Please recommend me a good post-impressionism book
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    Please recommend me a good post-impressionism book

    And even better if it has impressionism in it too.

    I'm after lots of big plates (thats what they call art reproductions in books right?).
    I want to look at brushwork and composition and technique from lots of different artists in the genre I guess.

    Any help would be much appreciated

    Also...why DO they call them plates?

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    If you want to look at brushstrokes it's hard to beat Google Art Project. Here's the page for Seurat. Double click to zoom in ...and in.
    http://www.googleartproject.com/arti...eurat/4125003/

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    I don't have any book recommendations, but do go have a look at Gandalf's Gallery here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gandalfsgallery/

    Very high quality scans of a variety of paintings, including post-impressionists - just do a search for their names.

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    For understanding their art, I recommend looking at it above anything anyone ever wrote about it. You can get a rough biography on wikipedia. For art criticism, start with Google, and then flip through whatever library books you can find. To see the brushwork, either follow Brigg's advice, or even better, go to a museum and see it in real life. Here, some of these artists are considered fauvist or expressionist, but there's a lot of overlap:

    Paul Cezanne: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=326

    Edouard Vuillard: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1742

    Vincent Van Gogh: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=789

    Theo van Rysselberghe: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=381

    Franz Marc: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=153

    Georges Seurat: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=115

    Maurice de Vlaminck: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1747

    Edvard Munch: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1793

    Maurice Denis: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1743

    Paul Signac: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=459

    Zinaida Serebriakova: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1693

    EDIT: I almost forgot! Henri Cross: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=385

    Last edited by TASmith; December 3rd, 2012 at 02:49 PM.
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    If interested in Impressionist brushwork I would recommend these guys:

    John Singer Sargent
    Emile Gruppe
    John Carlson
    Carl Rungius
    William Wendt
    Edgar Payne
    Frederick Judd Waugh

    Contemporary painters
    Richard Schmid
    Matt Smith
    Clyde Aspevig
    David Leffel

    Edit: I also want to back up TASmith's advice to go to some museums and galleries to see work in person.

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    so far as American Impressionism, there are tons, but good ones to consider are:

    Winslow Homer
    Granville Redmond
    Remington
    Edgar Alwyn Payne

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    On my art collection, I combined impressionists and pointillists. If you just start this list at the end and work your way backwards, you'll find a lot of the big names in "post impressionism".

