Critique is needed
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Question Critique is needed

    Name:  Forest warrior 3.jpg
Views: 406
Size:  395.7 KB

    My mains issues so far:
    I have a problem with my character looking to flat
    Dont know how to light the background
    I want do get a bigger color range and contrast, but dont know how

    Please tell me evrything that you think could be better, it would be very appreciated

    Last edited by v3gar; December 9th, 2012 at 04:55 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    Thanks
    334
    Thanked 190 Times in 85 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    According to the cut and paste thread critique ,"The piece feels really flat because it is lacking any believable/dynamic lighting. Remember that form is shown through shadow"

    I like the idea of the piece,but it looks like his shield is a giant chocolate bar,and his hand holding the spear looks like its fused to it.

    Remember to do plenty thumbnails and get plenty of references for everything

    Formerly Ultimatum.

    A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor.

    Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    -Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Artimatum For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Something that stands out to me is the arm anatomy - you have a very bulky character there, yet his arm seems quite tiny and too short.
    As far as your character looking flat - aside from what was said above, I think his skin tone is rather lost in all the pastel colors behind him.
    The texturing on the shield and armor looks quite nice.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to AmeryB For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    590
    Thanks
    704
    Thanked 1,100 Times in 411 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yep, huge value issues are the biggest thing. Check it out in greyscale:
    Name:  Forest Warrior_originalgreyscale.jpg
Views: 261
Size:  40.7 KB

    You can hardly see a thing. If you squint a little, the figure is all one value, which is the same value as the ground, the castle, the mountains, and the sky.

    Also, you might want to think about your subject matter a bit? What this appears to be, is a very muscular and scary old man, wearing nothing but a belt, one pauldron, and a scrap of cloth which is blowing in the wind so we are in great danger of glimpsing his shriveled genitals. That's certainly not something I would immediately think to paint, but if it's what you want, I'm sure it could be pretty fantastic.


    So, Value Arrangement. Simple is best. This is one reason why you should do thumbnails: they're small, so you have to simplify. Picture what you want in your head, and maybe scribble some rough line thumbnails first, then go get references and start figuring out how you can make reality fit what you want. Here are a couple:
    Name:  2060_neuschwanstein_castle_schloss_neuschwanstein.jpg
Views: 260
Size:  57.2 KB
    Name:  READERPICbothalcastle.jpg
Views: 259
Size:  49.5 KB

    Some good refs should give you a good idea what your value arrangement will be like. In it's simplest form, this image might be just a silhouette—the dark figure and trees in the shadow, against a light background.
    Name:  Forest Warrior_2value.jpg
Views: 254
Size:  25.0 KB

    Add just one more value and you really have all the important stuff in your composition. With some different size stripes of light on the ground, we're starting to get some depth.
    Name:  Forest Warrior_3value.jpg
Views: 259
Size:  24.3 KB

    Then just keep refining it. If you keep everything in the background light, you'll have plenty of room for some value shifts in the figure without messing up the overall arrangement.
    Name:  Forest Warrior_allvalue.jpg
Views: 244
Size:  27.6 KB

    In line with the references, I've made the castle much smaller, and with more tall, narrow forms, so it looks less childlike.

    Gotta run. To be continued . . . (probably)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following 15 Users Say Thank You to -Ross For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    reply to : Artimatum
    It didn´t strike me as I was making it, but after you mentioned it i just wanted to eat the shield. And i will make more thumbnails and use more references from now on, and thanks for responding!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply to: AmeryB
    I will fix that arm, as i see whats wrong clearly now I am glad you like the texturing! And I will also try to fix his skin tone getting lost

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply to: Mr. Corlan
    I am very new to this site, and this is the first time I am posting anything here. And i got to say I was very pleasently surprised when i saw the response. I really appreciate that you took the time to do this, because this is quality information and really useful tips! Seeing the painting in grayscale, really makes it clear to see what the major flaw is. As for the character, my intentions wasn´t to make a male medievel hooker but more a fearless barbaric looking machoman. I see now that I wasn´t quite spot on and I need to cover him up a bit.

    You also made me realize the importance of thumbnail sketches and reference pictures( Which was also mentioned in the above posts), and how much the value arrangement will affect the impression of the picture as a whole. I also have a question: Do you recommend working in grayscale to practice values and then apply colors. Or should I work with colors and check the values in grayscale once in a while.

    I gotta say that last thumbnail sketch you made me see that my idea had potential to look good, and it got me really inspired to work more on it. I will post a update on the painting sooner or later when I have tried to apply the things that have been mentioned here.
    And thanks again for the constructive critisism

    Last edited by v3gar; December 9th, 2012 at 07:18 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    590
    Thanks
    704
    Thanked 1,100 Times in 411 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good. You're welcome.

    Haha. Well, if I was wearing a loincloth, I wouldn't want it flapping in the wind. Tighten it up a bit. Check out Frazetta, he does these sort of guys a lot. And your man looks old because of his baldness, large-ish ears, jowls, and his prominent veins.

    Hm, good question. Doing value studies is always good, but if you're doing a full-color, finished piece it can be hard to color in a black & white painting. So yeah, working with color and checking it in grayscale is a good idea. If you make thumbnails in B&W up to the point of my last example, you can work full-color from there and you shouldn't have to worry about your values too much.

    Here's some tips for the figure. You're proportions are way off. Now my example is a pretty average man, so if you want something more bulky, that's fine, but it's always wise to learn what's normal before you go messing around. It's also flat: no perspective or tilting masses.

    Also, here's a little mini-tutorial I did a while ago on torso anatomy: http://conceptart.org/forums/attachm...1&d=1337277536

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to -Ross For This Useful Post:


  14. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    590
    Thanks
    704
    Thanked 1,100 Times in 411 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Also, here's a way to draw figures from an inclined view. It doesn't really work for complex stuff, but for some things it can make your life much easier. You just draw an easy, 2D view of a figure on an angle and then carry the horizontals over.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to -Ross For This Useful Post:


  16. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    394
    Thanks
    190
    Thanked 240 Times in 143 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Corlan View Post
    Also, here's a way to draw figures from an inclined view. It doesn't really work for complex stuff, but for some things it can make your life much easier. You just draw an easy, 2D view of a figure on an angle and then carry the horizontals over.
    Dude, black magic! So that's how it's done. Any book recommendations that teach more figure-in-perspective tips?

    Sketchbook | Composition tutorial
    @LulieArt - Twitter, where I post useful links, tips, and neat art-related things I stumble across.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Dude, black magic! So that's how it's done. Any book recommendations that teach more figure-in-perspective tips?
    If you haven´t already, you should checkout Andrew Loomis-Figure drawing for all it´s worth
    Link:
    removed[/URL]

    Last edited by Black Spot; February 7th, 2013 at 03:08 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    221
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 47 Times in 46 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I was going to help, but honestly. You are getting SO MUCH help. I can't wait to see it when you've tried them out.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook