Advice on Design Lifestyle
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  1. #1
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    Advice on Design Lifestyle

    Hey folks, new to the forums and finding them helpful. I thought I'd open up a topic with some of my concerns about my graphic design work.

    I am graduating from college next fall and am pretty concerned about my portfolio and making an income as a designer.

    My heart lies with all things visual and psychedelic. However, I am not really making any psychedelic pieces that are incredible by any means and because there's such intricate details and blending involved, I find myself messing around with different software but not really creating much for a portfolio. Just trying to build a library of brushes, renders, and tools to better understand software.

    Do you guys think I should stick to typography layouts, logos, letterheads and all the boring (to me) graphic design work, or try to find my place in the visual psychedelic design world?

    I'm really regretting my lack of drawing ability...

    I'm thinking of trying to work at a printing company for post graduation and summer job or internship because it isn't subjective like art and design. I don't really know much about advanced printers though. I have worked tech support for my university during my college years. I've had an internship too, but that was mostly working with WordPress themes and plugins.

    I really love design but I don't know if I have it in me to make a career out of it. I just don't really take much pride in most of my work and it's a bit embarrassing to show my portfolio because I feel like people are asking, is this it? This is all you've done with your college career?

    I just find myself slaving over my computer trying to get shit done, but not really having much to show for it. My friends who are in generic majors like business and science don't have to spend nearly as much time because it is a process and facts more than subjective art.

    Basically, I just don't see myself being successful in a corporate environment for graphic design, and I don't have good enough skills to turn my psychedelic designs into an income, especially since I can't draw and therefore can only be so original.

    I am quite lost. Any advice, stories, or discussions would be great.

    Thanks.

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  2. #2
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    I feel u bro. its not too late to learn drawing. i recommend "the new drawing on the right side of the brain" book. I am a graphic design student as well but im aiming for concept art. Drawing is essential to any artist, its a must! its one of the so called Foundation. i also recommend doodlealley.com.

    Final words#brotip. Just do what you love. Do what your interested in. Indulge in challenge. Be bold, Dont hold back and Love the process then you have no good reason to quit/leave. You might saw success artist doing theyre thing making it look easy and the fact is you just never saw them struggle. Struggle is part of the process i guess thats why they call it the artists journey.

    i guess thats all i can say. I just fcking cant quit art. my imagination just haunts me at night. o here's my portfolio in branding http://99designs.com/users/639417 thought im not confident with it

    Gud Luck and God Bless.

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  3. #3
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    its never too late to learn how to draw. i recommend the new draw on the right side of the brain.
    you also better check this site. doodlealley.com

    best tip for you. Just do what you love, Do what interest you, Be bold, Dont hold back, and love the process

    its just that you never saw great artist struggle in their own journey.

    you say you dont have it to make a career thats bull**** cuz u modafakah love design ryt! Well you need love to do what you love ryt? and you cant hate what you love. just push it through! dont stop creating. Dont stop creating LIFE. art/design has been a part of you so dont you quit.

    your desire vs frustration -chrisoatley.com
    follow your passion - stephen silver (you should check him out on youtube)

    and yeah thats it.

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    Hi there,

    Most of the people on this site are concept artists rather than graphic designers, but from your post you are describing a phenomenon common to artists and creative people of all kinds everywhere. I can speak with authority on this subject because I spent many years doing it myself. If you find yourself going around in circles and working on things for long periods of time without having much to show for it, especially if you know you're capable of much more than that, there's something which is stopping you from just sitting down and getting on with your work. Buying/watching/creating/organising materials, tutorials and software is all very well but it's useless if you don't actually use it to create professional or portfolio pieces, and if you're doing those things to the exclusion of actually being productive I'm afraid it's called "procrastinating!" There's usually emotional/psychological reasons behind this and it is a very powerful step to take charge of that, acknowledge it for what it is and take steps to change it. Sometimes these reasons are fear of success or failure, fear of putting your personal work or career choice out there to be judged, frustration or intimidation from comparing yourself to top professionals, or any number of other things. It sounds like you're worried about entering a professional environment, but you can work on a freelance basis or get your feet wet by doing some small freelance projects.

    The truth is that, especially if you already have good skill, the only thing between you and a successful career in what you want to do is yourself!

    Oh, and the most important thing: buy this book and do it now. It will help.

    Hope this helps, I've been there.

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    Thanks for the replies, it is nice to talk this out with strangers haha.

    I really like how you said that macartist, I should not quit and there is always time to learn to draw. I'm almost 22, so I guess I shouldn't be fretting so much. It's just the idea of getting a job and leaving college is part of the stress circle. I also gained some weight during my college years (I partied a lot), so I think it's all tied together.

    I've been feeling blue about it most of the day, but I need to bring back my fuck it attitude because life could be much worse. I must keep telling myself that, and get in shape, and keep the creative and psychedelic juices flowing.

    Birkeley, your post made me realize that the doubt in my creative skills is not the only issue on the table--i believe the emotional factor for me is getting in shape and not stressing about time so much. Like I said, i'm almost 22, so I guess I'm really not in a terrible position so long as I start getting my shit together now.

    I just get stressed about time because things like drawing take a lonngggg time and I need results sooner rather than later.

    Anyways, thanks again.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by macartist View Post
    i recommend "the new drawing on the right side of the brain" book.
    I recommend to disregard that advice. The book does contain a pep talk on how anyone can learn to draw (true, it only requires dedication and systematic practice), and a few useful ice-breaker exercises (e.g. copy a drawing upside down - teaches you to not focus on symbols like "this is an eye" but on real forms, or drawing the negative space around the object - same thing). What it does not contain is a viable learning program or drawing method. It is full of pseudoscientific babble and contrived lessons that are meant to persuade you that you've made huge progress in a few days, then it leaves you in the dark.

    Get some other drawing manual. Nikolaides, or Loomis.

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