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  1. #1
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    Trying something new

    Hello,

    usually I love to paint landscapes, nature and sceneries.
    Often with landscapes you have the problem that there isn't much story to be told.
    As soon as you put humans in the scene the painting tells a lot more story, I think, which makes it more interesting.

    For that reason I wanted to try and paint some humans and a scene where they are the main focus.
    Furthermore, I tried a new perspective. In most landscape drawings I use 1 point or 2 point perspective.
    Now I'm trying to have a scene with a top view.

    Ok, less talk, more painting, here's the block-out. I still suck like hell drawing humans. Any advice on anatomy will be appreciated.
    Besides that, are there some ideas for improving the composition?

    Thanks for all help!

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  3. #2
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    It looks like the guy on the cliff is falling in too. For an extreme angle shot like this I would definitely make sure that my perspective is right.

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  5. #3
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    The perspective is difficult. Something like this is easier to read:
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    Currently, it looks like the surface on top is almost at as much of a steep angle as the cliff walls.

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  7. #4
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    one problem is that you're choosing the wrong moment in the story to capture. It's far more interesting, and easier to clearly illustrate the point of the story right before she falls, when she's losing her grip of her friend. with that moment, your choice of perspective might be justifiable to shoe the depth shes falling into.

    -start a revolution.

    AnimationSamurai.com
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  9. #5
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    Funny, I've this idea in mind for a while but haven't started so far; Here are my thougt about it and how I planed to paint:
    1)If I were you I'd crop it much tighter to focus on the actual action. Keep in mind that a vertical composition is always more dynamic that an horizontal one especially for this subject. If you do prefer to keep a wide view of the scene, remember the rule of third of composition, here you subject is really on the edge of the picture which is not good.
    2)Work your one point perspective
    3)With this kind of perspective you should work the overlap of limbs to get the sense of depth, here you've got a big problem with that. Just an exemple: the yellow man left arm: with this perspective we should have a tinier hand, the extremity of the yellow sleeve should be rounded and not concave. His head you be bent toward the void which means that we should be able to see his neck and the base of the cap should be concave and not convex as you drew it. It's just 2 exemple but your picture is full of this issues which means you must learn more about basic drawing in perspective. If it's too difficult for your at the present time drawing skill, chose a simplier perspective like the one Aqualeot mentionned. Less dynamic but much, much easier to draw.
    To sum up: I'd say that you've gone too far in your painting without begining by a strong sketch of your image. Don't bother with colors and rendering until you've come up with the good basic drawing. It's a waste of time IMO. I know it's hard to hear but I think you should start from scratch until you get it right.

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  11. #6
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    Seems you ignored most of my suggestions from couple of your wip threads back. Don't lock yourself into computer screen and/or your "imagination". Observe and draw real world. A lot. The only way to learn to draw landscapes well is to draw real landscapes from observation. Same goes for the human figure. Draw real people from observation. Floating in the world of "visions" while confined inside the photoshop tends to lead to a dead end. Unfortunate thing is that it may take years of frustration to realize this.

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  13. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaCan View Post
    Seems you ignored most of my suggestions from couple of your wip threads back. Don't lock yourself into computer screen and/or your "imagination". Observe and draw real world. A lot. The only way to learn to draw landscapes well is to draw real landscapes from observation. Same goes for the human figure. Draw real people from observation. Floating in the world of "visions" while confined inside the photoshop tends to lead to a dead end. Unfortunate thing is that it may take years of frustration to realize this.
    I haven't been completely ignoring the suggestions I have a traditional media sketchbook for ballpoint pen, also I draw with pastelchalk from real life as well as digitally like in the following examples.

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    But yeah, you are right, I never dealt with the subject of anatomy and I started this painting just out of nothing. Probably I'm gonna leave this painting for now and go on with the real life drawing.
    It is just, that after painting a lot from reference or real life it is very tempting to do something out of imagination. I guess it will take a lot more time until having a good mental libary.

    Again, thanks for bringing me back to the right path!

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