Art: I am a aspiring comic book artist and writer any feedback will be much appreciated..
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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Your dialogue has spelling errors. Your word bubbles are irregular. The text is too big and not always evenly spaced. Carelessness is not professional and people notice more than you think they do. Often the difference between a pro and an amateur is attention to detail. The amateur lets things slide because s/he is impatient to finish, and it takes them longer to do things. The pro tries to take the time to fix things because bad work doesn't get them jobs.

    Go to balloontales.com to learn more about digital lettering and making word balloons. Lose the Comic Sans, it's universally associated with clueless newbie comics because it's usually the first thing that an aspiring comic artist sees on their pre-installed font list.

    You'll want to keep working on inking and colouring. The quality of your lines is still on the low side, you still obviously have some issues controlling your tools. If I were you I'd switch to a nib pen or brush, it's unforgiving and will force you into better inking habits. The blobby airbrush -- avoid it for colouring for now. It's also one of the first things newbies go for, and while eventually you might be able to make it work for you, for now you'll be better off not making everything soft and mushy. Learn a few other colouring techniques.

    Tangents -- places where one object or line just touches another object or line. Avoid them, because they draw attention to that spot and it's usually not a spot you want people to be looking at. Places like where the word balloons just touch a panel edge, or a limb just aligns with a panel edge or a word balloon aligns with a bull horn -- these places draw attention and guess what, the action doesn't happen at the edge of the panel or around the edge of a word balloon. You don't want people looking there. Move the word balloon so that it's either well away from the edge, or so that it overlaps the edge by a good amount. This goes for anything else that just touches, too.

    Watch postures. The king looks like he's falling forward in the fourth panel.

    You're not doing too badly with the dynamic panels. People usually mess them up something fierce, but your use of them is actually pretty good. Don't overuse them, though, you want people to pay attention to your story, and not to how fancy your panels are. They're usually great for action and not so hot for ordinary dialogue or activities.

    So it looks like you have pretty much all the standard beginner problems, but it's nothing that practice and study isn't going to solve. Keep working, read a lot of comics so you can tell what mistakes people make and avoid them, don't be careless and watch for those tangents.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
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  4. #3
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    thank you for your opinion .. it was very helpfull ... i will work on the areas you have pointed out .

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    I'm no expert, but...aside from what has already been mentioned, the one thing that is bothering me is the panel where the lion is kicking the gorilla toward the car. I can't put my finger on what's wrong though...it just looks...off somehow. I don't know.

    That, and I think they should have tails, but that's just personal preference.

    That said, your story intrigues me. I'd like to hear more. (but then, I'm drawn to resistance-stories for some reason)

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    Quote Originally Posted by VioletWhirlwind View Post
    I'm no expert, but...aside from what has already been mentioned, the one thing that is bothering me is the panel where the lion is kicking the gorilla toward the car. I can't put my finger on what's wrong though...it just looks...off somehow. I don't know.
    It's because it can't happen that way, space and energy where not being taken in account. Plus muscle poses cannot be in that position and generate the right amount of energy needed for that action and there's not enough space between the car and the gorilla guy because the perspective is wrong. I used to draw comics a few years ago and ALL my major effort was for the action and all of this stuff so i've studied a lot, the best thing you can do when you are drawing this type of scene is to do yourself the action and feel the position. And obviously taking a photo today it's the easiest and fastest thing you can do with your phone...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitsu//San View Post
    It's because it can't happen that way, space and energy where not being taken in account. Plus muscle poses cannot be in that position and generate the right amount of energy needed for that action and there's not enough space between the car and the gorilla guy because the perspective is wrong. I used to draw comics a few years ago and ALL my major effort was for the action and all of this stuff so i've studied a lot, the best thing you can do when you are drawing this type of scene is to do yourself the action and feel the position. And obviously taking a photo today it's the easiest and fastest thing you can do with your phone...
    Also Kaustubha, I suggest you study the book, "How to Draw the Marvel Way". Also, google "Little Nemo", by Windsor McCay, because your floating images have a sort of McCay feeling to them.

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