    French Impressionists/Pointillists:
    Monticelli, Adolphe-Joseph-Thomas (French, 1824-1886)
    Lapostolet, Charles (French, 1824-1890)
    Boudin, Eugène- Louis (French, 1824-1898)
    de Chavannes, Puvis (French, 1824-1898)
    Trouillebert, Paul-Désiré (French, 1829-1900)
    Pisarro, Camille (French, 1830-1903)
    Manet, Edouard French, 1832-1883)
    Vollon, Antoine (French, 1833-1900)
    Degas, Edgar (French, 1834-1917)
    Lepine, Stanislas (French, 1835-1892)
    Dufeu, Jacques- Edouard (French, 1836-1900)
    Fantin-Latour, Henri (French, 1836-1904)
    Prins, Pierre (French, 1838-1913)
    Carolus- Duran, Emile (French, 1838-1917)
    Sisley, Alfred (French, 1839-1899)
    Cézanne, Paul (French, 1839-1906)
    Bracqemond, Marie (French, 1840-1916)
    Fantin-Latour, Victoria (French, 1840-1926)
    Monet, Claude Oscar (French, 1840-1926)
    Bazille, Jean Frederic (French, 1841-1870)
    Morisot, Berthe (French, 1841-1895)
    Renoir, Pierre-Auguste (French, 1841-1919)
    Guillaumin, Jean-Baptiste Armand (French, 1841-1927)
    Duez, Ernst-Ange (French, 1843-1896)
    L'Hermitte, Léon Augustin (French, 1844-1925)
    Petitjean, Edmond (French, 1844-1925)
    Dubois-Pillet, Albert (French, 1846-1890)
    Vignon, Victor Alfred Paul (French, 1847-1909)
    Gaidan, Louis (French, 1847-1925)
    Caillebotte, Gustave (French, 1848-1894)
    Gonzales, Eva (French, 1849-1883)
    Lebourg, Albert (French, 1849-1928)
    Besnard, Paul Albert (French, 1849-1934)
    Raffaelli, Jean-Francois (French, 1850-1924)
    Houbron, Frederic-Anatole (French, 1851-1908)
    Schuffenecker, Claude-Emil (French, 1851-1934)
    Gervex, Henri (French, 1852-1929)
    Forain, Jean-Louis (French, 1852-1931)
    Goeneutte, Norbert (French, 1854-1894)
    de La Touche, Gaston (French, 1854-1913)
    Angrand, Charles (French, 1854-1926)
    Petitjean, Hippolyte (French, 1854-1929)
    Duvieux, Henri (French, 1855-1920)
    Cross, Henri Edmond (French, 1856-1910)
    Moret, Henri (French, 1856-1913)
    de Monfried, Georges - Daniel (French, 1856-1929)
    Clary, Eugène (French, 1856-1930)
    Abel-Truchet, Louis (French, 1857-1918)
    Osbert, Alphonse (French, 1857-1939)
    Luce, Maximilien (French, 1858-1941)
    Lucas-Robiquet, Marie Aimée Elaine (1858–1959)
    Seurat, Georges (French, 1859-1891)
    Helleu, Paul César (French, 1859-1927)
    Laurent, Ernest-Joseph (French, 1859-1929)
    Levis, Maurice (French, 1860-1940)
    Martin, Henri (French, 1860-1943)
    Gausson, Léo (French, 1860-1944)
    Maufra, Maxime (French, 1861-1918)
    Charderon, Francine (French, 1861-1928)
    Anquetin, Louis (French, 1861-1932)
    Blanche, Jacques Emile (French, 1861-1942)
    Lauge, Achille (French, 1861-1944)
    Roy, Lucien (French, 1862-1907)
    Le Sidaner, Henri (French, 1862-1939)
    DeLavallee, Henri (French, 1862-1943)
    Madeline, Paul (French, 1863-1920)
    Cottet, Charles (French, 1863-1924)
    Prunier, Gaston (French, 1863-1927)
    Signac, Paul (French, 1863-1935)
    Pissaro, Lucien (French, 1863-1944)
    Donnadieu, Jeanne (French, 1864-unknown)
    Toulouse- Lautrec, Henri de (French, 1864-1901)
    Darien, Henri Gaston (French, 1864-1926)
    du Puigaudeau, Ferdinand (French, 1864-1930)
    Charreton, Victor (French, 1864-1936)
    Hayet, Louis (French, 1864-1940)
    Riviere, Henri (French, 1864-1951)
    Loiseau, Gustave (French, 1865-1935)
    Lebasque, Henri (French, 1865-1937)
    Valadon, Suzanne (French, 1865-1938)
    Lévy -Dhurmer, Lucien (French, 1865-1953)
    Cachoud, François-Charles (French, 1866-1943)
    Ibels, Henri Gabriel (French, 1867-1936)
    Roussel, Ker-Xavier (French, 1867-1944)
    Seyssaud, René (French, 1867-1952)
    Lacombe, Georges (French, 1868-1916)
    Vuillard, Édouard (French, 1868-1940)
    Valtat, Louis (French, 1869-1952)
    d'Espagnat, Georges (French, 1870-1950)
    Wilder, Andre (French, 1871-1965)
    Portau, Leon (French, 1872-1897)
    Burnat-Provins, Marguerite (French 1872-1952)
    Pavil, Elie Anatole (French, 1873-1948)
    Montézin, Pierre-Eugene (French, 1874-1946)
    Verdilhan, Louis Mathieu (French, 1875-1928)
    Laprade, Pierre (French, 1875-1931)
    Marquet, Albert (French, 1875-1947)
    Hoffbauer, Charles (French, 1875-1957)
    Puy, Jean (French, 1876-1960)
    Cotard-Dupre, Therese Marthe Francoise (1877-?)
    Ottmann, Henri (French, 1877-1927)
    Chabaud, Auguste (French, 1882-1955)
    Cortes, Edouard Léon (French, 1882-1969)
    Utrillo, Maurice (French, 1883-1955)
    Mossa, Gustave Adolphe (French, 1883-1971)
    Leroy, Camille (French, 1905-1995)

    Louis Valtat's really good: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=1704

    And Vallotton is even better: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...a&s=tu&aid=398

    Hammershoi's freaky. He can make a chair creepy: http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/lis...&s=tu&aid=2536

    Hammershoi presents an interesting challenge to art historians. How do you classify an artist who paints realistically, after art has already "progressed" into impressionism/post impressionism, when his work doesn't fit in well with realists either, because the subject matter is so odd. The answer, you ignore him.

    Last edited by TASmith; December 3rd, 2012 at 02:47 PM.
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    Wow TA - that Hammershoi is really interesting. Really a very modern, ahead of his time kind of view on things. Thanks for the note on him. I love those interiors..."The Old Cabinet Sofa" stands out for me.

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    Awesome, thanks all. Loving the gandalfsgallery site.

    Epic list TA, ill have a poke around.

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    Those are the French ones. I divided it by country. If you want more let me know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    Hammershoi presents an interesting challenge to art historians. How do you classify an artist who paints realistically, after art has already "progressed" into impressionism/post impressionism, when his work doesn't fit in well with realists either, because the subject matter is so odd. The answer, you ignore him.
    Nah, you just lump him in with "Symbolism" or sometimes "Art Nouveau", everybody's favorite catch-alls for oddball artists...

    Speaking of symbolism, if you look up symbolism, the Nabis, divisionism, and fauvism, you'll find a lot of artists who are also classified as "post-impressionists". (There's a lot of fuzzy crossover art in the late nineteenth-early twentieth centuries.)

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    Wasn't Malevich a symbolist?

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    It seems like everyone was a so-called "symbolist" at some point in their career... According to some of my books on symbolism, anyway. But it's such a vague term, you can stick it on anyone working around the turn of the century.

    I do remember a lot of Russian Constructivists started out doing rather fantastical art-nouveau flavored work, though, I wouldn't be surprised if Malevich qualified as a symbolist early in his career.

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