The importance of job status, income, vs a person being just a decent human being and sharing similar hobbies)
    Last edited by Brian Luk; August 3rd, 2013 at 09:55 PM.
    Make a sketchbook happy, feed it a tip to improve!

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=85628

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    373
    Thanks
    59
    Thanked 65 Times in 62 Posts
    About your friends with kids who have no time. I can relate from the parents' side. I have no time since I have a kid. I still like to do things with friends, and not necessarily with kids all the time. But realistically, here are some hints to maintaining relationships with busy parents when you don't have kids:

    1. Meet where it is easy for them to bring their kids. For example, join them for an hour or two outdoors at a playground. The kids usually leave you alone that way and you might even have time to talk. If they have babies, go for walks together where they can easily bring a stroller. Or if their kids have activities, the parents may have an hour or two between drop off and pick-up. Maybe suggest meeting them at a place nearby.

    2. Don't expect them to make plans over the phone. Email, text, or whatever electronic ways you can use to keep in touch and make appointments. It's just easier to plan that way.

    3. If you really like to meet them without kids, maybe meet after their kid's bedtime. Sometimes, I will meet some friends at a coffee shop later at night when my husband is home with the kiddo. This of course doesn't work if you like to meet as couples. But in that case, they might be open to have you visit for a while after the kids' bedtime.

    4. Don't expect them to get a babysitter. As easy as this sounds, it is surprisingly complicated and expensive and requires a lot of advance planning.

    5. Know that your friends who are now parents (most likely) don't intentionally neglect your relationship, but time becomes very precious and it is simply impossible to be as spontaneous as before.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SEA, WA
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    260
    Thanked 194 Times in 160 Posts
    Thanks a lot everyone.
    -I often post from my phone; so please excuse the typos
    Sketchbook

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SPACE, MUTHAFLIPPER
    Posts
    1,497
    Thanks
    2,744
    Thanked 1,045 Times in 379 Posts
    There's a handful of childhood friends that I barely get online contact with (mainly because they use a social media network that I'm not used to) and one of them had a child just recently and I'm like... whoa. I just feel out of touch with my old friends. I keep telling myself I'll visit them but it's like what do I say? A lot has changed in a few years.

    Edit: Oh wait I'm supposed to give advice but um... ._. Uh...

    Just keep it cool... I guess.

    ._.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,844
    Thanks
    2,664
    Thanked 1,049 Times in 686 Posts
    I have exactly 7 friends.

    1 I'm related to.

    I made these friends in my late 20's and they stuck, so I can call them close.

    The common theme between us all, they are all writers (except for one: I kicked myself into her life because I saw in her parts of myself and knew my life experience could help her through the trials that she was going through), because I too was a writer and met them when I joined an organization of writers who held events. Writers had books signings & conventions to which I attended. I know a lot of writers, some who are quite successful, and if time and distance weren't an issue, I'd most likely be friends, friends with. But the core 7 are in the five boroughs of NYC, so we either call, go to a movie, or text.

    Establishing yourself in someone's life is difficult because their life could be more mobile or unstable than yours, which in my case, was always the issue, but when there is time to spend time, and they are able, you make that time, and bond in the time allotted, making the best of it.

    That's why I have the 7 that I have. I was the friend I never had. I'd take a bullet for them, as they would for me. I made it a point to deal with only those types and believe me, I spent YEARS of trial and error to discover who that type of person is and how to recognize them.

    How to make friends? I'd say start from a common interest and go from there. Long lasting friendships is part effort, part understanding/accepting, & part freefall because trust can be an issue if you've been shit on by everyone for most of your life (raises hand out of experience).
    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    1,953
    Thanked 524 Times in 356 Posts
    Also remember one of the key points in getting people to like you: People like you if you like them, so show it! Don't be repressed

    Also I should have said earlier, I don't feel like I need MORE friends. Come to think of it, life would be pretty dull without all of the friends I already have, I mean, not to say I couldn't live without them, but we're all pretty close.

    Hobbies, of any kind are major glue for friends, btw.
    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    1,953
    Thanked 524 Times in 356 Posts
    Okay so here's an example of a successful friendship being forged by an older person, from my life, recently.

    I work a lot with artists in my line of work, so we get this guy who comes in that's a woodworker. He is an amazing artist, and makes some incredible rare wood works that are functional as well. Not a really good looking guy, just got through a battle with cancer and plus he's a Christian, and everyone knows I really hate talking to Christians most of the time. They're completely bonkers and it's like they're in a big weird gang/cult. And he's one of those crazier Christians that actually believes in the Bible word for word as the word of God, even after I explained to him the Torah was written in Babylon by Jews with PTSD, and not God. (book of lamentations, hello PTSD) He's probably in his mid fifties. He is just really damned nice though, and witty. So I'm basically always nice to people if they're reasonably polite and a lot of people want to be my friend, but I feel weird about it and I tend to avoid friendships most of the time because they don't understand what I do or the things I'm into. Normally I would not want to be friends with this guy, but he obviously needed a friend and has a lot of life experience. I enjoy talking to him because I learn a lot about exotic wood and construction and he's very laid back which balances out my hi strung nature. So one of these days I'll probably have his wife and him over for dinner, which is against all odds:

    * Don't want new friends not into whatever the fuck it is that I do
    * He's a Christian
    * I have no time for my current BFF's

    Passion attracts people, if you're passionate about your work/hobby people will naturally be interested. Friendships are grown at the point where you actually care about their health and every stupid thing that happens to them - that's love. So you love and care for your friends.

    Tolerance is another big deal. Example, Christian Carpenter Bible Junkie tolerates my weirdness, just as I accept his irrational religious attitudes.

    I also think that being able to understand when a friend is going through a busy time helps. Wait it out and be there for them in any way you can, if that's Facebook, fine. A very close friend I have here in town has been in school getting his Master's in programming and I mean, I rarely see him. When I do see him he's stressed out because he works for stupid kids in Seattle (although he makes a ton of money) and he's constantly studying. He just graduated and we're still friends. We still had dinner parties together, through it. Spouses help a lot, if one is busy and the other not. His wife is terminally ill with Chronic Fatigue (AKA the epidemic big insura are suppressing in a big way) so I mean, it's hard all around. She seems to think she lost a lot of friends because of the illness, and that's what I call a fair weather friend. I'm not into that so I find friendship a big responsibility, which is why I'm reluctant to make new friends. I feel like you know, friends are really just bros from another ho, and you have to look after them.

    :>
    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra

  19. #18
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    14,070
    Thanks
    4,224
    Thanked 6,733 Times in 4,639 Posts
    It's not harder as you get get older, but you become more discerning with what you want from a friend. Some take longer to identify than others.

    I reckon I've made a few good friends on the internet, and I've met a couple of them too, talked to others on the phone. The rest I'd really like to meet sometime. I don't chat openly on forums, FB etc, but via pm or skype. I type quickly and blurt out what I want to say, people take me as I am. Nor do I see eye to eye all the time, but that just adds to a friendship.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    226
    Thanks
    127
    Thanked 148 Times in 78 Posts
    I completely sympathize. I just moved in May and I'm dealing with this too and it's a little scary. But I agree that it's way harder to meet people and! keep friendships going as an adult. Being quiet and introverted doesn't really help me either, hehe.
    "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step."
    Lao-tzu, Chinese philosopher (604 BC - 531 BC)

    My SketchBook.

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    233
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 41 Times in 41 Posts
    Hey there! I'd say that your best bet is to sign up for some kind of weekly activity. You'll see the same bunch of people week after week and you'll have at least one common interest. I guess you're pretty busy (I still 18 so I really don't know what it's like to be a full grown-up with a house and kids) but I think it's really important that you make time for friends. If you DO have time but people your age generally don't... well, why not make older or younger friends then? But really: activities... I'd recommend D&D and LARP but I don't know if you're into that stuff. I've found you build friendships faster at sports stuff though, with my Judo group everyone was my pal from the first day on, it's kind of a magical thing really.

    As for the internet thing, I only use the internet for art resources and always make an effort to meet my friends in real life as often as I can (for example, I moved to another city for university but I come home every weekend even though I have to save money for the trip and finish all my school assignments during the week so I can spend the weekend entirely with the people I love). I meet with my LARP and Martial Arts groups physically too so there's really no point in using the internet to communicate with them.
    Shoulder to the wheel, my friend!
    My sketchbook - Harsh critique always welcome!

  22. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Syle View Post
    Sort of a side note, and one that dpaint touched upon, but does anyone get the feeling sometimes that social media and the internet in general has stunted their ability to communicate with people in the real world?
    TOTALLY! Man, it's made it so much harder for me at least. That and texting. Texting is very useful, but I feel like it severely disrupts real communication so much of the time. My wife, who has never been particularly outgoing, always falls back on texting because she gets nervous about talking to people on the phone or face to face. It's like, just give them a call! Yet I find myself doing it too sometimes. So impersonal...

    Anyway, as far as making friends goes, I was having similar difficulties in my late 20s, well out of school and with my old friends from "back in the day" moving away and such. Two things helped me: First, not limiting my friendships to people of my own age. My wife and I have some friends now that are in their 70's. We have dinner sometimes and watch baseball and such. Sure our experiences and goals aren't completely aligned, but they really are friends to us. And maybe 5 years ago I wouldn't have considered having friends twice my age.

    The other thing that helped us a lot was from our church. Recently we had an influx of younger (25-35) folks, and it's been awesome having people our age we can hang out with and talk about "nothing" stuff with, or also talk about deep important stuff with. Our church is only like 20 people, and previously it was mostly older folks, so it was a nice surprise that in about a year's span 10 new people showed up and they were all our age. (And hey, you and your wife might BE one of those new people someone is waiting for! I was so grateful when they showed up.) If you're not into any particular community faith, another similar option might be volunteering. We helped out with a group we didn't know from a local college at a homeless/transition shelter, and we met some really cool people.

    And one of the nice things ABOUT the social media stuff is you can keep in touch more easily. You just have to remember talking online isn't the same as cultivating and giving attention to a relationship. So invite them to the zoo, or dinner, or just to a movie or something sometimes.

    It can be tough when you're pining for friends. I've been there (and will probably be again someday) but it's also super important. We need friends and other relationships, it's built into us and how we function. So keep at it, I hope you find what you need.

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Singapore / New Haven, CT
    Posts
    789
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 352 Times in 324 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Izi View Post
    You are selling yourself, so learn some sales techniques. these techniques apply to everyday life situations
    ...I don't know about that. friendship isn't a sales pitch.

    btw, good thread. I've wondered about this a bit despite not even being 21 yet. Comes with doing uni overseas and having to move home again afterwards, I guess. Especially when the people you meet at uni are people whose wavelengths are completely different from at home and you love it.
    Last edited by krysjez; August 17th, 2013 at 11:46 AM.
    Sketchbook

    NaidyBlack SpotEyestrainVK

    “This is [...] where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares.” --Jason Rainville

  24. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Olympia, WA USA
    Posts
    2,139
    Thanks
    1,953
    Thanked 524 Times in 356 Posts
    A pitch is only one selling technique. There are others. The "pitch" in a blossoming friendship is bragging. Why should I take time to invest in our relationship? Bragging about your accomplishments can get the attention of people who would otherwise pass through your life. Appearance is often the sales pitch for plenty of people who don't care about things like talent or intelligence. So whether you like it or not, you're advertising. What is your campaign saying? What would you think of you?

    Here's an example of someone who was seemingly desperate to be my friend. He was scattered, an artist who was kind of a shitty student artist - which by the way I don't blame him for, and didn't know what he would do from one week to the next. We had him over for dinner once, then seemed to want to keep in contact, but stood us up twice. After the first time he ran after me at a bookstore to catch my attention, so I could ask "Um you know you stood us up right?" Then he announced he was moving to start some awful business idea and dropping out of the college we were going to be teaching at. He pushed another dinner date on us which I was really put on the spot to say yes to, regretably "Sure I always love playing hostess three times in a row"

    He didn't show up and I was glad.

    I was basically like "DO NOT NEED FLAKY BUSINESSLY INEPT PERSON WHO WANTS FREE MEALS IN MY LIFE" his sales pitch basically advertised to me he was a loser, and not a very considerate one.

    I will consider new friends, but if you stand me up, like I said, you're getting removed from my FB page. I don't have the time to spend on people who waste my time. That's not a friend.Sales pitch or not, you collect friends based on what you want to bring into your life. I will bring losers into my life if they agree to follow the "decrees of my realm" or whatever. IE don't talk about Islam or Jesus and don't flood the bathroom after you take a shower.

    And also, I think lately there has been a whole trend of antisocial paranoia going around. The inferior humans all think the Illuminati is going to take over the planet and they're all worked up about that, and the rest of them are watching the Kardashians. In between we have a new subspecies emerging that is figuring out they have more than just opposable thumbs....It's all a little scary I think...too many divisive issues... so friendships are a complication people are often shutting down to.
    Last edited by Izi; August 21st, 2013 at 10:54 PM.
    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra

Similar Threads

  1. SketchBook: My older work
    By Johnathan Static in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: March 20th, 2012, 08:02 AM
  2. SketchBook: older sb
    By BranFlakes in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: October 24th, 2008, 07:52 PM
  3. making new friends
    By grifter51 in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 16th, 2008, 10:18 AM
  4. "Making Friends" WIP
    By VuDu Pencils in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: December 21st, 2005, 08:16 PM
  5. Online friends vs Real Life Friends.
    By Blue in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: October 13th, 2005, 12:29 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.