Anyone have any tips for drawing interiors of buildings?
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    Anyone have any tips for drawing interiors of buildings?

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    Economy of line is the most important in drawing highly artificial materials to convey a sense of stability and structure. E.g. draw an arch using one stroke instead of a flurry of strokes. The strokes may be wobbly at first, but wobbly strokes convey architecture better than hairy and messy strokes. This is primarily because highly artificial material have a lot of hard edges, while hairy edges are soft.

    Try practicing this by doing contour drawing without lifting your pencil too often. Drawing intricate building interiors require a lot of patience because of the overwhelming amount of detail. However, the most important thing is to establish the perspective of the entire scene first, then draw the bigger geometric shapes of the objects in the scene, then you detail it. Make sure to keep the strokes light so you can draw over it again if the light strokes are off.

    From photographs, details may be fuzzy at best, and that is when you need draw an impression of what is there. This is for when you want to convey a sense of texture of whatever detail that is not clear enough in the pixelated photograph, or when you want to convey detail so small on your paper that you can't possibly draw every bit of its details. An impressionistic drawing is one which looks like a bunch of marks close up, but represents something else farther away. To do so, you need to understand what is happening in the texture; when painting an impression of the weaves of a basket, you want to know how the basket is weaved in order convey the textures of the basket. Impressionism is about generalizing, a basket close up may require less generalizing than a basket far away. If the basket is far away, you most likely don't need to draw its textures. A field of yellow flowers may have hints of details with stems and leaves closer up, but farther away, it will look more like a field of just yellow(since father away, the stems become less visible).

    Chances are, you might not understand entirely what is going on in a photo, so you would have to guess or generalize. To generalize, you need to understand its properties. If you are drawing from a photo of an interior of a church and there is a mounted sculpture which displays about fifty figures which you can't possibly discern apart one from another. In this case you need to understand the properties of the sculpture, and in our case the intricate sculpture may be made of gold or brass. With the knowledge of how light affects specular objects such as gold, find the areas of the sculpture that presents enough detail so as to be able to draw it, then generalize the rest which you cannot describe with the knowledge of the latter.

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    Perspective Made Easy, Ernest R. Norling. This book makes you have solid understanding about perspective. You need a compass, long and short straight, pencil and lots of papers.

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