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Thread: Looking for some critiques.

  1. #1
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    Looking for some critiques.

    So, I was a game design major, but I felt the program at my school wasn't sufficient enough to get me to where I want to be. With a suggestion of a few individuals, I switched to a general art degree to use that as the basis for my 3D. After a while, I'm a little muddled now at whether I want to be a 3D modeler, texture artist, or concept artist, but all three would benefit from strengthening my traditional skill. I had my portfolio review, and I wasn't rejected, but I wasn't accepted to the BFA. Instead, I was accepted into the BA and was told I need to do a large volume of work and that my work was average. The individual who did my review didn't give specifics, and I am still wondering what are the specifics, thus I am posting here. Below is my portfolio that I submitted (taken with a cellphone camera, sorry). I just want a few comments and critiques on what I need to work on. Later, I will post on a strategy to elevate my work. For reference, my concentration is Painting.

    Literally rip apart anything and everything. I desperately want to get into the BFA track. Thanks in advance.

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    If you have any issues with any of the images, let me know and I will do my best to fix it. Thank you again.
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    I'm confused if your concentration is painting why aren't there any paintings? You seem like you don't have a basic understanding of fundamental drawing principals, light and shadow perspective, composition, anatomy. I would start by getting some books on the subject, Loomis books are good as is Drawing essentials Debroah Rockman, and spend as much time as you can drawing from life. No photos.
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    I'm in the foundation year which is compromised of Drawing I & II, Studio Fundamentals I & II and New Majors Colloquium. These are pre-requisites to all other art concentrations. Most of these are from life all except the top right one, which is from a photo. I cannot get Deborah Rockman's book at the moment, but I do have a few of the Loomis books sitting around somewhere. Anything in particular you recommend I start with?
    Last edited by FireToTheRain; December 17th, 2012 at 08:00 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireToTheRain View Post
    Instead, I was accepted into the BA and was told I need to do a large volume of work and that my work was average.
    That's blunt, but it's fundamentally correct. You've taken two drawing classes and "Studio Fundamentals" (whatever that is). You simply need to put in a LOT more mileage drawing from a live model, from still lifes, from your imagination, and copying photos. To work as a professional, you'll need to be able to create all day, every day, five days a week, fifty-ish weeks a year--and it's obvious from your work that you're not at that level yet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giacomo View Post
    That's blunt, but it's fundamentally correct. You've taken two drawing classes and "Studio Fundamentals" (whatever that is). You simply need to put in a LOT more mileage drawing from a live model, from still lifes, from your imagination, and copying photos. To work as a professional, you'll need to be able to create all day, every day, five days a week, fifty-ish weeks a year--and it's obvious from your work that you're not at that level yet.
    Actually, I'm only in my first semester which means I've done Drawing I and Studio Fundamentals I (2D foundation, which is basically 2D work painting, drawing, collage etc). Studio Fundamentals II is 3D work (sculpture). I'm trying to get up a bit before I start Drawing II and continue on during Drawing II in order to hopefully have a decent portfolio by the end of second semester. Could you point out some things that I could benefit from working on? I'm currently reading Andrew Loomis Successful Drawing.

    I do have other work that is not on me (in my dorm and I'm on winter break).
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    I would have to agree with what was said by others. You really need to put in the effort to learn the fundamentals. Even though you are taking classes, you should also be learning on your own as much as possible as well. You won't learn everything from your classes.
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    Well I already said but I'll repeat myself, anatomy , perspective, light and shadow.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireToTheRain View Post
    Could you point out some things that I could benefit from working on? I'm currently reading Andrew Loomis Successful Drawing.
    Not to be the bearer of bad news, but Fine Arts BFAs from most general-ed American colleges/universities are completely, utterly, absolutely worthless in the job market. My advice is to cut your losses. Quit whatever program you're in now, get a day job, and spend a year taking evening/continuing-ed drawing and painting classes with teachers who have some actual real-world experience. Then apply to RISD/SVA/Art Center/other first-tier design school. If you don't get in on your first try: lather, rinse, repeat.

    As always, just my two cents.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giacomo View Post
    Not to be the bearer of bad news, but Fine Arts BFAs from most general-ed American colleges/universities are completely, utterly, absolutely worthless in the job market. My advice is to cut your losses. Quit whatever program you're in now, get a day job, and spend a year taking evening/continuing-ed drawing and painting classes with teachers who have some actual real-world experience. Then apply to RISD/SVA/Art Center/other first-tier design school. If you don't get in on your first try: lather, rinse, repeat.

    As always, just my two cents.
    Unfortunately, dropping out of school is not an option nor is it a smart move financially at this point.

    I've decided to disregard most of the comments in the thread because I feel like most of the work above does not accurately show what I can do. I was reading Successful Drawing and found myself saying, yes, I know that. Yea, I know that. I think this is because I just started drawing and a lot of the projects above are before I learned something (for example, the contour drawing was 4 weeks before we did perspective) I'm will put effort into creating a final product tomorrow and use that piece as direction on where to go (plus I feel it would help to get more specific critique if I had one specific piece in mind). I would like to thank everyone above for taking the time to critique and I really appreciate all your thoughts and giving me a different perspective on some of the things I've done. I will probably bump this thread with the newer piece when I am finished. Once again, thank you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireToTheRain View Post
    I've decided to disregard most of the comments in the thread because I feel like most of the work above does not accurately show what I can do. I was reading Successful Drawing and found myself saying, yes, I know that. Yea, I know that. I think this is because I just started drawing and a lot of the projects above are before I learned something (for example, the contour drawing was 4 weeks before we did perspective)
    Well that's the thing, you see, I remember feeling the same way when I was in college (I was a bit arrogant then too), but it doesn't matter what you "know" you can do, it only matters what you have done. Whatever you know you're capable of, you have not proved it yet. No one will respect you for hypothetical skills, and nor should they.


    OK, also: Clean up your presentation - it's a bit slovenly right now.

    * Don't draw to the edges of the paper: make sure you have nice clean, straight edges. Mask them out if you need to. Measure and cut off any awkward bits of extra paper.

    * Be careful with your portfolio pieces: don't wrinkle them, smudge them, get them wet, get them dirty, etc.

    * Get some sort of case, folder, or binder to show your portfolio in. Don't just have a loose pile or stuff them in a pad of paper. It'll help if you plan it all out and make your pieces fit nicely in a given size. Don't put them in those plastic sleeve things, the glare messes everything up. If necessary, you can interleave them with clean sheets of paper.

    * Present yourself well: you don't need to wear a suit, but be clean and neat looking. This includes attitude. Be nice, polite, and honest.


    #2, of course: Get better artwork.

    * Spend more time on them. Other than maybe some figure drawings, I doubt anything with less than 20 hours into it will be worth showing.


    Here's a paintover. You need to measure. It doesn't look like you measured how big the eye was compared to everything else, so nothing's accurate. Establish a center lines very early on so you can measure off of them an ensure everything is parallel and symmetrical. And even if you plan on doing a full value drawing, do lines first. Actually, you can do a tight line drawing and trace off a copy to do a rendering. That way you get two portfolio pieces out of it. Your hatching kinda stinks. Doing it all in one direction is OK, but changing direction to follow the form is much better. Leaving out one side of the face is a bad choice - you lose all that interesting stuff and it makes you look lazy. Make sure you keep your values clear, you need much more contrast between the background and the dark side of the face.

    Good luck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Corlan View Post
    Well that's the thing, you see, I remember feeling the same way when I was in college (I was a bit arrogant then too), but it doesn't matter what you "know" you can do, it only matters what you have done. Whatever you know you're capable of, you have not proved it yet. No one will respect you for hypothetical skills, and nor should they.


    OK, also: Clean up your presentation - it's a bit slovenly right now.

    * Don't draw to the edges of the paper: make sure you have nice clean, straight edges. Mask them out if you need to. Measure and cut off any awkward bits of extra paper.

    * Be careful with your portfolio pieces: don't wrinkle them, smudge them, get them wet, get them dirty, etc.

    * Get some sort of case, folder, or binder to show your portfolio in. Don't just have a loose pile or stuff them in a pad of paper. It'll help if you plan it all out and make your pieces fit nicely in a given size. Don't put them in those plastic sleeve things, the glare messes everything up. If necessary, you can interleave them with clean sheets of paper.

    * Present yourself well: you don't need to wear a suit, but be clean and neat looking. This includes attitude. Be nice, polite, and honest.


    #2, of course: Get better artwork.

    * Spend more time on them. Other than maybe some figure drawings, I doubt anything with less than 20 hours into it will be worth showing.


    Here's a paintover. You need to measure. It doesn't look like you measured how big the eye was compared to everything else, so nothing's accurate. Establish a center lines very early on so you can measure off of them an ensure everything is parallel and symmetrical. And even if you plan on doing a full value drawing, do lines first. Actually, you can do a tight line drawing and trace off a copy to do a rendering. That way you get two portfolio pieces out of it. Your hatching kinda stinks. Doing it all in one direction is OK, but changing direction to follow the form is much better. Leaving out one side of the face is a bad choice - you lose all that interesting stuff and it makes you look lazy. Make sure you keep your values clear, you need much more contrast between the background and the dark side of the face.

    Good luck.
    Arrogance was not my intention, so I apologize for that. My intention was to state that I haven't done anything that represents what I know. I'm not asking people to respect me for skills I do not have, that was also not my intention, so I apologize for that too. I just said I wanted to work on a few new pieces of work that will be a little more accurate of what I do and do not know and to work from there on my self practice. Thank you very much for your paint over, you did not have to spend the time on it and I appreciate it very much. Measurement has always been one of my weaknesses (that and getting the scale of certain parts right). For these next few pieces I'll be sure to double and triple check my measurements. Thank you Mr. Corlan.
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    Arrogance was not my intention, so I apologize for that. My intention was to state that I haven't done anything that represents what I know. I'm not asking people to respect me for skills I do not have, that was also not my intention, so I apologize for that too. I just said I wanted to work on a few new pieces of work that will be a little more accurate of what I do and do not know and to work from there on my self practice. Thank you very much for your paint over, you did not have to spend the time on it and I appreciate it very much. Measurement has always been one of my weaknesses (that and getting the scale of certain parts right). For these next few pieces I'll be sure to double and triple check my measurements. Thank you Mr. Corlan.
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    I'm new to this forum, but I will try to offer you a fair and useful critique.

    Pay attention to light and shadows in order to create a balanced value. The horse looks a bit flat and proper shading can create depth. Continue practicing perspective to get an "eye" for the proper placement of your surroundings. Continue drawing from life and practice practice practice. Work on a few gesture drawings to get a feel for movement. Also experiment with different mediums instead of just using pencil. I hope this helps!
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