How did Velazquez do this?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,881
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,434 Times in 746 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    How did Velazquez do this?

    I was going through my art folders and came across this painting...I was struck by the pattern/design on it since it is so precise. This sort of thing would be easy in Photoshop, but in oils I have no clue as to how you'd do this. It looks like he painted the drapery first without the pattern, then somehow laid out the pattern on top in one value, and added a few lighting details on top. But how did he do this? I don't imagine it was drawn freehand since it is so perfect and the pattern doesn't distort/change as it wraps around the forms. Is there some way of masking out the pattern? A way to transfer the pattern?

    Whole painting:
    Name:  Velazquez26small.jpg
Views: 642
Size:  365.3 KB

    Detail (haha, this is only like 60% zoom on the file, crazy hi-res, shame the forums won't let me post anything near that size):
    Name:  Velazquez26detail.jpg
Views: 554
Size:  389.2 KB

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Black Spot's Avatar
    Black Spot is online now Pew, Pew, Pew Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    9,705
    Thanks
    3,232
    Thanked 5,372 Times in 3,594 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    I think it would be freehand. I was blown away with the fabric on Hans Holbein's The Ambassadors. You can see almost every stitch.

    Name:  the_ambassadors_[detail _3]-large.jpg
Views: 393
Size:  170.5 KB


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    970
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 445 Times in 245 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Unpaid interns and whips.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    453
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 192 Times in 104 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Maidith View Post
    Unpaid interns and whips.
    Muahahaha!


    I'd guess it was made with some kind of a stamp.

    www.ClassicalAtelier@HOME.com
    My website for learning traditional fine art on your own! --- Derived from THIS thread at CA.org
    ------------ ♦ ♦ ♦ ------------
    www.cast-drawing.com
    drawing casts (geometric shapes, anatomical casts, skull), tutorials on Bargue drawing and cast drawing, Willow Charcoal, free drawing exercises
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Maidith View Post
    Unpaid interns and whips.
    Probably, since this is completely atypical for developed Velasquez...or better yet, an early work, since it's still stiff, also atypical for developed Velasquez.

    Last edited by Cola73; April 16th, 2013 at 05:44 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Near Philly, US
    Posts
    339
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 260 Times in 129 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    People are mesmerized by details (not related to horror vacui). Doing this freehand directly on the painting is not difficult, just time consuming. Every element in the pattern is slightly different in the painting. Having done quite a few traditionally painted tessellation designs (for software repeat), as long as you plan the repeat pattern and grid correctly it’s just a matter of dealing with the lengthy time it will take getting a large field done. This is a large painting, 314 cm x 301 cm, almost 10 feet high. This makes the main tessellation element about 11.5 cm (4.5 inches), a comfortable size to paint in oil or tempera. If you can paint the principle tessellation element you can paint it repeating a million times—if you have the time. Glazing can be used for shading the fabric folds over the pattern.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to bill618 For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mölndal, Sweden
    Posts
    2,773
    Thanks
    2,379
    Thanked 1,911 Times in 832 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah. Lots of time and hard working assistants I would assume. The way the pattern isn't affected by the folding of the fabric apart from lighting makes it seem like this was done using some sort of stencil or at least a grid.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

    Sketchy Link

    Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    3,855
    Thanks
    2,297
    Thanked 2,232 Times in 1,352 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Most likely he did that by delegating the tedious task to an assistant.

    In our time, when it is usually expected that the artist does all work on their own, people forget that for the most of history artists used help from pupils and assistants, especially successful artists who had many paintings commissioned.

    Multiple artists working on the same painting happened way more often than a lot of people realize. Things like underpainting, background, clothing, horses etc. would often be delegated to someone else, either because it was tedious or because that someone else was specifically skilled at the task. (And then there had been cases like fresco painting, which must be done while the wall is wet, so there was no other way than assaulting it with a crowd.)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    98
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 47 Times in 30 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I won't claim to know exactly how this was done, but I can however add some observations of my own.

    If you'll notice, the pattern doesn't hold true to the form at all. Instead it appears to be a flat, consistent grid.
    Even in the intricate folds you can see that the grid holds steady, although broken up in the recessed areas.

    It seems to me that if someone took the time to delicately lay all of that pattern out, they would account for the form shifts and the way the fabric should warp away from the viewer.
    My best guess is a grid/stencil of some sort (I say the word 'stencil' loosely, I can't picture them going Banksy style on it haha)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    175
    Thanks
    210
    Thanked 60 Times in 41 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    he did it by keeping in mind "if there's nothing you'd rather be doing than what you're currently doing, then nothing is work"... that and a lot of students as people have said.

    People are like Clay Vessels! Their usefulness depends on their EMPTINESS! You must Empty yourself of all your mental clatter, noise and bullshit, so that you can make truly spectacular art.
    Whatever you produce is only a mirror of your internal state.

    The reason antiquity produced such great artists, must be that they lived in a different way; devoted to a craft, not distracted by anything.

    Harsh as it sounds; You must not only be dedicated, you must be DEADiCated; we all will die, soon, and what, proudly, will we, will YOU be able to look back on and say: My work; This is what I did with MY life?

    who alive today has such devotion, and can distance themselves from the noise of the world? The techno-babble; the inane merry go round.

    Something to work on (:

    No pressure, cause, there's an infinity of things to work on, and whatever you choose will be your choice and you will know why you chose it.

    ...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •