Art: A career question...
 
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  1. #1
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    A career question...

    Hi!

    I was just wondering, if one were looking to pursue a career as a concept artist at a studio, would it be beneficial to learn how to animate? Is it required or is it just something like a bonus? Do concept artists ever animate their designs?

    Thank you so much!

    p.s.: I hope I put this in the right forum, if I didn't- I'm sorry, I'm new!

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  3. #2
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    I'm not an animator, but the way it usually works is the concept artist creates concepts for the animators - who may or may not also be the 3d sculptors or what have you.

    So it's not necessary per se but it is taught in college courses. Animation was a required credit at my college for any sort of entertainment design degree, and I will tell you I didn't like it one bit, but it was useful. It's also helpful to know how animation works so you make designs that work.

    ---- -
    sehertu mannu narāṭu ina pānāt šagapīru ningishzidda
    abrahadabra
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  4. #3
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    Lots of concept artists in the industry have at least a working knowledge of industry sculpting tools (Zbrush, Maya), and good fundamentals of animation (mainly understanding how to make a character that CAN deform well and be easily animateable.) At smaller studios, some concept artists also work on modeling/animating... but they are more 3d generalists to begin with. Concept art is a very difficult field, AND another thing to remember, esp. at big game studios is that Environment concept artists (designing bushes/buildings etc.) are more in demand than character concept artists.

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  5. #4
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    The more stuff you know- the more jobs you can apply for or the more positions a studio can utilize from you.

    As a generalist (2D television) - I tend to find jobs more quickly than my friends who are only-animators or only-layout etc... simply because I can apply to many more ads.
    Also, as Praemium said, design is super competitive, if you can fall back on animation or something else to fill in the employment gaps --- unless you're one of those gifted super-robot artists...

    Learn as much as you can cram into your brain - it's all useful

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