more sites for gesture drawing poses??
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    more sites for gesture drawing poses??

    i used posemaniacs and pixelovely and quickposes

    i want a new site to use because i keep getting repeat poses

    it doesnt have to be a site for specifically gesture drawing

    i saw a blog once that somebody made with a ton of random photos good for gesture drawing but i forgot the link

    help !

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    if all you are practicing is gesture the best places are your local coffee or book shop

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    if all you are practicing is gesture the best places are your local coffee or book shop
    why is it better to do gesture drawing in real life than poses?

    cuz thats what a lot of people say but what is the difference compared to just doing it from poses?

    also im still trying to learn gesture drawing

    would doing it from real life make me learn faster?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PiNECONE View Post
    why is it better to do gesture drawing in real life than poses?

    cuz thats what a lot of people say but what is the difference compared to just doing it from poses?

    also im still trying to learn gesture drawing

    would doing it from real life make me learn faster?
    Because you are translating real life into 2d instead of 2d into 2d. You will learn faster but it will be harder at first. If you just copy photos or use 2d reference you never really learn to draw very well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PiNECONE View Post
    why is it better to do gesture drawing in real life than poses?
    In real life, you need to make choices about the pose in space and time, from what angle to pick a pose, and when to freeze it. Also, you will have to make the step from 3D to 2D. Finally, you are forced to be fast, because no one really poses for you...

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    Quote Originally Posted by PiNECONE View Post
    why is it better to do gesture drawing in real life than poses?

    cuz thats what a lot of people say but what is the difference compared to just doing it from poses?

    also im still trying to learn gesture drawing

    would doing it from real life make me learn faster?

    Because when drawing from a photo you tend to copy shapes. When you put pen to paper you naturally just try and draw the lines u see and the flat abstract shapes. Which is not to say that isn't totally useless.

    When drawing from life, especially with quick drawings, you would have more of a tendancy to break things down into 3D blocks and build up. This helps you actually learn the object and how its built so you can construct it. Then you are actually learning the subject and you will eventually be able to play with it and rotate it and draw it from what ever angle from your imagination or from a slightly different angle from the Ref or whatever.

    That's not to say you cant do that from a photo but its much more natural a feeling when you are doing it from life. When you have done enough of it though it should be much easier to get into that mode when working from photoref also.

    Do both just keep in this in mind.

    Its a very different way of thinking mostly in terms of 'this line is slightly longer and slightly rotated.' 'That squiggle is a bit more squigilly.' Rather than 'this boxy shape of elbow interlocks with this spheroid shape shape here'

    Also note though its not that black and white, its still a continuum where both modes of thinking will be going on whatever you do.

    Its crazy I was asking that question about life vs photoref a year back and Dpaint and Jeff were telling me the same thing multiple times and its only now that I am really EXPERIENCING the difference.

    Last edited by Whirly; December 19th, 2012 at 04:25 AM.
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    Buy a wooden mannikin. Infinite gestures from the comfort of your own home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
    Buy a wooden mannikin. Infinite gestures from the comfort of your own home.
    If you want to learn to draw mannikins, draw mannikins.
    If you want to learn to draw real people, draw real people.

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    If you want to learn to draw mannikins, draw mannikins.
    If you want to learn to draw real people, draw real people.
    If you want to learn to draw real aliens, draw real aliens.
    If you to learn to draw real organic futuristic ships, draw real organic futuristic ships.

    Gesture transcends human form, regardless, its not like he'll stop drawing people once he has a mannikin. It'll be a step in the right direction from doing 2D to 3D gesture work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
    If you want to learn to draw real aliens, draw real aliens.
    If you to learn to draw real organic futuristic ships, draw real organic futuristic ships.

    Gesture transcends human form, regardless, its not like he'll stop drawing people once he has a mannikin. It'll be a step in the right direction from doing 2D to 3D gesture work.
    You do realize that this statement was silly, right?

    I'll change it to make it not silly.

    If you want to learn to draw real aliens, draw real animals.
    If you to learn to draw real organic futuristic ships, draw real ships, planes, boats.


    Better.

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    Drawing people in real life is great, for all the reasons stated above, but drawing people in coffee shops is pretty dull. People in real life take up a very limited range of poses. Sitting standing, walking and carrying are about all you'll see. It's hard to get a feel for torsion or foreshortening or body rhythm in everyday poses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OmenSpirits View Post
    You do realize that this statement was silly, right?

    I'll change it to make it not silly.

    If you want to learn to draw real aliens, draw real animals.
    If you to learn to draw real organic futuristic ships, draw real ships, planes, boats.


    Better.
    I agree with that but it was in context. Mannikins have similar form to humans just as animals have form to monsters, etc. I know, in terms of anatomical form, theres little similarity but if you're doing gesture, its quite similar. The point was on gesture anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
    If you want to learn to draw real aliens, draw real aliens.
    If you to learn to draw real organic futuristic ships, draw real organic futuristic ships.
    Excellent points! Now, there is a fair chance you will end up in a situation where aliens, or organic futuristic ships are not available, so you will have to improvise, just as you might find yourself in a situation without people, so you will be more than happy to have your mannikins around. You might be able to catch a flight to Thingamajiggsy Zeta 34 in the Nutcrackers Nebula, or walk out of the door into a subway station, mall or coffee shop. I don't know your situation, your options might be limited.

    Gesture transcends human form, regardless, its not like he'll stop drawing people once he has a mannikin. It'll be a step in the right direction from doing 2D to 3D gesture work.
    Gesture transcends human form, that is true, it includes energy, action, intention, character and a lot of other things a wooden mannikin cannot give you.

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    A wooden mannikin can only give you so much. Its made of wood just like keanu reeves, what do you expect?
    Like I said its better than sticking with 2d gesture work or twiddling his thumbs whilst he waits for his window of opportunity to visit a cafe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atreides View Post
    Drawing people in real life is great, for all the reasons stated above, but drawing people in coffee shops is pretty dull. People in real life take up a very limited range of poses. Sitting standing, walking and carrying are about all you'll see. It's hard to get a feel for torsion or foreshortening or body rhythm in everyday poses.
    Uh, No .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
    A wooden mannikin can only give you so much. Its made of wood just like keanu reeves, what do you expect?
    Like I said its better than sticking with 2d gesture work or twiddling his thumbs whilst he waits for his window of opportunity to visit a cafe.
    What is with everybody being too lazy to work from life? It shows in your portfolios by the way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    What is with everybody being too lazy to work from life? It shows in your portfolios by the way.
    Probably the same reason why people are too lazy to get into shape. Its hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atreides View Post
    Drawing people in real life is great, for all the reasons stated above, but drawing people in coffee shops is pretty dull. People in real life take up a very limited range of poses. Sitting standing, walking and carrying are about all you'll see. It's hard to get a feel for torsion or foreshortening or body rhythm in everyday poses.
    Push em over, spill hot coffee on them, throw things at them while hidden behind bushes. More poses that way.

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    Well on a serious note, you can find more dynamic poses in real life by just visiting the park or maybe even a public gym? I noticed some people are taking about capturing three dimensional form, well I have to say that in gestures you try to suggest it but the main objective is to capture the flow of the pose which wraps around a 3d form

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Uh, No .
    Uh, yes. You're right of course that you can refine subtleties by taking gesture principles and applying them to everyday poses. However if you haven't spent time sketching dance students busting out exaggerated gestures it's hard to get a feel for gesture from watching fat arses sip lattes.

    Narrative artists have to move beyond sitting and standing. I don't see a lot of people diving towards the viewer in extreme foreshortened views where I go to sketch people. You know as well as I do that if you want to be able to draw dynamic action poses speedily and fluently you're going to have to supplement the coffee shop sketches. Maybe coffee shops are different where you live, but I suspect you are just being contrary.

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    Uh, hello. There are more places to draw in the real world than Starbucks.

    Try public parks: people walking, running, doing yoga and tai chi, playing soccer, baseball, frisbee, messing around with hula hoops, playing fetch with their dogs, etc. etc. etc. UNLIMITED POSES.

    Try beaches: all of the above plus swimming and surfing.

    Try public music and dance performances: okay, got your extreme poses right there...

    Try sporting events: yep, more extreme poses!

    Hell, try nightclubs and dance parties - whacked-out poses AND funky outfits.

    Also actual life drawing sessions if you can find any. Any good session with good models will usually include a wide variety of short poses.

    (And those wooden mannikins are about as unlike real people as you can get, frankly... They have no weight, no movement, and the forms are all wrong.)

    One thing you don't get from most pose sites (and definitely won't get from a mannikin,) is movement and attitude and body language. Everything that gives a pose expression and personality. Knowing how to convey moods and reactions and intentions through body language is important for most kinds of illustration and especially for animation or cartooning. Observing real people closely is one of the best ways to study how people move and act; second best might be to watch people in movies, except of course then you're watching actors so you get... acting.

    Last edited by QueenGwenevere; December 19th, 2012 at 08:53 AM.
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    Why do people insist on being shut ins when drawing? Good art wasn't made by locking yourself in the room and limiting your perception. It was made by experiencing the world.

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    Why do people insist on being shut ins when drawing?
    I like those sites, they are nice for warm-up drawings at work. When I draw my coworkers and they notice what I'm doing, they give me additional tasks because they think that I must be terribly bored .
    Also long traveling times to cafes and bars after a nine or ten hour work day prevent me from visiting public places as often as I would want to. On the weekends though...

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    What I do is an hour of gestures a day from a website, then I try to do gesture drawing outside whenever I get the chance too. I normally do it on the school bus since the kids move around a lot

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiera View Post
    I like those sites, they are nice for warm-up drawings at work. When I draw my coworkers and they notice what I'm doing, they give me additional tasks because they think that I must be terribly bored .
    Also long traveling times to cafes and bars after a nine or ten hour work day prevent me from visiting public places as often as I would want to. On the weekends though...
    I'm not sure if you really need to defend it if it doesn't apply to you?

    Just saying that there are too many people relying too much on web sites and not drawing from life.

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    If you don't have a kid, offer to take one of your friend's to their school disco. As you won't know anyone (being a working mother I don't) you can sit in a corner sketching away.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PiNECONE View Post
    i used posemaniacs and pixelovely and quickposes

    i want a new site to use because i keep getting repeat poses
    it doesnt have to be a site for specifically gesture drawing
    i saw a blog once that somebody made with a ton of random photos good for gesture drawing but i forgot the link
    I was having exactly this problem until not much long ago. Then, I eventually found out that nudism life photo blogs on tumblr are a great, neverending source of [mostly] non-sexual poses from all angles of nude people of all ages and builds doing something, or in other words, being active. I'm not sure if I can post links here, but once you manage to find one, through reblogging links for each post you can quickly build up a list of similarly themed blogs from which you can take inspiration and reference for gesture drawing poses. It's not as convenient as those three websites you listed, but it's definitely something worth the time to check out.

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    Sorry for digging this thread up but I have a question. What if I couldn't have a chance to sit down at park/coffee/public place to do drawing from life ? Is there any other ways I could get better on gesture drawing ? Can I practice it from TV/film ? Since I don't have much free time in day, I just wanna find out another efficient way so that my head won't get distracted and I can focus on practicing. .

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    Quote Originally Posted by kinglucifer View Post
    Sorry for digging this thread up but I have a question. What if I couldn't have a chance to sit down at park/coffee/public place to do drawing from life ? Is there any other ways I could get better on gesture drawing ? Can I practice it from TV/film ? Since I don't have much free time in day, I just wanna find out another efficient way so that my head won't get distracted and I can focus on practicing. .
    You don't need to make a special outing to a park or public place to practice life drawing. Back when I had a day job I drew people on public transit, in the food court or cafeteria when I had lunch, in meetings, at home, and any time I had to wait for anything. Now, if you happen to be a person who drives to work and does hard labour all day and then watches the kids until they go to bed you won't have as many opportunities to sketch, but you can still take opportunities where you find them.

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