Explain Yourself!
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Talking Explain Yourself!

    Just wondering about any self taught pro artists or anyone aiming to become professional,how they explained to their friends and family what exactly they were doing. Easier if other work was involved but,

    Did anybody just up and quit and go full steam ahead?

    Did people wonder why you had no job and sat at desk all day?

    Did you bring in money during this time?

    Or are the only people that could have that type dedication,do it straight after school, may not have had family pressure or decided to stay single during this time?.

    Sorry I don't have any examples of my work,
    I'll try to get some up when I feel ready and more confident,
    I hope you can appreciate my honesty and be a little patient with my lack of contribution.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 228 Times in 148 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I always wanted to be a professional artist. I wasn't worried so much about what friends
    and family thought, but rather what to do to learn. For a long time I just went on instinct
    and my drive to draw muscles. This of course has a limit. At some point I had to say "thank
    humanity for the internet". It may seem stupid but, where I live, not only is there no institute
    that had anything to do with professional art, but even the classical art institutes were and
    still are very much geared towards what they call "high art", they don't teach fundamentals.
    So I was in the dark, yet I kept looking, sketching and at one point I struck gold.

    My family felt I should have become a scientist or something, mistaking my casual love for
    the sciences with a passion one has to do it professionally but I had no pressure. Now they're
    happy I did what I wanted. Girlfriends who wanted me to marry them (ugh...) were very critical,
    trying to change me into a more "secure" version akin to their daddies. Friends love the idea
    and are always trying to get something for free (and they don't).

    All I can say is that my one-track brain just likes the idea of muscled dudes, monsters and
    voluptuous women, as well as the enchantment of a blob of this and a blob of that looking
    like reality (or something else) a lot more than adhering to anyone's sense of security life-
    style or whatever.

    So, I'm better this year than the previous, when I was better than the last etc. Meanwhile,
    I try to exercise my intellect by pursuing other passions too (yea science also) and I'm enjoying
    the ride of learning more about art, while striving to be a pro.

    "Don't judge a book by it's cover" Frank Frazetta 1928-2010
    RIP Frank.

    DA gallery http://michaelsyrigos.deviantart.com/gallery/

    CA Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=131601
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Line For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    144
    Thanks
    200
    Thanked 50 Times in 30 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It's been something I've always wanted to do, my slowness I attribute (hopefully accurately) to many of the unreal things that have happened in my life, somewhat used to lagging behind my peers (not liking it, but used to it). Without going into to deep of details: PTSD is a hell of a thing. Parents don't approve, but they're hardly relevant all things considered. Life is hard, and to that end you get used to it, and my background isn't uncommon. I can honestly say that I'm thankful that this place exists, as the community is dedicated, the resources are plenty, and the admission is affordable (free).

    The rules of thumb seems to be just to 'hang in there' and 'challenge yourself', like in body building. But to answer questions specifically...

    Did anybody just up and quit and go full steam ahead?
    The few times I find myself able to sit down and spend weeks studying tend to be when I make the largest leaps in improvement. It helps to pace yourself but you should always make progress (not strive or attempt to, MAKE progress).

    Did people wonder why you had no job and sat at desk all day?
    All the time, though it helps to get up and out of the house so you can draw from life. All the same, people tend to make fun of what they don't understand.

    Did you bring in money during this time?
    From odd jobs alone. That comes with the territory, though.

    Or are the only people that could have that type dedication,do it straight after school, may not have had family pressure or decided to stay single during this time?
    You'll find that artists come from all kinds of backgrounds with different quirks about them (whether or not they're single, as well). There are many people who go through all kinds of morbid crap earlier in their lives that they get over for better horizons, and for many one of those horizons is become a professional artist.

    Last edited by ArtsySiridean; January 27th, 2013 at 09:36 PM. Reason: spellering
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ArtsySiridean For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    555
    Thanks
    312
    Thanked 379 Times in 118 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    First off. I'm not a pro yet, but I hope to become one, one day. I have managed to land one freelance job though.
    When people ask I just say: "I draw stuff as a hobby, in my free time, and some day I hope people will pay for it. You know, as an extra income. Maybe one day even full time."
    Other than people saying it's incredibly stupid, they all seem to understand so I don't really need to explain it further.

    I didn't have to quit my job though. I lost it, but if it wasn't for that I still wouldn't quit my job.

    I didn't get to attend art school, there is not pressure to actually succeed in this dream of mine from anyone else, and the time with my ex did leave me with less drawing time. Life also holds a lot of drama. All that are just speed bumps. Doesn't mean you'll never reach it unless you stop trying.
    Also doesn't mean you have to be some kind of art making machine hermit that 's only reason to live is your art. Its important to take breaks every now and then and do things that are more fun than paying bills and taking out the trash.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Lady Medusa For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,826
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 1,042 Times in 680 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I explain what I do to no one.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to OmenSpirits For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by OmenSpirits View Post
    I explain what I do to no one.
    lol, Thanks all who have posted, It actually also meant a lot that you put in a real effort to tell your story and not just answer the question, you actually got what I was asking ...Thank You!.

