How to take full advantage of an art book.
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    102
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    How to take full advantage of an art book.

    Hi everybody.

    I have a general enquiry regarding art books. (Loomis, Bridgeman, Hogart)

    How do I take full advantage from the book? Should I read through as if it was a normal book? Should I copy all the images and concepts in there?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just place it under your pillow after you made a sacrifice to the God/Gods of your choice.

    I dunno about anyone else but when I get books, I read them, not take advantage of them...book rape is not cool

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mölndal, Sweden
    Posts
    2,773
    Thanks
    2,379
    Thanked 1,911 Times in 832 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Do whatever it takes to get the information out of it and into your head. (Note: This does not mean it's a good idea to rip out the pages and stuff them in your ears.)

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

    Sketchy Link

    Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to tobbA For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sacramento ca,
    Posts
    204
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    i like to read the book first then do the copying of the studdys take what you can from it and discard the rest.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,710
    Thanks
    2,942
    Thanked 1,819 Times in 936 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Whenever I want to take advantage of a book I buy it dinner and ply it with booze.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Star Eater For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,658
    Thanks
    2,628
    Thanked 5,887 Times in 2,359 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Most art books will tell you to read the book first from cover to cover and then go back to the beginning and copy each picture to solidify the concepts. Copy each picture as many times as it takes until it looks exactly like the pictures in the book all the time rereading the accompanying text to make sure you understand what is going on.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    785
    Thanks
    100
    Thanked 271 Times in 198 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You are approaching it strangely like you are doing something for the sake of doing it. What is it exactly you want to gain from studying from the book? Is it wanting to construct humans from simple forms (for examples sake)?

    If so, you start with:
    - I want to learn how to construct humans
    - Bridgman shows a way of using cubes and interlocking forms to construct humans
    - He explains about interlocking cubes for the major masses
    - The text says why and what to think about
    - Look, he has drawn these cubes to represent things so I will do that, I could copy his or just do my own and see if I can do what he is doing. I will keep trying to describe the major masses using cubes like he is and then see what he does next and try to do that.

    You want to learn HOW to do what he is doing.

    Its NOT:
    - Bridgman is a good artist
    - This drawing looks good I will replicate the lines
    - Maybe I should read it too. I'l ask.

    Thats why the question seems silly.

    Start with a problem to solve and use the book as a tool to solve it!

    -----------------------------------------
    My Sketchbook
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...234403&page=10
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Whirly For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  13. #8
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Damn Whirly...right on the money there!

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  15. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Normally if the book expects you to do anything but read it, it will TELL you so when you read it. Otherwise it's up to you. Read the book and if it gives you ideas for things to try, try them.

    If the book gives suggestions for exercises, try them. If it describes principles and techniques, experiment with them. If you really want to copy all the pictures, I suppose you could, but usually it's the ideas in the text that are important, and what you want to be doing is learning to understand those ideas and applying them to your own work. How you go about understanding them is up to you. Reading the book is generally a recommended first step to understanding the book.

    So... read the book and find out?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    758
    Thanks
    656
    Thanked 367 Times in 244 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Skim them until you find something useful, read that part very carefully, then go back to skimming. Do whatever drawing/painting nessisary to help you understand. All that matters is that you understand and learn, nothing says you have to read all the boring parts.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #11
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Shorinji_Knight View Post
    Skim them until you find something useful, read that part very carefully, then go back to skimming. Do whatever drawing/painting nessisary to help you understand. All that matters is that you understand and learn, nothing says you have to read all the boring parts.
    Well how do you know what is boring until you read it?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  19. #12
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,658
    Thanks
    2,628
    Thanked 5,887 Times in 2,359 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've changed my mind.
    Forget about reading, its too hard. Just wait till someone makes an audio book or a video about it. Then you don't have to worry about mispronouncing the words as you read out loud.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  21. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    71
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Whirly View Post
    Start with a problem to solve and use the book as a tool to solve it!
    That's really good if you know what the problem is.

    What if you don't know what the problem really is? But in general you know
    you are not as good as you want your work to be or look like??

    I am currently working through Loomis, fun with pencils...page by page, drawing
    everything and doing as instructed....

    Is it possible that I could be working more efficiently?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    402
    Thanks
    280
    Thanked 98 Times in 83 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I like to give the book roofies so it can't fight back.
    sometimes you can wait until it's asleep, but make sure the book is a sound sleeper first.

    I learned in first or fourth grade (so I may be a bit rough on reciting this) that there are four main ways people tend to learn.

    Auditorially,
    visually,
    writing/ drafting,
    and
    doing it.

    These all have cooler psychology names, but I forgot those. basically some people learn best by hearing the information, others by seeing the information, others by taking notes on the information, and lastly by actually doing the information.
    All four ways will teach you, but some are more inclined to learned one way or another. A good teacher normally tries to make their assignments use all four. they give a lecture on the assignment as you take notes. you then read over the text and your notes, and then you do your homework putting into practice the principals you have learned.

    How do you use this on a book?
    Read it, take notes on it, put into practice what you learn about it, and watch videos/ have someone read the information to you.

    that's how best to take "advantage" of a book.
    learn the information stored within.
    and wear protection. you never know where the book might have been.

    Fudge this AWESOME place!!!

    My SKETCHBOOK: please critique! i can take it!

    To limit one's maximum knowledge is to maximize one's limits.

    Sanity is wasted on the boring.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    758
    Thanks
    656
    Thanked 367 Times in 244 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Well how do you know what is boring until you read it?
    By skimming, speed reading, you know... picking out key words and phrases. Most art books are almost worthless once you reach a certain skill level; some aren't worth much at any skill level. I have found though that even the most seemingly worthless ones usually have at least one idea worth considering, but you have to learn how to look for the gems buried in the mundane. On the other hand some art books are so full of wisdom that you're compelled to read every word. Andrew Loomis's books are solid genius, so are James Gurney's, and a handful of other less notables. The thing is each person has different needs, so they'll be looking for different things.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 497 Times in 270 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Shorinji_Knight View Post
    Most art books are almost worthless once you reach a certain skill level; some aren't worth much at any skill level.

    ...what books are you reading?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    758
    Thanks
    656
    Thanked 367 Times in 244 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Everything my local libraries have. Most of them, few people have probably ever heard of. I have read literally hundreds art books over the years.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm definitely not anti-reading.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sacramento ca,
    Posts
    204
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by themegagod View Post
    I like to give the book roofies so it can't fight back.
    sometimes you can wait until it's asleep, but make sure the book is a sound sleeper first.

    I learned in first or fourth grade (so I may be a bit rough on reciting this) that there are four main ways people tend to learn.

    Auditorially,
    visually,
    writing/ drafting,
    and
    doing it.

    These all have cooler psychology names, but I forgot those. basically some people learn best by hearing the information, others by seeing the information, others by taking notes on the information, and lastly by actually doing the information.
    All four ways will teach you, but some are more inclined to learned one way or another. A good teacher normally tries to make their assignments use all four. they give a lecture on the assignment as you take notes. you then read over the text and your notes, and then you do your homework putting into practice the principals you have learned.

    How do you use this on a book?
    Read it, take notes on it, put into practice what you learn about it, and watch videos/ have someone read the information to you.

    that's how best to take "advantage" of a book.
    learn the information stored within.
    and wear protection. you never know where the book might have been.
    joking aside one time i was looking at some art related books at a local barnes and nobles and then out of nowhere i had flu symptoms... i caught a virus i was out of it for 2 weeks....so yah have some hand sanitizer by you at all times.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    102
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks a lot people. A lot of useful information. And pardon my english..don´t "take advantage" of that fact to mock (kidding)

    I know that there´s a lot of important stuff in those books for sure and I´ve learned that there´s really no perfect method for anything in art.

    I struggle a lot with the fact of wanting to see like a real artist does.. I wish that could be explained in books. Looking at things not as our brain thinks about them but as we really see them.. I even tried the book "Drawing on the Right Side of The Brain", and eventhough it opened my horizons a bit I feel like I didn´t completely get what was meant...I don´t know maybe I should learn english first

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Goremageddon For This Useful Post:


  29. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,710
    Thanks
    2,942
    Thanked 1,819 Times in 936 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It always makes me happy when I find people here with a sense of humor who can laugh at themselves/their threads.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Star Eater For This Useful Post:


  31. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    785
    Thanks
    100
    Thanked 271 Times in 198 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by wannabeanimator View Post
    That's really good if you know what the problem is.

    What if you don't know what the problem really is? But in general you know
    you are not as good as you want your work to be or look like??

    I am currently working through Loomis, fun with pencils...page by page, drawing
    everything and doing as instructed....

    Is it possible that I could be working more efficiently?
    You do know what the problem you have just said what it is "But in general you know you are not as good as you want your work to be or look like" Its not very specific, make it more specific. Is it your figures? heads? what is it that you are drawing that you want to improve on. Its no good replying "everything." You cant do everything at once so pick something. If its heads for example then why just jump to Loomis for example? Is it because Loomis shows a cool way of starting from spheres so that the features wrap around form and you think this 3D effect would improve your heads? (again purely for example.)

    So then you have "I want to create heads using a spherical abstraction like Loomis does" then you use what Loomis teaches to learn to do it yourself.

    You CAN just sit and copy the images without a goal and you CAN learn that way but having the goal there seems to make a whole lot more sense.

    Then you can do his exercises, try some on your own try and apply it (if its applicable) to life/ref. See if you are doing it right. If you are still having problems re-read and re-study. Still having problems ask on your sketchbook or a thread or whatever.

    You are no longer "Doing a book" you are actually using the book.

    -----------------------------------------
    My Sketchbook
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...234403&page=10
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  32. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Whirly For This Useful Post:


  33. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    2,110
    Thanks
    801
    Thanked 909 Times in 455 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Goremageddon View Post
    I struggle a lot with the fact of wanting to see like a real artist does.
    youll get there by gathering theoretical knowledge and practical experience. i tend to learn a lot by reading books, trying to get the concepts behind them into my head. others are different.

    dont stress it, just read and watch and observe and ask and practise and basically challenge yourself... go at your own pace. theres no secret knowledge.. just a few guidelines.

    also i smell a slight misconception when it comes to "seeing like an artist". alot of the pictures you see are the result of alot of time and effort (for the actual picture, and even ALOT more before even attempting it). it appears easier than it is. i think creating pictures is always challenging, no matter what level you are at, because theres so many factors and options, you always could have done better (from the pov of having gone through it).

    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  34. The Following User Says Thank You to sone_one For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •