Art: Help! Need books on painting creature model kits!
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Thread: Help! Need books on painting creature model kits!

  1. #1
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    Help! Need books on painting creature model kits!

    Hello

    I would love to learn how to paint model kits. Specifically, creature model kits. I dont really know what tools to use or even what paint to buy. I know there are some really cool techniques that will make a model really pop out.
    like applying gloss to the eyes and other cool effects. I really hope someone can point me to a good book on creature painting. I dont mind if the book is in Japanese.

    Heres some examples of the type of painting style I would like to learn.

    p.s. I have orderd some fine scale modeler magazines and also orderd a highly rated book on diorama painting. I am really looking to find some books on creature or character painting tho

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  2. #2
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    There's a few videos at the Stan Winston School site that you might find useful and they're having a sale until the end of the month
    monster maquette assembly and paint
    the art of painting characters
    sculpey painting techniques

    Also check out the Painter's Pit Stop at Statue Forum.

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  3. #3
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    There's a few videos at the Stan Winston School site that you might find useful and they're having a sale until the end of the month
    monster maquette assembly and paint
    the art of painting characters
    sculpey painting techniques

    Also check out the Painter's Pit Stop at Statue Forum.

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  4. #4
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    Reaper makes great acrylic paint and I use that for most of my figure painting. Also an airbrush is important if you are looking to really get the quality from the pictures you showed. Think about getting some books on regular acrylic and oil painting because to be honest the technique for painting figures is the same.

    Here is a very basic order for painting:

    assemble kit, clean parts and put epoxy resin or some other filler substance in all seam lines and sand or file until invisible
    Prime assembled kit
    Apply a base color, usually darker than the main tone of each piece. (usually start with clothing, then skin, then accessories)
    Apply darkest tone into crevices for shadow (all colors at this stage and every step following must be thinned as you will add them all in layers)
    Apply mid tone wash over section
    Apply mid tone color on all main surfaces, making sure to not get this layer on your shadows
    Apply highlights onto all major raised surfaces or anything that would be most directly in sunlight. (the idea is to create artificial light so the figure looks good under any conditions)

    Apply these steps over and over again with thinned paint to achieve the look you want. Sometimes it helps to do multiple steps in quick order so you can blend the tones together. I usually have 10-20 layers on each section when all is said and done.

    Once each section of your piece is painted you will use a flat sealer to seal all of your paint and then go in and hand paint a gloss sealer on parts you want to look wet or shiny. The reverse if most parts are shiny.
    That's pretty much it! There are many variations on this technique; the main thing is all colors are built of multiple shades and each is placed by using layers on top of layers.

    Ethan Brackin
    www.acereplicas.com

    accepting sculpture commissions
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  5. #5
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    Reaper makes great acrylic paint and I use that for most of my figure painting. Also an airbrush is important if you are looking to really get the quality from the pictures you showed. Think about getting some books on regular acrylic and oil painting because to be honest the technique for painting figures is the same.

    Here is a very basic order for painting:

    assemble kit, clean parts and put epoxy resin or some other filler substance in all seam lines and sand or file until invisible
    Prime assembled kit
    Apply a base color, usually darker than the main tone of each piece. (usually start with clothing, then skin, then accessories)
    Apply darkest tone into crevices for shadow (all colors at this stage and every step following must be thinned as you will add them all in layers)
    Apply mid tone wash over section
    Apply mid tone color on all main surfaces, making sure to not get this layer on your shadows
    Apply highlights onto all major raised surfaces or anything that would be most directly in sunlight. (the idea is to create artificial light so the figure looks good under any conditions)

    Apply these steps over and over again with thinned paint to achieve the look you want. Sometimes it helps to do multiple steps in quick order so you can blend the tones together. I usually have 10-20 layers on each section when all is said and done.

    Once each section of your piece is painted you will use a flat sealer to seal all of your paint and then go in and hand paint a gloss sealer on parts you want to look wet or shiny. The reverse if most parts are shiny.
    That's pretty much it! There are many variations on this technique; the main thing is all colors are built of multiple shades and each is placed by using layers on top of layers.

    Ethan Brackin
    www.acereplicas.com

    accepting sculpture commissions
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

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