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Thread: No patience is bad for an artist?

  1. #31
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
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    Yo BlackSpot...what's a Brague?

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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  2. #32
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Art is the process of making art, it is not the money or recognition. Too many people focus on the possible rewards for successful artists, that's not being an artist. An artist is compelled to express themselves through their art, period. Everything else is just icing on the cake and makes being an artist easier. If you don't act to express yourself then you will never be an artist.

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  4. #33
    Black Spot's Avatar
    Black Spot is online now Pew, Pew, Pew Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by OmenSpirits View Post
    Yo BlackSpot...what's a Brague?
    Bargue - it's called a typo. Live with it.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    A Brague is what you get when you cross a Braque with a Bargue.

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  7. #35
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    Bargue - it's called a typo. Live with it.
    But, but, I cain't?

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceddo View Post
    The difficult part is continuously realizing when you've stopped enjoying the process, and re-aligning yourself. It's kind of like meditation/being an art ninja..
    This is one awesome quote. Can I add it to my sig?



    Check these out too:
    Rotor - GoGoJoJo

    "Limited drawing skills are OK if they are offset by a fearless commitment to putting images on paper."

    "I mean, What is a chair? It's an anti-gravity device." Glen Keane

    "The difficult part is continuously realizing when you've stopped enjoying the process, and re-aligning yourself. It's kind of like meditation/being an art ninja..." ceddo
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  9. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    A Brague is what you get when you cross a Braque with a Bargue.
    Yup, and in practice it means spending six weeks reproducing a simple line drawing, to absolute perfection. :-)

    ____________________________________________
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    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
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  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kjesta View Post
    Can I add it to my sig?
    Sure hehe, be my guest

    My Portfolio

    My Sketchbook
    Please feel free to add a comment, I appreciate all feedback!
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  11. #39
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    Am I the only mod that people feel they can mock and get away with it? If I growl a bit, would you show me a bit more respect? I scan read documents at over 2000 words per minute, I don't read words aloud in my head, which means I don't always remember how to spell things correctly, but I know what I meant. The rest of you just need to be more telepathic.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Oh, no. I feel sure I've made fun of all of them at some point or other. Nothing personal; I was born with a double copy of the mod-teasing gene.

    I also make faces at dogs locked in cars. I'm hoping my last words are, "sure, I guess one more won't kill me." Or maybe, "hell, yes, this'll take my weight!"

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    I am not sure this applies everybody, but if I ever do completed artwork I prefer to do it in one sitting. It may sound weird but when I am really deep into working on a piece it's like as if I am blocked from what is going on around me as in where I feel that the only thing that exists is me and the work that I am doing. Normally the hardest part is in the beginning where I have this awareness of what is going on around me and I easily get distracted by it so what I do is put on headsets listen to music to sort of ease me into that trance of focus between me and my work. I normally put on something which is very light like a chillstep mixtape. I know it does not sound as technical as how other people talk about spending longer time in their drawings but there is my two cents.

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    Doing fast stuff or spending little time on them isn't necessarily the same as doing them impatiently. Whether you tend to do things quick or take your time with them is imo more dependent on personal tastes is art and creativity etc.
    But if you want to do thorough, timely pieces and you actually do feel you can't be arsed then yeah, you have an issue. If you say you spend hours on a piece and it still looks rough then it's a classic case of little experience and skill. Since you don't really know what you're doing, you get bored and maybe discouraged since you don't know whether what you're doing will end up looking good. I think you're putting too high hopes on your timely pieces, you want them to be the be all end all and if they aren't you give up. You just need to practice, practice, try something new, practice...

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  18. #43
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    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamikazel33t View Post
    I am not sure this applies everybody, but if I ever do completed artwork I prefer to do it in one sitting. It may sound weird but when I am really deep into working on a piece it's like as if I am blocked from what is going on around me as in where I feel that the only thing that exists is me and the work that I am doing. Normally the hardest part is in the beginning where I have this awareness of what is going on around me and I easily get distracted by it so what I do is put on headsets listen to music to sort of ease me into that trance of focus between me and my work. I normally put on something which is very light like a chillstep mixtape. I know it does not sound as technical as how other people talk about spending longer time in their drawings but there is my two cents.
    Actually no, for completed work, I feel it's better to take breaks from it. That's why I said "you have permission to take breaks" You may never know when you're stuck in a certain mode and didn't step back from it to come back later to take a second look at it with a fresh eye. This does not mean that all works have to be done this way, but a lot of beginners don't really take breaks, the feel of "gotta finish this NAO" seems to actually hold you back.

    It's ok to step away and then come back and see "oh that's where I went wrong" and take the next step.

    Instead of treating your artwork like a fighting game, you can treat it like a quest/RPG. You know RPGs take time, you're not going to finish an RPG in one sitting. So it's ok. As you get better, this does go faster and eventually like an RPG you gain experience and level up

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  20. #44
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    I don't know where this "one sitting" thing comes from... If you're doing something really polished or complex, of course it's not going to get done in one sitting. The old masters often took months to finish a painting. Years, even. It really depends what you're doing. Some things can be done all in one sitting, some can't. (For instance, if you take up traditional glazing techniques, that ain't gonna be one sitting, no way, no how.) So yeah, breaks are fine, and can even be beneficial. (Like Arshes says, breaks are good for spotting mistakes...)

    If you're not on a deadline where it really DOES need to get done today, it's totally okay to work on things in short stages - maybe an hour or a few hours per session, whatever works for you. For those with short attention spans, maybe a good approach would be to work on several pieces at once - so you might work for twelve hours, but you only spend a couple of hours at a time on any individual piece.

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