Any helpful critique is welcomed
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 19 of 19

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Any helpful critique is welcomed

    Hello.
    Any critique and advice is more than welcomed. I do not have any formal art training or courses so any literature or help is more than useful. Thank you for your time in advance.
    Name:  2mic.jpg
Views: 267
Size:  158.4 KB
    Name:  1mic.jpg
Views: 257
Size:  208.9 KB

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden, but originally from Amsterdam
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You need to pay closer attention to how the features of the face actually look like, and not how you think they look. Right now you have drawn the noses, mouth and eyes more like symbols, than how they look in reality. I once read about an exercise that involves copying a photo upside down, that way you learn how to observe better. I've never tried it before, so dunno if it's actually helpful, but just a thought (:
    Here you can find some really useful books.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Theeroos View Post
    You need to pay closer attention to how the features of the face actually look like, and not how you think they look. Right now you have drawn the noses, mouth and eyes more like symbols, than how they look in reality. I once read about an exercise that involves copying a photo upside down, that way you learn how to observe better. I've never tried it before, so dunno if it's actually helpful, but just a thought (:
    Here you can find some really useful books.
    Thank you. I will try that.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    sweden
    Posts
    444
    Thanks
    118
    Thanked 150 Times in 67 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Right now I think you're copying without understanding. Advice would be to get some anatomy books (loomis and bridgman for example) and keep a sketchbook with you to draw people.

    Rinse and repeat.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to mimer For This Useful Post:


  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    How do you consider that I should try understanding anatomy

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden, but originally from Amsterdam
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ptrspt View Post
    How do you consider that I should try understanding anatomy
    Mimer already told you; read anatomy books (Loomis is best for beginning I think) try them out yourself, and just draw a lot. Draw your friends and family, or just random people whenever you're waiting somewhere. You can also use sites such as pixelovely to practice, but drawing from life is always the best way.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Keep drawing anatomy. Like Mimer said Loomis (although his are very idealized which is a bit bland) Bridgman and also anything by Robert Beverley Hale. You need to be like a dog with a bone when it comes to anatomy, don't try and eat it all at once, just keep chewing.



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ok. Will do. Thanks a million guys. Running tomorrow to the library

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    63
    Thanks
    50
    Thanked 64 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Name:  guidlines.jpg
Views: 145
Size:  334.8 KB

    Use guide lines to keep the features aligned - you can find lots of such resources online in regard to measuring heads.

    Good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 228 Times in 148 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Don't only focus on anatomy, but on learning how to draw solid shapes with their proper proportions first and then with their
    correct, relative lighting and shading. Anatomy on it's own won't help you much if you don't understand volume, how to lay
    down shapes and proportions of what you see, and how light interacts with various basic objects. The best example, and from
    someone who has explained it a lot better is this by Ron Lemen http://www.anticz.com/drawing1.htm

    He also has a list of books he recommends, but if you focus on drawing the shapes he shows. Understanding how to look at, say,
    a cylinder, drawing it well and then modelling it well, which means understanding how light falls on it's surface and how it appears
    to us, then anatomy, as a tool, will make so much more sense.

    "Don't judge a book by it's cover" Frank Frazetta 1928-2010
    RIP Frank.

    DA gallery http://michaelsyrigos.deviantart.com/gallery/

    CA Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=131601
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Line For This Useful Post:


  13. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Line View Post
    Don't only focus on anatomy, but on learning how to draw solid shapes with their proper proportions first and then with their
    correct, relative lighting and shading. Anatomy on it's own won't help you much if you don't understand volume, how to lay
    down shapes and proportions of what you see, and how light interacts with various basic objects. The best example, and from
    someone who has explained it a lot better is this by Ron Lemen http://www.anticz.com/drawing1.htm

    He also has a list of books he recommends, but if you focus on drawing the shapes he shows. Understanding how to look at, say,
    a cylinder, drawing it well and then modelling it well, which means understanding how light falls on it's surface and how it appears
    to us, then anatomy, as a tool, will make so much more sense.
    Thank you. That was really helpful .

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    3,876
    Thanks
    2,300
    Thanked 2,244 Times in 1,360 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You need to learn to use construction lines and measurement, before everything else.

    Get "Successful Drawing" and "Figure Drawing for All It's Worth" by Andrew Loomis. These books show a much more solid method of approaching a drawing.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to arenhaus For This Useful Post:


  16. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    You need to learn to use construction lines and measurement, before everything else.

