Why should I paint?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 51
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,435 Times in 747 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Why should I paint?

    Alright so maybe I am overthinking things lately, and maybe not...but I recently have been coming back to the question of "Why? why paint?".

    Before I had always been satisfied with my answer of "to make a pretty picture", that is, I always was interested in the aesthetic side of things, the technical (and I still am greatly interested in this). There was no such thing as emotion in artwork, since it was all composed of patches of light and colour (emotion itself cannot exist within a pigment), so painting is just that, making blobs of paint or pixels. End of story. All I was interested in was the technique, studying light and anatomy and so forth.

    Now I am questioning this, it seems to me like a very closeminded view. I remember Andrew Wyeth said "to be interested solely in technique would be very superficial to me", and I never got that until recently. I am beginning to see that brushwork and technical skill are not ends but rather means to ends. Art is about conveying an emotion or expression or idea...it is a mere vehicle. Emotion in art is very real, though not always a tangible thing that can be identified clearly (sometime certain things like soft edges will convey certain moods, and other times no technical thing can be identified as setting that emotion). And it is more important than technical things. Why is it that so often a perfectly executed painting is less interesting or feels dead, and another painting lacking technical skills (or at least not at a full mastery of everything there such as anatomy or something) will be more interesting and have a strong impact, despite its perfections? So this brings me to my question--what am I trying to say or get across? And I cannot answer this. I have nothing to say. So why speak? Why paint?

    Maybe I am misunderstanding all of this too, I don't know really. Even in those rare artists who do project pure emotion through their artwork (there are not many who I feel this from, Andrew Wyeth and Jeff Jones are two examples, though I strain to think of more off the top of my head), how much of that can be understood beyond just a feeling of raw emotion? How much of it is intentional? Is there a specific thing they are trying to convey, or is it incidental, and they are just making pictures? How do I get this in my work? What should I be trying to say? What is all of this anyways (Harold Speed talks of "dither" in The Practice and Science of Drawing, though it is hard to define and discuss given how elusive it is and how subtle and changing)? Does illustration need to say anything anyways, or is this thought process limited to fine art? Is there such thing as an "artist" vs an "Artist", if so, what separates them? Is it enough to be just satisfied with making pictures, and enjoying the process? SHOULD I be satisfied with just that?

    Despite all of this, I am still very attracted to the technical, though my tastes are shifting away from the Bouguereau and Gerome look towards the Zorn and Sargent and Cecilia Beau look (and some even looser things, such as Richard Schmid or Tibor Nagy). It seems that it is still the brushwork and technical that attracts me to these artists though (and perhaps I feel guilty for this?). Or maybe I am misinterpreting other things as mere technical brushwork, when there is more really going on...

    Sorry for the ramble, it is a bit of stream of consciousness thing running through my mind at 4am and I doubt it is very coherent...I'm not even sure how you guys would respond to this...but any thoughts on the matter would be interesting to hear and try to digest. I have a feeling that I will look back on this thread in a few years and really have a good laugh at the way of thinking presented here.

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Canada, ON, Toronto
    Posts
    512
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 168 Times in 157 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey Andrew , I was recently thinking the same thing with drawing or painting as well, why do we paint or draw? Well when you picked up that pencil basically you put yourself on a quest, an adventure there would always be no end may it be in mastery of technical skill or other things like portraying emotions or telling a story. There are really many perspectives to art but really if you want my opinion on why I paint or draw, perhaps this could be due to the stage I am at with it, is to simply have fun, make my mistakes, learn and enjoy whatever path I follow. I recently discovered this after a period of dissatisfaction with my work and I always asked myself why do I continue to draw if no matter how much I improve the dissatisfaction with the quality of work I am producing will remain mutual. You could be a bard on this journey who likes to tell tales and stories on your journey as an artist, you could be a wizard on this journey seeking wisdom and mastery of his artistry, you could be many things on your art journey seeking many different things from it. As long as your happy doing what you do that is all that counts really. If perhaps you are looking for a different reason or looking for something to fuel this conversation here is an interesting lecture and interview with Ian McCaig on story telling and illustration you could listen to while drawing. I found it to be quite interesting.



    CHECK OUT MY FRIEND'S SB OVAH HERE >> deer's sketchbook


    >>DeviantArt|SketchBook<<
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kamikazel33t For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    sweden
    Posts
    7,475
    Thanks
    1,696
    Thanked 1,219 Times in 624 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
99.9% of everything I've ever drawn or painted has held no meaning to it except for what I've given it in terms of technical mojomojo or "coolness". The meaning you find when looking at someones art is purely your own. It won't hold the exact same meaning to even two people. What I'm saying is that you're just over thinking stuff and should be drawing. Either that 0.1% will mean a lot more to you or it won't, it doesn't really matter. No matter how much meaning or story or whatever you bring into a painting, you can't put that entire image or idea, which is yours to begin with, into your viewers mind no matter how good you are technically or storytelling wise.

Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Dile_ For This Useful Post:


  • #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 18 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Maybe it's life experience you need to bring in more emotion. Some artists communicate emotions naturally while most do not I think. Just like there are some prodigies who take to technical abilities fantastically, but most of us don't. I feel like it's something we can learn and many do inadvertently and it shows eventually in their painting.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to wardrum For This Useful Post:


  • #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    1,490
    Thanks
    202
    Thanked 541 Times in 305 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Dile_ View Post
    The meaning you find when looking at someones art is purely your own.
    I think this cannot be stressed enough.
    As recipients of artwork- no matter if we're talking about a novel or an image- we take part in the process of creating "meaning". An author might be thinking a lot about "the meaning" and try to convey it, or not at all. That doesn't mean that the audience will understand or even care. On the other hand, a purely technical exercise, say a still life, might mean a lot to some recipients for some reason.

    As an additional note, in my experience the main difference between "an artist" and "an Artist" usually amounts to nothing more but pretentiousness on "the Artist's" part.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Benedikt For This Useful Post:


  • #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,725
    Thanks
    2,677
    Thanked 5,936 Times in 2,388 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    IMO art is communication, it is a language that training give you the skills to communicate with. What you want to say is up to you once you have the skills to speak. I think the best art has something of the speaker in it and it comes from a place of truth or understanding.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  • #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Why should you paint?
    To say what you cannot write or sing.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  • #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    455
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 49 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Please debunk this one ..still it will help for some.
    sometimes you should just start going mad on questions like these. I'm no good in it but here!
    If you think about it makes no sense!
    The only reason to paint is to answer the need.
    If the need is money you paint for money.
    If the reason is fulfillment the need is as well.
    if the reason is the need the need is itself.

    If you say I paint for no reason you need to have no
    reason ( and that's hard). Is this still about painting? No? Is your question?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Gibier For This Useful Post:


  • #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    470
    Thanks
    539
    Thanked 395 Times in 174 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    First of all, I checked out your work and it is expressive, particularly the linework in your figure drawings. But, maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're question is.

    A master artist can't help but be expressive even if they try. Once they've mastered their tools their personality, appetites, and temperaments come out. It's been said by someone (I can't remember who) that all great works of art are self-portraits. When you look at a painting of shoes by VanGogh you're really looking at a painting of VanGogh. When you look at a Rembrandt you're confronted with the personality of Rembrandt, regardless of the subject matter. Same with Uglow, Frazetta, Corot, Ingres, whomever. That's why no two great artists work looks alike. You could line up Rembrandt, Corot, Frazetta, Garcia Lopez, or whoever you want and have them paint the same subject. All their paintings will be great, but they'll also be completely different, because their differing temperaments and personalities will come through. Each will select different things they think are important and ignore those attributes that don't interest them. Look at a bunch of different artists and see what kind of mood they create. The mood from a Kathe Kollwitz or a Goya is very different than a Monet or Chardin. Why? What different choices are they making regarding shape design, value, color, etc? For your own work, that's your first question. "What mood/atmosphere do I want to create?" Most of these problems have already been solved, which is why looking at masterworks is helpful because you can see how master artists solved these problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post

    Why is it that so often a perfectly executed painting is less interesting or feels dead, and another painting lacking technical skills (or at least not at a full mastery of everything there such as anatomy or something) will be more interesting and have a strong impact, despite its perfections?
    This is something I don't get. What do you mean by a perfectly executed painting? Do you mean a painting that is essentially a Xerox copy of reality? A painting in which someone just mindlessly copied every stupid detail and made no decisions or selection as to what was important and what was irrelevant? So perfecly rendered it "looks just like a photo?" If that's what you mean, then that would not be a perfectly executed painting. In fact, I'd call that a bad painting. Take a look at this Chardin. This is, IMO, a perfectly executed painting. It's a complete statement. But, check it out, when you really look at it, there are no details. Those aren't flowers. That's paint. But each brushstroke is in the right place, the right shape, the right value, the right color, and it has a unity that wouldn't be there if he'd rendered out every nook and cranny and every silly highlight.

    I don't know if I really addressed your question, but I hope that helps.

    Name:  10vase.jpg
Views: 527
Size:  174.8 KB

    "Contrary to the belief of the layman, the essential of art is not to imitate nature, but under the guise of imitation to stir up excitement with pure plastic elements: measurements, directions, ornaments, lights, values, colors, substances, divided and organized according to the injunctions of natural laws. While so occupied, the artist never ceases to be subservient to nature, but instead of imitating the incidents in a paltry way, he imitates the laws."-Andre Lhote

    Web, FineArt, Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to jpacer For This Useful Post:


  • #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,435 Times in 747 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    kamikazel33t: I like the analogy you have there of it beinga quest or journey, and that there isn't one route or end, and that at different stages in the journey the point of said journey may change. That being said, I still feel a bit lost. I guess I am pulled in a few directions right now, and am not sure what my role or purpose should be. I haven't watched the video yet, but I will take a look at it later tonight.




    Dennis: You may be on the money here by saying I am overthinking and need to just draw. And I agree with your percentages for how my art is too... but I will disagree a bit with your suggestion that just because you cannot fully convey something to another, you should not care. Should one not strive to convey it anyways? A partially conveyed idea is better than an empty shell without substance.




    wardrum: I have been wondering about the whole experiences thing too... at the moment I am still quite young and haven't much lived life. And I'm not doing a lot about it currently either, I basically am either at work or am sitting at home wasting time and maybe drawing a bit. "Some artists communicate emotions naturally while most do not I think", I think this statement isn't necessarily true. It is the balance of intuition vs logical analysis. People begin art with intuition only, which without any training or direction is very crude, then they begin to
    study and learn and observe and take on a more logical approach...just then it is a matter of whether or not you keep that intuition with you. A lot of academic art loses sight of this I find, and maybe that's what I need here, to stop thinking so much and listen to that intuition in the back of my mind. Is intuition in art what this is all about? Is intuition seen as emotion?





    Benedikt: Yeah I guess it is important to remember that...still, I think that one can try to place meaning nonetheless, and even if it is misinterpreted or only partially received, it will be recognized.






    dpaint: Yes, this is what brought all this up in the first place though. If art is about communication, then what do I do if I have nothing TO communicate?? Like, I have no message to tell the world, no story, nothing. There is nothing I wish to say...so why speak? Or is this the kind of thing where I should just keep talking until I begin to find my own words and find what it is I was trying to say all along?







    Chris Bennett: Not to sound too rude or anything, but this type of statement comes across to me as the kind of thing that sounds profound but holds little actual meaning. Perhaps I just don't understand how to use this, but I don't get how this will help me with all of this. And what if I have nothing to say?






    Gibi: Ah, interesting thoughts, so in your mind the act of doing art is the ends rather than the means? It is not even the result that matters, but the act? I guess it does fulfill a need within me...I mean, without art I would have no point to live I guess. It is an obsession that has consumed me, so I should do it just to feed that obsession.






    jpacer: First off thanks for the compliment on my work. It does bring up another question (one that perhaps pertains very closely to this discussion) which is "what is an expressive line (or painting)?". In the latest pencils I posted the line is very uniform and I tried to keep it rather heavy handed, though I also tried to get it nice and confident and clean in one go. I have heard others talk of lines that vary a lot in weight and disappear to be very expressive. Others might call a scratchy loose line to be expressive. What makes it expressive? Is anything by default an expression simply by it being an intentional mark?

    I guess the next part of your post somewhat answers this--any artist cannot help but escape their own expression. Maybe it is difficult to see this in one's own work though, because I find my work to be generic, derivative and lacking in expression. Perhaps it is also something that develops a lot more with time and experience, and is soemthing I should nto even worry about too much.

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,322
    Thanks
    3,557
    Thanked 5,495 Times in 3,700 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    I don't think Chris was being trite. You did to live life a bit to find what you need to express. Spending all you time learning without ever giving yourself a chance to spread your wings can limit yourself. Does it matter if you fall on your face? You paint because you need to express yourself, and not those polite faces you show to everyone - dig deeper, go out and live bit more. Face your demons and angels.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Black Spot For This Useful Post:


  • #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    And what if I have nothing to say?
    Then you have a problem, but I wouldn't worry too much about that...the very fact you realize that and wrote such an OP, puts you on the right path.
    Just follow it...it won't lead you astray.

    Is anything by default an expression simply by it being an intentional mark?
    Yes, but...there are thresholds that separate these things, contrary to what Beuys might have thought.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Cola73 For This Useful Post:


  • #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 18 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    If art is about communication, then what do I do if I have nothing TO communicate?? Like, I have no message to tell the world, no story, nothing. There is nothing I wish to say...so why speak? Or is this the kind of thing where I should just keep talking until I begin to find my own words and find what it is I was trying to say all along?
    Most of commercial concept art/illustration is communicating what other people have to say. But there has to be some sort of passion, a piece of you in what you make or else it's just generic shit that gets lost in the pile.

    If anything, I think we could at least be actors trying to feel/convey what the characters in our images are feeling or what we would feel like in a particular scene. Maybe some of us don't have much to say but maybe we can say what others want to better?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to wardrum For This Useful Post:


  • #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    455
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 49 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't know your age and how you educate yourself.I had to find this out the hard way. There are always younger people then you who don't have the insight you have. Keep them in mind as your audience. not people who seen it all And if you look at the stories written by Charlie Kaufman Its not very healthy to be your own story while writing it etc. See the movies If you don't know what I mean.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Gibier For This Useful Post:


  • #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    1,490
    Thanks
    202
    Thanked 541 Times in 305 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    kamikazel33t: If art is about communication, then what do I do if I have nothing TO communicate?? Like, I have no message to tell the world, no story, nothing. There is nothing I wish to say...so why speak?
    I can't tell you anything that I absolutely know to be true about this, but in my personal experience I, too, hardly ever tell a story of my own. Contests, commissions, studies, doesn't matter, they're all essentially ideas and stories that come from someone else. Of course you infuse your own way of story-telling, your own style if you will, into the artwork. But it's not entirely your own.

    I, personally, don't really care as long as I get to paint and draw. However, if you feel that this is becoming more important to you, I'd suggest starting a personal project that let's you realize this aim. Think hard about something you can and/or want to tell/communicate. Start your own graphic novel. Paint a series of landscape images and/or maps depicting a world entirely of your creation. Create starships of a fictional fleet. Make up a planet with fauna and flora entirely of your creation. Anything that (more or less) originally comes from you. That way you might be able to regain the feeling of "having something to say".

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Benedikt For This Useful Post:


  • #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    israel
    Posts
    363
    Thanks
    88
    Thanked 131 Times in 121 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I will admit that I am slightly metaphysically and spiritually biased on this and this may be a bit pretentious but...
    in the question-why should I paint?
    who is the one asking the question?,if your "I" is just a concept inside your mind which is also just another thought
    how can you derive any essence or drive from a thought that pops up and then disappears.
    I guess what I am trying to say is that deriving meaning ,inspiration and drive from thoughts can only get you so far and
    at a certain point you have to track back and see what was the actual feeling(which is not conceptual) that got you excited about art(and life) in the first place.

    and sorry again for this grasshopper shit maybe it will help someone else because whatever you are doing seems to be working from looking at your art.

    Last edited by GrayPersona; June 8th, 2013 at 01:04 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to GrayPersona For This Useful Post:


  • #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    US
    Posts
    786
    Thanks
    97
    Thanked 153 Times in 137 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you're a commercial artist - It's financial.

    If you're a "non-commercial artist" - It's not financial.

    Yes I got very "pedantic" there. It's what I believe. The "Artist" part is expressing ideas, emotions, stories, w/e, and know about all the tools/techniques they can use to get to the end product.

    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
    George Bridgman
    Joseph Sheppard
    Andrew Loomis
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to hitnrun For This Useful Post:


  • #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    @Andrew Sonea,
    definitely read H.Hesse's "The Glass Bead Game", if you haven't already.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Cola73 For This Useful Post:


  • #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    108
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    There was a time when I was really concerned about this question. But I found that thinking too much spoils everything for me. Everything has already been said and it has probably been said more eloquently than I could ever do. So why even bother?
    Why paint? There is only one answer:

    "because I fucking want to"

    Maybe you are no longer satisfied with making a pretty picture. Maybe you want to say more than "this is a pretty flower or this is a cool robot." And that's fine. I'm sure you'll have plenty to say if you give this some time. There is much to say in illustration. There are no limits. The difference between fine arts and illustration are only in the way the artists are paid. You can say as much or as little as you want. There are a lot of "boring" fine art paintings and a lot of "meaningful" illustrations. Just say what you like.

    Some pictures do indeed have "something" like Andrew Wyeth's paintings, but there is no magic. He just did those paintings because he felt like it. He was also really really good, but it's not like he had some divine insight that you have to have to be able to make meaningful art. He just did and so should we all. We should just paint because we want to. And If we don't want to we should just go watch Breaking Bad or A Game of Thrones or something.....or we could do both. that works too.

    My sketchbook Please drop by. :-)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Lost My Marbles For This Useful Post:


  • #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    455
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 49 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Though I agree on the part of "because I fucking want to" that state of mind on thinking comes across a bit "gemakzuchtig" to me. People ask these questions because they want to know even if a headache is the result. I understand but can not agree!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Gibier For This Useful Post:


  • #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    108
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I guess it seems a bit gemakzuchtig, but it took me a long time to get to that answer. years of angst and soul searching and giving up art altogether. In the end it's the most simple answers that hold the most truth, if truth even is a thing. I didn't mean to be short. I understand the want for answers. This is the best answer I could give and I stand by it 100 percent.

    My sketchbook Please drop by. :-)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Lost My Marbles For This Useful Post:


  • #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    455
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 49 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You're right! I had depressions for like 10 years because of over complicating everything! And finally I just cured myself with reflecting on myself and the world. What I saw before as cliché and not worth mentioning I now see as more truthful then before. But I don't know if this answer is useful for someone who wants to know, that's all!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Gibier For This Useful Post:


  • #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    Chris Bennett: Not to sound too rude or anything, but this type of statement comes across to me as the kind of thing that sounds profound but holds little actual meaning. Perhaps I just don't understand how to use this, but I don't get how this will help me with all of this. And what if I have nothing to say?
    Why do you make an image with your hands?
    What exactly are you doing mentally when you place coloured mud onto a surface (or the simulacra of the process with digital technology)?
    Is your goal to be a camera made of meat? (Kev Ferrara's phrase)
    Or is it something more sublime, more to do with your human relationship to the world in which you are a sentient part?

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  • #24
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,180
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 2,356 Times in 1,211 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    Like, I have no message to tell the world, no story, nothing. There is nothing I wish to say...so why speak? Or is this the kind of thing where I should just keep talking until I begin to find my own words and find what it is I was trying to say all along?
    Really? You have no opinions? You view everything that comes your way in the world with passive indifference? I doubt it. And if you do then it's time to get out of your cave more often and let the world make you angry once in a while.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to vineris For This Useful Post:


  • #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,322
    Thanks
    3,557
    Thanked 5,495 Times in 3,700 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    You are so young still. Go out and meet more people who stretch your mind. Find out what makes you uncomfortable and figure out why. Go and find beauty in mundane things. Empathise more. Then see if it makes you want to paint.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Black Spot For This Useful Post:


  • #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,358
    Thanks
    242
    Thanked 356 Times in 276 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think like others have said, you're overthinking your own personal why. I cant comment on your work (still working through your sb) but from your words it does sound like you're getting stuck in a rut about whether to just be technical (do studies) or move on and be more personally expressive and adventurous.

    The thing is, that move forward is inevitable.

    What Chris and Blackspot and others said about expression of yourself in your art and life experience makes a lot of sense. Maybe it only seems complicated because you're in overthinking mode, but it's really very simple.

    You don't have to have a big statement to make to communicate through your art. It's simply an expression of your own self, your personality and your life experiences which inform, and translate into, your work. Thats not something you can avoid. It's like handwriting. Everyone has their own style of writing, regardless of how technically proficient they are at making words. In the same way, everyone has their own way of making a picture regardless of how technically proficient they are at composition or colour or drawing etc. Who you are and how you see the world and think and feel will show in your work whether you want it to or not. And the more you've seen and experienced, the more it will show.

    The technical methods you acquire along the way are simply a means to make it easier for you to express yourself more clearly.

    Anyway, that was a lot of rambling. Sorry if I repeated anything others already said or if I'm telling you stuff you already know. It's just what your op and the following discussion triggered in my mind.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Candra H For This Useful Post:


  • #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,435 Times in 747 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks everyone for all these great responses. Even though there are some slight different viewpoints being presented, the underlying essence of everyone seems to say that I A) Should live life more B) Stop overthinking and C) That it is in me all along, whether or not I see it (Wizard of Oz kinda thing)





    Black Spot: Ah okay. I guess my life experience IS really small...but how exactly do I "live life" so to speak? When I think of that I think of people travelling and stuff, but that isn't really an option for me. I guess at this point in my life I am more passing through it rather than experiencing it--my life consists of either working at a low skill job in a kitchen or sitting at home alone and maybe doing some art. I very rarely go out or see people, and I guess I have very few friends right now.




    Cola73: I don't know Beuys really or what he said. Anyways, I guess this is progress for me if I am questioning things.



    wardrum: Okay, but should I be satisfied just saying what others want to say?




    Gibi: Well I'm still young actually, I just turned 20, and am teaching myself art. Why do I want to have my audience the least aware? Wouldn't I want to project to those with more experience? And I'll have to check out Charlie Kaufman, never heard of him.




    Benedikt: That's a good idea. I think a project like that can give direction to oneself, like James Gurney and his Dinotopia.





    GrayPersona: Haha, some of that is going over my head a bit I think, sorry! As to what drew me to art initially, well it was I guess...hrm, yeah the visual aspect, the superficial. But now I am questioning if that is enough...




    hitnrun: Well I believe that even a commercial artist can have thigns to say, and shouldn;t lose sight of that. There are plenty of examples of illustrators turned fine artist: Jeff Watts, Phil Hale, Howard Terpning, Rick Berry, etc. and some do both simultaneously eg Pudd'nhead/Kevin Llewellyn



    Cola73: I'll check it out.


    Lost My Marbles/Gibi: I see...this goes back to a more superficial view of things then, like the initial "to make pretty pictures", it is now just "because I want to"... I'll have to see if that is enough for me though. I don't know. As Gibi said, sometimes it is good to question things and do a bit of thinking, maybe in the end I will come to the same answer, but perhaps I need to go through the stages of asking and the headaches





    Chris Bennett: Okay, now I see what your'e saying more. That Kev expression (actually I thought it was Elwell, but maybe I was mistaken) is something I think about quite often. I guess it is my fear of becoming a meat camera that has spawned this whole discussion.






    vineris: Hm, well, I guess I must have some opinions yeah, but...well for a lot of things I tend to try not to have an opinion. Things like politics or something that is of no interest to me I remove myself from and try to remain neutral since I am uninformed. And I never get angry haha! The real question is how to translate any of my opinions or reactions to the world into paint, and I don't just wanna do some hamfisted politically/socially charged image or something, that type of art turns me off faster than anything else.






    Black Spot (again): This goes back to my response to you earlier in this same post, but where do I meet these people? How do I do these things? I guess I just need to get out more, though I'm not sure what I'd do. I am a pretty asocial type of guy, pretty introverted mostly, and I'm not in school or anything where it is easy to meet people.





    Candra H: Thanks, I like the way you explain it. And no, that's not rambling, it was quite succinct I think.

    Last edited by Andrew Sonea; June 10th, 2013 at 05:59 PM.
    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • The Following User Says Thank You to Andrew Sonea For This Useful Post:


  • #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    455
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 49 Times in 42 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'll try and answer on your response but it's hard because its an insight that's to much based on my own person. But I see kids as a better judge then adults because they are still rooted somehow. And they won't judge your work like an adult who often has to deal with balancing between crudely stated envy and pity,status or whatever. Just a bit more themselves. So not least aware, but different awareness. But its from my perspective..Just find balance between wanting to know and enjoying life I guess..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    432
    Thanks
    225
    Thanked 123 Times in 119 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think you should buy a new sketchbook, rather large, not too many sheets, and spiral bound. Then paint your ass off! Write across whatever you paint, paint over whatever you write. Paste magazine cuttings. Just massacre the damn thing! It doesn't have to look pretty or right, it's for the purpose of "art therapy" for nobody else but you. In that way you learn more about what effects that speaks to you in terms of translating opinions and emotions. Like if you were to create with the mind set on the warm feelings of summer or deep agonizing frustration, you'll probably find that you prefer certain colors and effects to express that.

    Watch a movie. Study how they use lighting, perspective, and maybe even pacing/cuts (like calm, chaotic) to create a mood, which directs the emotion. See how it affects you in context to what you think they want you to think/feel.

    THEN you can start making it look good. Apply the anatomy you studied, use the correct composition and stuff like that. I lack in this step a lot, so I make nothing but crap really! But I see that you seem to have a pretty good idea of all the fundamental stuff, so I guess you just need to let yourself go and experiment

    http://wingedseed.com/blog/wp-conten...rth226x211.jpg This image is great! Depicting a rich man in a suit eating the world. That image expresses what could take hundreds of words to describe related to both opinion and emotion.


    Have you ever watched Chuck Connelly - The Art of Failure? I couldn't find it on youtube, but he's the stereotypical drunk artist painting from pure emotion and it destroys him. Or was. I think he might have pulled himself together. But too much emotion without brains doesn't seem like the way to go either.


    I don't know if any of this was the slightest bit helpful so feel free to ignore if not. But I hope you'll figure it out and stick with the art

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    2,018
    Thanks
    292
    Thanked 791 Times in 584 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey Andrew- I totally get what you're saying. For me the "why" question is basicly why I ended up at architecture school vs. OCAD or Sheridan or something. I'm not there to be a great architect, but to read all the bajillion classical (ie. often mind bending/historically significant) books they throw at me, and travel, do some stupid(fun) things, and learn a huge amount of assorted stuff and generally figure my life out, while doing art/design, all of which going to an art school/personally studying art likely wouldn't have. Personally, I have always loved illustration over all other types of artwork- the stories involved in essence I guess. I always wonder where the source comes from. Why would mine be important enough to spend huge amount of my life making sure other people see it. What I even want to tell them. I know I want to, but I also want to figure out why and what.

    Anyway, I agree with CandraH and Blackspot wholeheartedly. It's personal expression in the same way writing is, and everyone has something to say that's important, and I think the idea behind writing and art is the same. In my experience, successful writers can tell great stories, or be good writers. Amazing writers combine the two. ie. painting for technical precision and excellence is a valid route, and so it art for expression, etc.

    Good luck. I know this whole thought process can be exhausting and depressing but I also think it's very worthwhile and you likely need to do it once even if it's only subconsciously to keep yourself grounded.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

    Members who have read this thread: 4

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Art Workshop Discount Inside
    Log in
    Register

    Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
    The Art Department
    SpringOfSea's Sketchbook