Figure Studies - Critique Needed

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  1. #1
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    Figure Studies - Critique Needed

    Recently I started working on figure studies in an attempt to get better at quickly and accurately reproducing the human figure.

    I know it takes a long time and many many hours of work to become skilled at this, but I was wondering if anyone could spot systematic errors that I need to work on.

    Don't sugar-coat comments. Criticism is the only way I'll improve. Thanks in advance for the advice and help.

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  3. #2
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    Well straight away, the most noticeable thing is how you seem to make the arms thinner and thinner as you get towards the hand, thereby making the hand smaller than it should be. Time to start working on volume, attached a page from Loomis to illustrate what I mean.

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  4. #3
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    Technique-wise these are fine, and you have some feeling for the body mass, but... your lay-in is too often out of proportion or stiff. The problems are not with the finish or anatomical details, they are with the most basic structure.

    Recommendation: stop drawing in detail for a while, switch to gesture drawing, learn to draw the figure loosely but with accurate mass, foreshortening and proportions.

    Book recommendation: "Force: Dynamic Life Drawing for Animators" by Mattesi.

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  5. #4
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    If you're drawing from life, do 3 or 5 minute poses rather than long ones. Forget about rendering. If you cannot have them that short, move around the model and try several angles.

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    Beautiful lines and shading. Now proportions like suggested! With every drawing, but specially those with foreshortening, don't trust your judgment of how long or wide things are. Do some sight measuring, and draw from life as much as possible.

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  7. #6
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    Updated with More Material!

    I did another round of sketches. I feel like these are getting better. I tried to focus on proportions as much as possible as well as weight and the forces acting on the figure. More feedback please (if it's not too much trouble):

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