Paints on paper, mounted on board

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    Paints on paper, mounted on board

    I've been looking up this method for over a week now and can't find any steps or tutorials on how to go about painting over paper.

    I came across Annie Stegg's work and noticed that for some of her paintings, she draws the initial sketch on Bristol board, gets the sketch blown up or photocopied at a printing shop, mounts the photocopy onto board and then paints over it in oils or acrylics. I really like the finish on her paintings and I'm desperate to know the whole process. I'm wondering how the surface of the paper doesn't disintegrate or warp etc.

    Does anybody have any advice on how to go about this method? Thank you!

    Oh, and a little extra question whilst I'm here. Is it ok to paint onto rolled canvas which hasn't been stretched, could I just glue it to wood panel once it's finished?

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    Any surface you paint on with oils must be sized first to prevent the material from rotting or molding later. Paper and illustration board is never recommended for oils without some type of sizing. If you insist on using paper get paper that is acid free rag or linen. I've seen oil illustrations from the 40's and 50's that are rotting with mold or burning from the acidic chemical reactions in the board. Just because someone else does it doesn't mean their not an idiot when it comes to proper material care. Mounting canvas after the fact on panel is fine as long as the canvas was properly prepared with size and gesso or primer.

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    Oils will rot the unsized cellulose support in a few years. Paper or board or canvas must be at least sealed with glue before applying oils.

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    Ah, I see, thanks. Is acrylic a safer option if I were to work on paper? And will the correct sizing glue dry transparent over the sketch on paper? I've never worked with paint before so I have a ton of questions.

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    Acrylic is of course safer, but using acrylics on paper is maddening because it dries almost instantly on the soft paper surface. You can safely use oils on paper if you buy a nice quality 100% cotton paper like Arches Oil Paper which is already sized and ready to use. Or you could buy 100% cotton illustration board and size and gesso it yourself {I use Crescent heavy weight illustration board, it's awesome!}.

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    Many pros use acrylic (or oil) on paper... the process boils down to affixing your paper drawing (or printout, whatever) to a solid backing with something clear that will allow you to see the drawing and still take the paints. Very often that something is acrylic gel medium. You can paint either oil or acrylic on top of that. Coat it well... The medium adheres your paper to the board as well as sealing it for the paints on top.

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    This is Donatos process He seals the paper fully so no oil touches it important that! He uses Strathmore 500 100% cotton.

    http://www.donatoart.com/technique/m.../mounting.html

    "If you look back on last years work and you still like it: you are slipping."
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    If the paper is not 100 percent archival sealing it doesn't do squat. paper is a horrible surface to work on for oil painting and putting oils over acrylics is stupid. I don't care who does it. Illustrators are terrible at archival solutions for their work. That's why paintings by Norman Rockwell and Maxfield Parrish to name just two illustrators, have paintings that are coming apart less than 100 years after they painted them. Take the time and spend a little more money to learn proper conservation techniques for your work. To not do that means you just think your work is shit and not worth preserving in the first place.

    Last edited by dpaint; August 8th, 2013 at 08:46 PM.
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    Armand is Strathmore not 100% archival? If it's not I'll switch to another paper, or just transfer straight onto the prepared board! I suppose the reason He uses it as it can pass through a copier machine, but your right its no good if its going to fall apart down the line!

    Do you have any brand recommendations that might be better alternative you mentioned acid free rag or linen?

    best,
    Ant

    "If you look back on last years work and you still like it: you are slipping."
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    Quote Originally Posted by AvP View Post
    I don't care who does it. Illustrators are terrible at archival solutions for their work.
    You are correct, sir... though to be fair, the OP said nothing about looking for an archival solution.

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    I don't know about Strathmore papers being completely archival for oils. Looking at their site they don't offer any papers specifically for oil painting, that may be a clue right there. On their paper chart they don't give oils the highest rating for their papers or illustration board.
    http://www.strathmoreartist.com/tl_f...edia_guide.pdf

    I don't work on paper with oils ever. Acrylics should be fine if you seal them with medium the way you've described. The best thing to do with oils would be to work on sized and primed linen or cotton canvas and attach that to a strong support. If you don't like the texture of a weave then work straight on a prepared support of your choice.

    I understand people want to save time redrawing things, I did it too when I was working at Lucas doing backgrounds for games. We would make photocopies of the drawings and glue them to crescent board, seal them with matte medium and paint in acrylics on top, but we never told people it was archival or a good solution for permanence. It was fast and cheap, and cut out the redrawing step to the board which took as much time as the paintings sometimes. It was perfect for a production environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CCThrom View Post
    You are correct, sir... though to be fair, the OP said nothing about looking for an archival solution.
    That's fair you're right they didn't ask for that. I am just pointing out pros do things for reasons that aren't necessarily the right ones. Freelancing is tough and we cut corners where we can to make ends meet. Because illustration and production art is about the image and not about the physical original, illustrators do things that don't support long term care. That's okay but people starting out think its something its not

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    dpaint, your point is important and well taken. I will definitely add more disclaimer to fast and loose technique advice.

    "Change is a virtue my friend... if you want to escape, all you have to do is make up your mind."
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    I don't know about Strathmore papers being completely archival for oils. Looking at their site they don't offer any papers specifically for oil painting, that may be a clue right there. On their paper chart they don't give oils the highest rating for their papers or illustration board.
    http://www.strathmoreartist.com/tl_f...edia_guide.pdf

    I don't work on paper with oils ever. Acrylics should be fine if you seal them with medium the way you've described. The best thing to do with oils would be to work on sized and primed linen or cotton canvas and attach that to a strong support. If you don't like the texture of a weave then work straight on a prepared support of your choice.

    I understand people want to save time redrawing things, I did it too when I was working at Lucas doing backgrounds for games. We would make photocopies of the drawings and glue them to crescent board, seal them with matte medium and paint in acrylics on top, but we never told people it was archival or a good solution for permanence. It was fast and cheap, and cut out the redrawing step to the board which took as much time as the paintings sometimes. It was perfect for a production environment.
    Thanks for that good to know!

    "If you look back on last years work and you still like it: you are slipping."
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