Sketchbook: Beginners Sketchbook! (Critique Very Welcome) - Page 2

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  1. #31
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    Did you ever think, that one day you'll be pissed at a clementine? I didn't either, until 2 hours ago.

    In fact, I got my revenge on this particular one by devouring it after the drawing session - it was indeed delicious.

    Or was I frustrated with myself? I believe I was.

    I also got a blending stone and pencils etc. Got free pastel samples! I like how they feel, but I ain't going into colour just yet...

    Anyways, I just couldn't see the values. I couldn't get the reflected light in, I couldn't get the transition tone in the middle correct. I couldn't get the shadow on the fruit relative to the shadow on the mat. Well, maybe in one of the charcoals I did get it relative. I couldn't detail the light side with a range of values, and the stem(I think it's the stem?) had some indentations going off from it, I tried to get them in in all of the drawings, but I erased that area because it looked horrendous. Yeah, tried a couple of times and failed.

    Well, maybe next time... Maybe. I just looked at the photo of the set-up, really light for some reason, use your imagination to darken it up.

    Oh and those drawings from yesterday, I'll post 'em whenever I take a picture of them. I'll just update the previous post.

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  3. #32
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    Name:  derpadsfdsa.jpg
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    I like the pot a lot more.

    Thanks for looking.

    Don't have anything on mind right now.

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  4. #33
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    Yeah, on this one I thought for half of the time I spent on it thinking why light hits where it hits. Turned out meh.


    ( Click to show/hide )

    4Chan my quote.

    Here, I finished this 10 minutes ago. I thought a lot about it this time, like, a lot. Half the time I spent thinking what the hell is going on and why. The camera is pretty different than real life, I tried playing with the contrast but that would make the light area all white.

    I'll try to tell you my thought process, and I also (professioanlly) illustrated the reflected light.

    First let's start with the huge tone change in the value. This one comes from the back wall and the rest. The blackest area of the shadow doesn't get hit by light from the back wall as the fruit is blocking it, so that makes it darker than that shadow.

    Area 2 is the next blackest thing, receiving little reflected light. It's the core shadow. Especially that stripe down the middle.

    3 Is the second part of the shadow that I already talked about.

    4 Is close to the mat, and the mat is reflecting lots of light onto it, so you can clearly see the tone change there.

    5 Is the gradient. I have no idea how those are formed, I imagine due to texture and bumps on the surface.

    6 Is the light area, I couldn't notice any value changes there.

    7 Is the highlight, being the plane that is at such an angle that reflects a lot of the light from the lamp into my eye.


    Am I Doing it rite?

    Point out anything that's wrong in my thinking, or anything that's missing. I tried to take all of this and include it in my own drawing which will be my next post.


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  5. #34
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    Apples, and oranges. Just kidding, only apples. The charcoal one is pretty bad.

    I've been running into the problem of defining the light side with planes and shapes.

    I've also been reading Art & Fear, interesting read.


    Thanks for looking.

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  6. #35
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    Don't get angry with the poor clementine D:

    Discipline is key, keep up the good work!

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  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquse View Post
    Any critique would be greatly appreciated, especially tips that help in the long run and just tips that apply to all of my drawings.
    First of all, good effort. Realize that there's nothing wrong with being frustrated. It happens to every artist... especially when starting out. Getting through that iron wall of frustration just depends on your persistence. It all comes down to you.

    Next, what kind of art do you want to do ultimately? Do you want to do these kinds of still lifes? Do you want to do fine art? Or do you want to do something else? Because if it's concept art--drawing characters and such--, this kind of study is a bit of a detour TBH.

    Learn construction. A great resource for that is Preston Blair's "Animation 1" book ($7 on Amazon). It does show how to draw cartoons; but the construction works for any type of object.

    Remember to think about the largest shapes first. Don't be tempted by detail (or in your case, by value). Learn structure first, because that will greatly simplify value. If your apple/fruit/veg shapes were a little more solid, the values you have placed would really look better.

    With better understanding of construction comes better understanding of perspective (another of your questions). Definitely don't worry so much about value yet. Much more important to learn solidity/volume/perspective, etc. Ask Bobby Chiu. Or any working, competent artist.

    Also, if you want to draw humans eventually... start drawing them now. Keep a sketchbook, and fill a page a day. Sit in a cafe, relax, and draw only the interesting people you see. Remember to relax... that's key. It's like fishing. The relaxed fisherman catches the most fish. Likewise, the relaxed artist captures the best characters.


    Good luck!

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  8. #37
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    I would suggest you to change the ground color from black to white, and the background to black, black color absorbs light and kills the reflected light which supports the depth. Try to put white paper under the apple and you will see the difference. Otherwise, good work, keep working hard

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  9. #38
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    I second what eclip-se said. Bounced light makes the form read better. A dark background helps to separate it from the background.

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  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by p sage View Post
    First of all, good effort. Realize that there's nothing wrong with being frustrated. It happens to every artist... especially when starting out. Getting through that iron wall of frustration just depends on your persistence. It all comes down to you.

    Next, what kind of art do you want to do ultimately? Do you want to do these kinds of still lifes? Do you want to do fine art? Or do you want to do something else? Because if it's concept art--drawing characters and such--, this kind of study is a bit of a detour TBH.

    Learn construction. A great resource for that is Preston Blair's "Animation 1" book ($7 on Amazon). It does show how to draw cartoons; but the construction works for any type of object.

    Remember to think about the largest shapes first. Don't be tempted by detail (or in your case, by value). Learn structure first, because that will greatly simplify value. If your apple/fruit/veg shapes were a little more solid, the values you have placed would really look better.

    With better understanding of construction comes better understanding of perspective (another of your questions). Definitely don't worry so much about value yet. Much more important to learn solidity/volume/perspective, etc. Ask Bobby Chiu. Or any working, competent artist.

    Also, if you want to draw humans eventually... start drawing them now. Keep a sketchbook, and fill a page a day. Sit in a cafe, relax, and draw only the interesting people you see. Remember to relax... that's key. It's like fishing. The relaxed fisherman catches the most fish. Likewise, the relaxed artist captures the best characters.


    Good luck!
    Thank you for taking your time to reply.

    The art I want to do is concept-art indeed. And yeah, I was looking for something else to do instead of still lifes to improve my drawing with lines, I just didn't know what. I've taken a look at your sketchbook, and it gave me a general idea.

    And I already have that book. But, since you've mentioned it I gave it a good go once again. Then I proceeded to try and implement those ideas for a while. Got a good couple of dozens images like.

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    Oh lawd, this one is horrible.


    Also Fun With A Pencil explains the construction concept quite nicely.

    Although, I can't wrap my head about applying this to an apple. An apple is just a sphere with randomized and uneven planes. I've never tried drawing planes. Maybe I should indeed focus on it.

    As for drawing humans, that ain't a bad idea. Anyway, thank you for your reply, I'll lay off the still lifes for a while(not completely, I'll do some still.) and focus more on construction. And I'm especially interested in gestural construction, I've always thought those loose lines that make up shapes and volumes looks very pleasing.

    Peter Han's instructional video also states to start out with a pen lines and focus on simple shapes, and interlacing them. Then moving on to organic, and then trying to implement that to do drawings from life. But yeah, in the last week I've been pondering on how to improve line drawing, still lifes are great but they don't teach me how to draw a squirrel from a cartoon.




    I've also been working on a flash game, sooner or later I'll need to draw a background for it, will post it.




    I have exams the whole week from now on, I'll still be posting though

    Thanks for reading and your replies.

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  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by zelda_geek View Post
    I second what eclip-se said. Bounced light makes the form read better. A dark background helps to separate it from the background.
    I didn't put the mat down and got a shit load of reflected light. Then I posted in the critique forum and s couple of people said that I was screwed from the start with this kind of setup, referring to a lot of reflected light.

    I'm in conflict now.

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  12. #41
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    Well, maybe. The desk looks kind of glossy so it might have given a lot of reflected light which made it look unnatural. Nothing wrong with either setup though. The challenge is to capture the light accurately.
    I'd still go for the dark background though, the drawings in post #32 are the best in my opinion.

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