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  1. #1
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    Freelance

    Hey guys my parents dont understand what it is to be a freelance artist I am trying to explain it to them is there any type of articles or something I could show them so they can read it over me them? I try to explain to them but my dad insists that I need some sort of classes to make it look better on an applications (which it doesn't) but he wont listen to it, and they insist I have a back up and money in my pocket always. I am 22 years old working a 40+ hour a week job, and I have recently decided I want to quit my job so I can work on my art, and spend the time I NEED to on my work. They keep telling me I need to have some sort of part time job and they think I will regret my decission but I feel this is the leap I need to take I have the itch of needing to become a freelance artist I have a LONG road still to go but this is what I feel is right. I am just unsure how to explain to my parents because it is a hard decision and they will be the ones I live under their roof for awhile. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

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    Hm. Can you make a deal with them to give you X amount of time to try it out?

    I hated freelancing. I imagine when you finally get established, with a stable clientele, it might become bearable. Even awesome. But I spent three years at it, and it was like one long, rude job interview after another. Humping my portfolio around, dealing with people who wouldn't say nice things about my work lest I ask for more money. Being asked to work for free "for your portfolio" or "for the experience." Dealing with the clueless and the tactless. I also discovered something about myself: when I was good enough, I wasn't fast enough and when I was fast enough, I wasn't good enough.

    Don't set yourself up in such a way that, if you don't like it, it's a huge problem for you to try something else.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    why do you live with your parents, when youre 22 and have a 40hr/week job?

    your dad is telling you you should have some financial backup? hes f-ing right! even more so if youre going to be a freelancer.

    infact you obviously know nothing about it. otherwise youd be able to justify it yourself and not having to ask us for possible excuses/justifications.

    the only possible solution for me has been ... if i dont owe them money... i dont owe them explinations. do your own thing, by sustaining yourself.

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    You should prepare for 1-3 years of hard work before you see any significant income. And by hard work, I'm talking a minimum of 6-8 hours of art study and practice a day (on average). If you enjoy the work and have a driving passion to improve your skill, then it won't be as bad as it sounds. At least, that's been my experience.

    Really the only way to convince your parents is to show them positive results. Until that is possible, a part-time job may not be a bad idea.

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    If you're going to do this and not work, you'd better have some serious savings in the bank so you aren't a giant leech on your parents. Otherwise, get a part-time job. Not only do busy people get more done, but your parents will interrupt you less. Also sitting alone at home thinking about nothing but art and interacting with unhappy parents is really shitty for creativity. If you can, get a part-time job in a creative workplace. If you can't, you'll still probably be better off spending at least some time outside the house.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

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    In all honesty, it doesn't sound like you're ready to go freelance. If you're having to work on your art to get it to the right level, then freelance just won't support you.
    40+ hours work still gives you the weekends and evenings to do art - it depends on how much you're willing to give up to accomplish your dreams. (like a lot of social life)

    If you give up your job now you're going to go from a fixed wage to zero income, with maybe dribs and drabs coming in. If you really, really want to go freelance you're going to need a nest egg of cash (3 months of bills worth) - try switching your hours to part time if you must, your parents have the right idea.

    Post up some of your art or provide a link to it - I'll give you my honest opinion on it.

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  12. #7
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    Unless you have a lot of money saved up, good connections, and a kick-ass portfolio, diving straight into freelancing is not a great idea... If you're starting from scratch, it's going to take a few years to become financially stable. If your portfolio isn't even ready yet, add several more years. If you're living with your parents that whole time, things are likely to get a bit tense around the house.

    You could invest in classes or even go to an art school - that way you can get out of the house, start building up connections, and work on your portfolio all at the same time. Or you could try to get part-time work in fields related to what you want to do - that's a good way to segue into freelancing, because you're gaining potential connections and potentially useful experience, and getting paid into the bargain. Plus a part-time situation leaves time for working on your portfolio and marketing/networking.

    Regardless of what you do, save up a decent chunk of money before you start freelancing - you're going to need it! I'd say save enough to get you through at least a year without starving.

    And don't forget freelancing will require you to spend a lot of money, too! As one of my teachers used to say, "you're going to hemorrhage money." Be prepared for that. It might help to get yourself set up in advance, and buy a ton of supplies and prepare a ton of marketing materials while you still have income from a full-time job... And set aside money for future expenses, because there will be plenty of expenses.

    EDIT: Just glanced through your sketchbook, and I must say in all honesty that I don't think you're ready yet. At your present stage, classes might be a really good idea, both for improvement and networking opportunities. Or see if you can get a part-time job, or keep your current job but scale back your work hours - and spend the rest of the time practicing.

    A couple of tips for practicing, it might do you good to do a lot more from life and less on the computer. And incidentally going out to draw and paint from life will get you out of the house, so you can practice without having your parents breathing down your neck...

    Last edited by QueenGwenevere; January 27th, 2013 at 02:02 AM.
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  14. #8
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    i can only speak for myself on this but i really like freelance; i quit a studio job and just started, without a clue really.
    id say the people saying expect 3 years of being broke are correct, so part time work is a very good idea. but once you get used to not having an Audi or going on holiday and eating rather a lot of beans, its fine. some people need stability, personally i like not knowing whatll happen, but then i dont have kids... anyway, once you get a few things people need that you can do in your skillset (ive found reliable money in property marketing and concept art for video games, but any materials that people need; wedding invites, designing brochures, painting portraits, whatever, will do).. then its down to you how hard you work.. sometimes i make lots of money in one month but i have to hang on to it as the next month might be a bit fallow. also, if you work hard, people come back over and over. its good to have fun work and boring work, mix it all up why not. you dont need to be leonardo da vinci to design brochures, you just need a brain, some practice, indesign, illustrator, google and skype. gone are the days of humping portfolios around, a laptop with a net connection will do. clients come in all flavours, but they usually start shit, because youre shit, and get better as you get better. push through 2 years of stress, being broke, doubt, worry, etc and youll be fine.
    on the plus side, so long as your work gets done and the client signs off, you can sleep when you like, watch porn, eat, drink beer, smoke weed, play loud music, watch movies, sit in the park, go to cafes, work from anywhere in the world and generally do stuff the stupid fuckers that work in office buildings really really hate.
    good luck!

    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; January 28th, 2013 at 06:45 AM.
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  16. #9
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    further, check out this thread in AD

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthr...plain-Yourself!

    lots of peoples stories and a lot of truthiness in there i think.

    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; January 28th, 2013 at 07:01 AM.
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    You're 22, live at home and probably have no expenses. This is the time to freelance if ever. I'm 26 myself, so I'm not a lot older than you, but I have school loans, a car payment, rent, etc and I freelance. What I can tell you is that you want to be adept at the skills you need for freelancing before you have all of those debts on your shoulders. Start working on networking and dealing with small clients now, so when it's time to be on your own, you are comfortable with what needs to be done.

    9-5s are like a relaxing boat ride and freelancing is more of a roller coaster. It's about what is better for your personality.

    Last edited by Harkins; January 28th, 2013 at 11:33 PM.
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