    Get "Successful Drawing" and "Figure Drawing for All It's Worth" by Andrew Loomis. These books show a much more solid method of approaching a drawing.
    It is true that i tried to go directly into drawing without preparing any background sketch or so. Thought that's how I should do it because the artist I've seen do it like this.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    3,876
    Thanks
    2,300
    Thanked 2,244 Times in 1,360 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ptrspt View Post
    It is true that i tried to go directly into drawing without preparing any background sketch or so. Thought that's how I should do it because the artist I've seen do it like this.
    Well, at least you now know first hand why the artist you've seen was doing it that way.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ptrspt View Post
    It is true that i tried to go directly into drawing without preparing any background sketch or so. Thought that's how I should do it because the artist I've seen do it like this.
    Be sure to train your eye and then check your measurements by stretching your arm out with a pencil or knitting needle. Strike first and then check not the other way round as this will train you to trust your eye. Learn to strike the overall shape and check its height width relationship, then place key landmarks - first brow ridge, then base of nose. Michael Britton ArtAcadamy has some excellent dvds on this with anatomy lessons included. tell him James Murch from England sent you



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Double post.

    Last edited by ptrspt; December 6th, 2012 at 04:59 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    LA LA Land
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    43
    Thanked 62 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Go out to the mall, park and beach and draw from life. Take some life drawing classes.

    Joining you in the ABCs of faith: Action, Belief and Confidence
    My web comics
    Just Create - my blog about how to create comic books
    YouTube Tutorials and stuff

    Howard
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    India
    Posts
    88
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Anatomy can be a bit tricky.even to learn...I had so many issues in the beginning..i still do..but it has become much better now...I think its important that you dont get overwhelmed by all the different ways and things you have to learn to understand anatomy...Forms, lighting, shapes, muscles, bones, proportions..all these words can be a bit scary...in my own personal experience, i have found tackling one issue at a time to be very helpful. Say, you get your hands on an anatomy book...say you start off on proportion...The average height for a man and a woman can be measured by the height of their heads. Once you understand that the height of a man from the top of his head to the groin area is this many heads and that the height from the groin area to the feet is that many heads, you'll get a more realistic figure. Once you understand the basics of proportion, start learning about individual parts like the head, or the arm or the legs..draw them from real life or photos (never from other paintings or drawings[not in the beginning at least..this is because every artist has his/her own style.in the way they define the lines that make up the figure]) Once you understand the shapes or form of these body parts, your drawings will become more real...There is no real structure or a certain way to learn anatomy..there are simply ways to make it more convenient for one to understand anatomy. Observe, study, draw, look at made drawing, find mistakes..and repeat..) You'll see amazing results in a couple of months...Dedication is very important..

    Well thats all...I am in no ways an expert or anything..these are just my thoughts...
    Hav a nice day..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Gautham View Post
    Anatomy can be a bit tricky.even to learn...I had so many issues in the beginning..i still do..but it has become much better now...I think its important that you dont get overwhelmed by all the different ways and things you have to learn to understand anatomy...Forms, lighting, shapes, muscles, bones, proportions..all these words can be a bit scary...in my own personal experience, i have found tackling one issue at a time to be very helpful. Say, you get your hands on an anatomy book...say you start off on proportion...The average height for a man and a woman can be measured by the height of their heads. Once you understand that the height of a man from the top of his head to the groin area is this many heads and that the height from the groin area to the feet is that many heads, you'll get a more realistic figure. Once you understand the basics of proportion, start learning about individual parts like the head, or the arm or the legs..draw them from real life or photos (never from other paintings or drawings[not in the beginning at least..this is because every artist has his/her own style.in the way they define the lines that make up the figure]) Once you understand the shapes or form of these body parts, your drawings will become more real...There is no real structure or a certain way to learn anatomy..there are simply ways to make it more convenient for one to understand anatomy. Observe, study, draw, look at made drawing, find mistakes..and repeat..) You'll see amazing results in a couple of months...Dedication is very important..

    Well thats all...I am in no ways an expert or anything..these are just my thoughts...
    Hav a nice day..
    Thank you kind sir. And thank you to you all. I am sorry I did not have time to reply to all of you. The information is a bit overwhelming right now. I borrowed Loomis Successful Sketching from the local library and I'm 'eating' it. Will post sketches afterwards. Thank you again.
    Have a nice day

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •