Giving good criticism

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 41
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    112
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Unhappy Giving good criticism

    I'm knew to all the technicalities of art, but I'm wondering how can I leave good criticism behind that would be helpful to other artists? Or does that only come after having attained a certain amount of experience??

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    762
    Thanks
    659
    Thanked 370 Times in 247 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just say what you like/don't like about the piece. In fact sometimes it's better to just get a normal opinion. My best crits come from my non-artist wife.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Shorinji_Knight For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    325
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 144 Times in 88 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I agree with shorinji_knight, it's sometimes really valuable to just get a normal person to say what they like and dislike about a piece. I get a lot more out of those comments than when beginners try to suggest improvements, because they usually forget to tell what actually made them not like something in the first place. So it can be really hard to try to dissect those comments to find out what was wrong with the piece. Really valuable points I like to hear are if you are connecting with the story of the piece, or if something is taking your attention away from it. Just hearing if the first thought that goes through your head is "oh cool battle" or "that shiny battleaxe is really pretty" because if it's the latter I know the storytelling and or composition have failed. So just going through points that grab your attention will be a big help for me to judge whether the piece is working like I'd want it to work. If something about the piece is making you uncomfortable, but you don't know why, just say that, it really helps.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Suncut For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    819
    Thanks
    397
    Thanked 796 Times in 280 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Whatever you say, don't say 'Shut up and draw' or 'Go learn your fundamentals' or 'Draw more things'. They are the most unhelpful and completely fucking obvious comments you can give.



    Jordan Beeston
    Sketchbook Livestream Infinity Wars
    Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing. - Camille Pissarro

    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    We do transmutational yoga and eat alchemy sandwiches and ride flying unicorns of esoteric freudian solipsism while googling anthropology. Whee!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Beeston For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    2,110
    Thanks
    801
    Thanked 910 Times in 455 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    non artist crits imo only matter if its important to you, if THAT person likes your picture. tastes differ, so it doesnt even tell you, if others would or wouldnt like it.

    its a whole lot different if you get crit from a professional, who can tell you how to actually make it better from a design point of view. knowing what to say only comes with experience and expertise.

    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    1,558
    Thanks
    205
    Thanked 583 Times in 335 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    I'll have to side with sone_one here. Obviously any criticism you get has the potential of being useful in some way, but that potential is a lot bigger if the crit comes from a pro or at least someone who's skills are more refined than yours.
    Personally I have found that there are mainly two types of crits "laymen" (meaning non-artists) give; either they overall like the piece and offer praise or they don't like the piece and try to explain why. Usually those explanations aren't very useful at all because they lack the knowledge and expertise to eplain why something works or doesn't work. What you'll get (at least that's my personal experience) in that case are laboured and "nitpicky" criticisms that often have a good intention but don't really help you in any way. A pro will tell you what is wrong with your overall design/composition/narration wheres a layman will tell you that they think some detail is wrong.

    Long story short, when you receive crits from laymen always be careful if that crit is technical in nature. If they had anything useful to say about that aspect they wouldn't be laymen.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Benedikt For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,758
    Thanks
    2,682
    Thanked 5,955 Times in 2,397 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you can't draw and paint with any ability why would you want to critique other peoples work? Out of boredom? An uninformed opinion is not only useless but annoying. As for telling people they need the fundamentals and to draw more that is the best advice you can give if you understand what you are talking about and they really need it. The fact that most people ignore that advice is evident just looking through the sketchbooks and WIP's on this site. Those are the people least likely to ever work as professional artists. I am happy to continue the practice to save the 1% or so who will take it to heart.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  14. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you don't know enough to judge the technical aspects of a piece, don't even try - you'll most likely end up giving garbled non-advice, or you'll just sound pretentious.

    I don't find "crits" from beginners or non-artists very useful. What I DO find useful is gut reactions.

    If, for instance, I draw a comic page and the reactions of casual readers are along the lines of "Ooh, what's gonna happen next!? NOOO don't let him get killed! OMG, that must've hurt!" then I know I probably did something right. If their reactions are more along the lines of "What's going on? I'm confused. Where did that guy come from all of a sudden?" then I have a hint that something isn't working.

    What is NOT useful is someone painstakingly trying to write a "critique" when they don't actually have anything to say or don't know what they're talking about, but think for some reason that they should write one of these critique-thingies.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to QueenGwenevere For This Useful Post:


  16. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,192
    Thanks
    2,384
    Thanked 2,344 Times in 1,448 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Beeston View Post
    Whatever you say, don't say 'Shut up and draw' or 'Go learn your fundamentals' or 'Draw more things'. They are the most unhelpful and completely fucking obvious comments you can give.
    To someone who constantly seeks attention by discussing their fears and justifying procrastination on the forums, instead of simply practicing, "Shut up and draw" is a proper and necessary response - their problem is not with the drawing technicalities.

    To someone who is naively copying contour drawings from anime without understanding the method behind constructing such drawing, and deludedly thinking that they are doing it right, "Go learn your fundamentals" is a proper and necessary response - their problem is not with the drawing technicalities.

    To someone who keeps redrawing the same stale face in every character and botches drawing everyday objects due to reluctance to do research, "Draw more things" is a proper and necessary response - their problem is not with the drawing technicalities.

    In other words, the answer can only be helpful or unhelpful in context, not as an absolute. And a lot of times, something obvious to you is far from obvious to another - if their mistake was obvious to them, they would correct it on their own and not ask questions here.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to arenhaus For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  18. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,192
    Thanks
    2,384
    Thanked 2,344 Times in 1,448 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    If you can't draw and paint with any ability why would you want to critique other peoples work? Out of boredom? An uninformed opinion is not only useless but annoying. As for telling people they need the fundamentals and to draw more that is the best advice you can give if you understand what you are talking about and they really need it. The fact that most people ignore that advice is evident just looking through the sketchbooks and WIP's on this site. Those are the people least likely to ever work as professional artists. I am happy to continue the practice to save the 1% or so who will take it to heart.
    Actually, it often happens that someone's skill in making things lags behind their awareness of such things. So they can see a mistake even if you think they personally aren't that skilled. (My understanding of the method usually runs ahead of my ability to use it - a consequence of me being rather analytical in my approach.)

    There is also the effect of a fresh look. We are staring at our own work for so long, we overlook things that could be obvious to the next random person to look at the picture for the first time. (I once spent an hour carefully drawing a character who, inexplicably, had two right hands. It was years ago, but I still remember the embarrassment.) So any fresh eye can do good. You can take a break from the picture for a few days, or you can ask someone to be your spotter for a moment.

    Many people who take up drawing aren't even aware that a systematic method of doing it exist. They either try to copy cartoon lines without knowing how to construct them, or try to copy photos ad lib. The situation is not helped by the slew of "how to draw" books on the market and tutorials on the net which are actually showing how to copy, not draw. And if such a habit is established, it takes very determined work to break it and self-enforce the proper method. (I learned to draw haphazardly like that, and as a result I still lapse into symbolic drawing if I am not careful enough. And I've been working systematically for years!)

    Though yes, practicing the fundamentals is something that should be done regardless of experience. It's a good way to keep in artistic shape.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to arenhaus For This Useful Post:


  20. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    I once spent an hour carefully drawing a character who, inexplicably, had two right hands. It was years ago, but I still remember the embarrassment.
    Ha, I've done that. That, and continuity errors (somebody has a bandage on their right arm on page one, suddenly it's moved to the left arm on page two, sort of thing...) Once I spent ages carefully painting a figure's bare feet and didn't notice I'd given them six toes until I stepped back for a longer view.

    So yeah, any casual spotter is great for that sort of thing. Your mom. Your roommate. Whoever's around, doesn't matter.

    What's not so great is if your mom (or whoever) starts saying things like "I don't like purple, I think it should be green," then you have to tell them to GTFO.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    What's not so great is if your mom (or whoever) starts saying things like "I don't like purple, I think it should be green," then you have to tell them to GTFO.
    Yeah seen that with pros and clients (which well you kinda have to follow too). It's the nature of the beast.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,905 Times in 2,546 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It is not easy to offer good critique and advice...but even harder to receive it and understand.

    I value two types of critique or observation of my work...the "gut reaction" that Queenie mentioned from collectors or viewers...and at the other end of things the critial analysis of my work from a technical standpoint by my peers. Everything else is just sort of "noise" and gets in the way...I see it all the time here. It can actually be detrimental in many ways or at best just useless.

    For 95% of the beginners seeking critique here, contrary to Beeston's opinion, the best advice is to "draw more and focus on fundamentals"...because that is the best advice for all of us. For people who can't figure out what that means their path in art will be short and filled with confusion.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  24. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    144
    Thanks
    200
    Thanked 50 Times in 30 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just something to add that I don't see here posted (yet). Just hope it helps and comes off as coherent.

    [Blind] Praise is not critique. One of the worst things you can do to an artist (especially a beginner) is give them too much of such, ignoring flaws and whatnot.

    Most people here already know what I'm talking about (insert popular art site here) which is why it's not said, but to elaborate for the hell of it: You'll often see people who like an artist's work go up to them give said artist a pat on the back about how good said work is (with varying levels of writing quality) that, ironically, doesn't give any indication on why it's good. While not bad in themselves (if not numerous), giving such when an artist is actively looking to improve is counterproductive, and should be replaced with actual advice. Unless the artist looking for straight up encouragement, in which case have at it. <_>

    The problem is that these comments in stupidly large amounts from all over the place whether they're on purpose or by accident (even here, even by hypocritical Artsy people), and it's up to the artist's job to sift through whats the "right" kind of critique and what's the "wrong" kind. To that end it's all about how objective you can stay in an every changing environment, and how much you can improve yourself when you take advice to heart.

    I hope that helps...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    I only say 'Shut up and draw' or 'Go learn your fundamentals' or 'Draw more things' because it's physically impossible to reach through the screen and start slapping.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Stoat For This Useful Post:


  27. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Google needs to get on that: googleSlap.

    The mobile version will be iSlap.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to QueenGwenevere For This Useful Post:


  29. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,083
    Thanks
    1,522
    Thanked 5,168 Times in 1,710 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Lots of good responses. I have just a few things to add:

    Lead your crit with praise. Always. Find something to like, and say it or write it first before getting into the meat of the crit. Art is personal, a kind of surrogate self, especially to young people who are not yet in possession of themselves. They must be led to understand that the critique is given out brotherhood, rather than animosity. Or else they will react instead of listen. And the whole process will be frustrating and a pointless waste of time.

    Secondly, if you are not a professional, tell your first impressions only. Do not attempt to analyze. Art can be notoriously tricky to figure out, and most people who make at least some of their money at art are completely clueless about composition, drawing, values, color, expression, and much else at at a technical level (relying instead on vital instinct to make their works work). Don't be the guy who gives wrong directions just because they "wanted to help."

    Last edited by kev ferrara; December 7th, 2012 at 07:49 PM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  31. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,905 Times in 2,546 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Lots of good responses. I have just a few things to add:

    Lead your crit with praise. Always. Find something to like, and say it or write it first before getting into the meat of the crit. Art is personal, a kind of surrogate self, especially to young people who are not yet in possession of themselves. They must be led to understand that the critique is given out brotherhood, rather than animosity. Or else they will react instead of listen. And the whole process will be frustrating and a pointless waste of time.
    Really good observation and advice there kev...something I need to be better at I think.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  32. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North'n Ironed
    Posts
    683
    Thanks
    117
    Thanked 172 Times in 122 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Secondly, if you are not a professional, tell your first impressions only. Do not attempt to analyze... Don't be the guy who gives wrong directions just because they "wanted to help."
    How many pros are there per active amateur here? And how many of those regularly critique Sketchbooks and Critique Center posts?

    ...which is only my opinion.
    Sketchbook Deviations
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  33. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Well, I spend time in Critique and I'm an unemployed pro. I know it sounds perverse, but in improving my own drawings, sometimes it's more helpful to me to see pictures that aren't working than to see pictures that are. CA is my main resource for both kinds.

    I look at many, many more pictures than I comment on, though. Honestly, for 90% of them, the only good response is, "cut the shit and go draw an apple for about a month." Or, "no, you are not the one uniquely gifted snowflake who gets to dispense with the fundamentals and jump right to the space marine fighting a mermaid on the rungs of a giant geodesic frame made of fire and water floating in the infinity of space."

    Kev is right that if you don't give them a bit of praise, the rest of your message may not reach them. But sometimes I really do feel like reaching through the screen and giving somebody a good slap. When I look at the five-star threads in Finally Finished, or the five-star sketchbooks, or any one of the galleries you reach from the thumbnails at the top of the site...I am awed and humbled. The best art here says to me, "sit up straight and put on your A game, Weasel; this is a serious place."

    Then you go to CC and somebody wants to know what you think of this scribbly thing they spent fifteen minutes on, and I want to go, "what I think is *slap-slap-slap*. Go draw an apple."

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  34. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Stoat For This Useful Post:


  35. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Wait...the thumbnails aren't at the top of the page any more. I didn't notice that with the redesign.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  36. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,083
    Thanks
    1,522
    Thanked 5,168 Times in 1,710 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    How many pros are there per active amateur here?
    A: 1:1,000?

    And how many of those regularly critique Sketchbooks and Critique Center posts?
    A: Not many

    But there are pros ready and waiting to help when you sign up for TAD classes, or buy TAD videos. And its good information worth paying for and it isn't all that expensive for the value. The site essentially switched a few years ago from mostly being pros volunteering information and critiques to a paywall model of that same service professionalized into a high-end digital classroom product. My sense is that a number of pros stopped volunteering information once other pros were being paid in a professional capacity to instruct through the auspices of this site. There's also the question of the downturn in the economy, and the globalization of digital art, which has simultaneously increased competition and lowered pay, thereby decreasing the free time of many pros and their ability to be as generous with their time as they once were. But these are all my opinions on the situation, and I wouldn't insist on them.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  37. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  38. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Oh. I didn't realize I was undercutting anyone's paid work.

    There's my joy in tatters.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  39. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,675 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't think the introduction of TAD actually had that much effect, certainly not as much as some behind the scenes politics and the rise of other forms of social media.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  40. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  41. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,180
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 2,357 Times in 1,211 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Even if you decide not to post critiques for fear of getting something wrong or offending someone, it is a good exercise to read critiques given to others and critique other people's work for yourself. Looking at other people's mistakes makes you aware of them, and then it's easier to ask yourself whether those are mistakes that you yourself make.

    You should have some experience of your own before giving critique, though, otherwise you'll be totally unconvincing if there's further interaction. It's easy to say "draw more from life" or "work on the basics" but then you're going to get questions like "why life?" and "what are the basics?" and if you haven't thought things through very well you'll just sound dumb.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  42. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,905 Times in 2,546 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    On the ratio of pros: amateurs...kev is probably right. I tend to offer quite a bit of advice, tips, whatever because I've been fortunate to have a broad career that touches on most things here (though I steer clear of things like animation, sculpting, etc. where I have very little pro experience). I get a bit frustrated from time to time as I sense my comments fall on deaf ears (also when individuals want to nitpick simply to be contrary) - but then I try to remember that there are many who just "lurk" who may benefit from what I have to share.

    Anyway, it's sort of in my genes to teach/mentor and at least try to share some of my experience with others...which is what keeps me here.

    Edit: Oh yeah...and I don't want Stoat slapping me through my screen!

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  43. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  44. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,083
    Thanks
    1,522
    Thanked 5,168 Times in 1,710 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't think the introduction of TAD actually had that much effect, certainly not as much as some behind the scenes politics...
    I understood there was a causal relationship between the two. Hadn't thought about the role facebook and twitter played. I'm assuming you mean in terms of pros' self-advertising, rather than the way in which young art students could get professional advice gratis online.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  45. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    1,238
    Thanks
    889
    Thanked 1,535 Times in 567 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'll be honest. I critique many hours a day 4 days a week in class and it's hard to get in the critique mode when I get on the computer. I only have spurts here and there in cyberspace and I look to promote and find some kind of professional comradery. Donating time with critique has almost become like donating time illustrating for me. To do it thoroughly really takes time and thoughtful consideration. Maybe that's why there is a lot of just get busy and draw and fewer crits from busy pros. Time really is money and I guess I applaud those who are willing to give it away so freely. But think of what you are asking when you ask for a detailed critique of your work. Is it the same as asking for a free illustration for you band's cd cover or a free painting for your wall?

    Just questions.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  46. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bcarman For This Useful Post:


  47. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,905 Times in 2,546 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by bcarman View Post
    I'll be honest. I critique many hours a day 4 days a week in class and it's hard to get in the critique mode when I get on the computer. I only have spurts here and there in cyberspace and I look to promote and find some kind of professional comradery. Donating time with critique has almost become like donating time illustrating for me. To do it thoroughly really takes time and thoughtful consideration. Maybe that's why there is a lot of just get busy and draw and fewer crits from busy pros. Time really is money and I guess I applaud those who are willing to give it away so freely. But think of what you are asking when you ask for a detailed critique of your work. Is it the same as asking for a free illustration for you band's cd cover or a free painting for your wall?

    Just questions.
    Yes, this plays a part of it, but I think the larger factor is that detailed, specific critique is not really possible in most cases here because 1) it won't really be understood and 2) it is almost always a simple lack of awareness and understanding of basic fundamentals. Thus the advice to focus on "just drawing" and "work on fundamentals" along with maybe a book recommendation or two in the appropriate area is really about the best one can do.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  48. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,758
    Thanks
    2,682
    Thanked 5,955 Times in 2,397 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've tried to give critiques as much as possible but it does take up a lot of my time to be doing so. I even try to do paint-overs if I think it can help but most of the time it falls on deaf ears; there are a few exceptions. The ones that I see make an attempt to correct their work gives me an incentive to comment again the next time they post. A lot of the time someone will come on after and say how perfect the image is at that point I just go away. I find I probably can reach more people defending a point of view on how to study or become a pro in the art discussions than doing individual critiques.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook