Art: Marcus Brutus Bargue Copy
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  1. #1
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    Marcus Brutus Bargue Copy

    Here is my Marcus Brutus (Plate I, 50) Bargue copy.
    I took my time with this one...It was fun.
    I color photo copied the plate from the Bargue book and scaled it up about 200% to copy it.
    The final is Charcoal 11X17.

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    Last edited by 5Form; January 19th, 2013 at 01:39 AM.
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  2. #2
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    I would say - well done.

    There are some issues which you propably already have seen but yeah it works.
    I'm a bit confused about the dark area on the throat.

    What was your procedure?

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  3. #3
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    Thanks! I think the shadows on the neck are from reflections since the piece is now behind glass.

    Here's my process...
    1. I usually start with drawing a center vertical and horizontal line to help with measurements. I start by roughing out the form with straight lines on a lower quality paper in graphite. Straight lines like some of the first plates in the Bargue exercises. I like to use a low quality paper to make all my mistakes and make sure to get the measurements right.

    2. Second I'll start to smooth out the hard lines and put more detail defining as much line work as I can. Sometimes I'll block out shadows with graphite on the drawing to help me get a feel for shadow shapes. At this point keeping everything pretty light. Filling in some shadow might cause me to see something I missed and I can correct the line work.

    3. Next, I trace the graphite sketch with tracing paper. Now I'm ready for the final piece bring out the higher quality paper. I transfer all the line work from the trace to the high quality paper using graphite transfer paper and a red ball point pen. I use a colored pen so I'll know what I've gone over. Be carful with the transfer paper cause it can get graphite everywhere.

    4. With a clean outline I can now start with charcoal. I usually start pretty light at first and lay in the charcoal a little at time. First block in mid tones then come in darker. I've tried vine charcoal but don't really care for it. Its too messy. I like to use general's charcoal pencils (form 2H ext hard to 6B ext soft), lots of blenders and kneaded erasers.

    Thats it. Have fun.

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  4. #4
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    Thanks!
    I think the shadows in the neck are from reflection since the piece is now behind glass.

    Here's my process...
    1. I usually start on a lower quality paper with graphite and draw a center vertical and horizontal line to help with measurements. I block in the from using straight lines like some of the first plates in the Bargue exercises and measure using the sight size method as much as I can.
    2. Then I smooth out the lines and fill in details. I block shade the mid-tones in graphite because sometimes this helps to find some mistakes so I correct as needed.
    3. Then I'll trace the line work with tracing paper.
    4. Next, I transfer the line work onto a high quality paper using graphite transfer paper and colored ball point pen. I like to use red so I can see what I've gone over.
    5. Now I start in with the charcoal. I always start light and try to block shadows the same way I did it in graphite, layering in the darks a little at a time. I've tried vine charcoal but don't really care for it. It's too messy. I realize it can give some pretty rich blacks, but I like to use General's pencils from 2H to 6B. Lots of blenders and kneaded erasers.

    That's it, Have fun.

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