    Sorry I don't have any examples of my work,
    I'll try to get some up when I feel ready and more confident,
    I hope you can appreciate my honesty and be a little patient with my lack of contribution.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just thought Id add I read this on Feng Zhu's blog he replied to somebody about self taught concept artist -->
    Learning on your own is possible (there are some good examples out there). However, it requires a serious effort. Doing a few hours a day really isn't gonna cut it. If you really want to make a career switch, you need to put yourself in a stressful situation first. By having a job, you have a backup...therefore the pressure is not there. For me, I dropped out of a very good university to pursue a career in design - so it left me with a "all or nothing" mentality going in. People achieve great things when under pressure (I've seen this over and over with students).

    So if you can, perhaps work only part time (3-4 hour job per day...or not work at all), just enough to pay bills (or sell a car or something and use that money to fund your living costs). Then work around the clock to learn and practice. It sounds bold, but this is the pressure that's required. Careers are not handed to anyone; it's earned through hard work.

    Of course this is a huge risk, but that's the chance we all took when deciding to go down this career path.
    Its partly the reason I made the thread, but wanted to know what family reactions were, and how it was explained etc.

    Sorry I don't have any examples of my work,
    I'll try to get some up when I feel ready and more confident,
    I hope you can appreciate my honesty and be a little patient with my lack of contribution.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Xopher For This Useful Post:


  13. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    133
    Thanks
    115
    Thanked 48 Times in 39 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Basically, if your situation is comfortable it is a little harder to get yourself to push constantly to improve. You have to be uncomfortable to improve really. You shouldn't be comfortable with your artistic skill level for a very long time, or even never. That doesn't mean you shouldn't enjoy drawing or be accepting of where you are. If you do wind up leaving all your jobs and stuff, you should make a schedule for yourself for art studying and making. It's easy to spend too much time doing things that isn't art. So maybe something like 8:00 AM- 5M with a 10 minute break every hour to do art. And even then don't make the mistake to overload yourself with many concepts you're trying to learn. Surface learning doesn't cut it, use the time to go deep into the concepts and really understand the concepts, you'll improve/learn faster this way. The pressure's really on you to improve if your situation is bad, so you need to work efficiently.

    SLAM OR BE JAMMED
    Sketchbook
    My Rival!!
    Tumblr artblog I'm part of

    Draw, Antonio; draw, Antonio; draw and donít waste time.Ē -Michelangelo
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ryan Provenzano For This Useful Post:


  15. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Intersting Talk, just Audio Dave Rapoza and Dan Warren

    Published on Jan 25, 2013
    No painting this time- just a talk. Dave Rapoza and myself talk about what it takes to get through the middle of becomeing a success in freelance art. enjoy two perspective from one person who has made it, and another whos in the middle of trying. apologies for the nightmares.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iz65...ature=youtu.be

    Sorry I don't have any examples of my work,
    I'll try to get some up when I feel ready and more confident,
    I hope you can appreciate my honesty and be a little patient with my lack of contribution.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    300
    Thanks
    394
    Thanked 118 Times in 57 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I quit my very well paying 9-5 web design job and went 100% freelance illustrator. I just woke up one day and decided I didn't like my life and wanted to get back into the stuff I loved to do, which was illustrating. It's been almost a year and one wild ride but no regrets. I learned I work best under pressure and 9-5s make me a demotivated zombie. I did make almost 50% less for the year than I did in the 9-5, but I have much more freedom and I'm proud of the work I make. I might not drive an expensive car anymore but I wake up every day and enjoy my life. I notice myself improving and looking forward to doing whatever I want like attending Illuxcon this year and participating in contests... wouldn't trade that for the best of cars.

    It's all about your individual personality. Like I said in another thread: 9-5 is a relaxing boat ride and freelancing is a roller coaster, you gotta pick which one best suits you.

    As for what other people say and think. It doesn't really bother me because all I care about is being as good as the artists I've looked up to all my life. When you are into something this much, you sacrifice a lot of things most people won't. They will never understand. It reminds me of this episode of House. If you haven't seen it, House is a doctor obsessed with his work and to everyone else he seems miserable but he loves what he does and that's all that matters. This one episode a really talented blues artist who's also obsessed with what he does says this:

    "..I know the empty ring finger. And that obsessive nature of yours, that's a big secret. You don't risk jail and your career to save somebody doesn't want to be saved unless you got something, anything... one thing. The reason normal people got wives and kids and hobbies, whatever, that's because they ain't got that one thing that, that hits them that hard and that true. I got music. You got this. The thing you think about all the time. Thing that keeps you south of normal. Yeah, makes us great. Makes us the best. All we miss out on is everything else. No woman waiting at home after work with a drink and a kiss; that ain't gonna happen for us."

    By the way I love that Feng Zhu quote you posted. That guy is brilliant and he's easily in my top favorite artists of all time. I learned SO much just from watching his free videos online.

    Last edited by Harkins; January 28th, 2013 at 11:39 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Harkins For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •