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  1. #1
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    Need some feedback/advice

    Hey all!
    I'm 26 and been drawing since I was very young and by the age of 15 I was pretty good for my age. When I was about 17 I lost my confidence and love for it and have been on and off since then. I have found my love of art again and have started to draw regularly but I want to improve and I want to improve at a faster rate than I have been. My work pretty much goes from recent at the top of the post and oldest at the bottom, I don't get much constructive criticism so please fire some at me

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  3. #2
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    Your portraits at the top look pretty good to me, although I'm not the best with portraits myself. I can spot a few minor issues, but overall they look good. Drawing faces without a direct reference is an entirely different story though in my experience, and I think the mistakes are a little easier to spot in the fictional/cartoon images.

    Your portraits are definitely stronger than your full-body gestures/poses, and the more of the body that is shown in your images, the more seems to distract from an otherwise better drawn face. To my knowledge, the only way to get better at these is to keep practicing and do as many as you can. The best way is to take a figure drawing class with live models in my opinion, since drawing from life helps you to think about your drawing more in terms of three dimensional shapes rather than mimicking lines onto paper. Even in a still pose, the best models inevitably move slightly off from where they were when they started the pose, forcing you to compensate and draw the basic shapes as they relate to each other vs. drawing from a photo and being able to copy line angles and distances directly.

    If that isn't an option, you might just try it from photos (trying as many different poses/angles as you can) and try to think about the drawing more in terms of shapes rather than lines. There might be other avenues to look into as well (youtube videos of people sitting still/posing? livestreams with models? I don't know... seems weird, but it might exist).

    For the cartoon/anime characters, I would focus a bit more on line quality or try to learn the pen tool in a program like illustrator, photoshop, or I think GIMP has one too (which is a free program). The lines feel a little squiggly and weak. When using pens/paper, one way to remedy this is to go over the lines again making them vary in thickness to better draw attention to different areas of the piece. It's difficult to explain here, but there are some great tutorials for this on deviantart. Even the ones that focus on the pen tool will often show you what I mean. It's a matter of making the line strokes taper (thick to thin, think to thick) to better communicate what you're going for. You kind of have it going on in with Envy's eyes, since they're thicker and taper towards the corners. Although they get a big squiggly again at the bottom, it definitely creates a more dynamic effect. The other great things about the pen tool is that it is also great at creating large shapes to fill for the various shades and doesn't require a tablet to use it effectively. A lot of pen tool artists will sketch or do all the linework on paper, then scan it into the computer and color it.

    One last thing. Your Envy piece is pretty awesome. The pose and downward perspective is really eye catching. The biggest problem with it though are the fingers. They are noticeably too small for the palms they are attached to. Obviously the arms/hands would be smaller than normal since you're going for the top-down perspective, but they still need to stay proportional to each other.

    Sorry my critique is so long, but I hope it helps.

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  4. #3
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    Thanks a lot you're critique wasn't too long at all. You're definitely right about my lines, must be down to my confidence with a pen. For my figure drawing I use online pictures and sketch them from there, portraits are definitely my strongest area and I neglected figure drawing for many years. Thanks again you were very helpful

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  5. #4
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    Seems as you're working mostly from photo. See, the problem that brings is that instead of a 2D render of a 3D object, you're doing a 2D render of a 2D render of a 3D object. This makes your drawings look flat. Even with your portraits, which have a really nice render, look as if you would be drawing outlines, not shapes, this makes your eyes or your mouth not resting in the skull where they should.

    Draw some objects from life, ask a friend to sit for you in 5 to 10 minutes intervals, check how the skull structure works. You will learn at a much faster pace.

    気計 - Quike
    "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift. That is why it is called the present.."

    The Spaniard's Sketchbook... No holds barred
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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quike Garcia View Post
    Seems as you're working mostly from photo. See, the problem that brings is that instead of a 2D render of a 3D object, you're doing a 2D render of a 2D render of a 3D object. This makes your drawings look flat. Even with your portraits, which have a really nice render, look as if you would be drawing outlines, not shapes, this makes your eyes or your mouth not resting in the skull where they should.

    Draw some objects from life, ask a friend to sit for you in 5 to 10 minutes intervals, check how the skull structure works. You will learn at a much faster pace.
    Yeah I think you are spot on there, any particular objects you think are good for studying? Apples etc? Thanks a lot for your feedback

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