Sketchbook: Constructive critique needed: what am I doing wrong while drawing?
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Thread: Constructive critique needed: what am I doing wrong while drawing?

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    Constructive critique needed: what am I doing wrong while drawing?

    I'm just starting to draw and I really enjoy it. Unfortunately, I must be doing something wrong as my lines look horrible. Am I pressing a pencil too strong? My drawings look so unnatural and messy. Is it just a matter of practice or should I do it differently?

    I especially like the boy in a hoodie but at the same time on this drawing you can see the most what I'm talking about, have a look at how bad my lines look. What am I doing wrong?

    BTW, these are all based on what I could find on the Internet, I can't draw from memory.

    Any advice for someone who's just beginning the adventure with drawing?

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    Monicax, firstly, welcome to the boards. CA is a wonderful place to begin -- as you put it -- 'the adventure with drawing'. I'm sure that if you stick around, and continue drawing, you'll eventually become as competent with art as you want to be.

    As for your current issue, I'm afraid that the answer lies in more drawing. You need to practice, not only from artworks from the internet, but also from real-life, and if necessary, photographs. Walt Stanchfield once said, 'We all have ten thousand bad drawings in us. The sooner we get them out the better.' Simply put, if you draw enough, you're bound to get good at it.

    However, just any kind of drawing won't do. Practice hard, but also smart. Pick the things you know you're weak at. Not very good with the human muscles? Practice anatomy. Having trouble placing things? Practice perspective, and so on and so forth. The more you practice these various basic aspects of drawing, the more you build your visual library. And the more you build your visual library, the easier it becomes to draw from imagination.

    I guess that's it for now. Pretty basic, but hopefully it helped. Have a good time here!

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    To expand a bit on what Vritra said; it might be possible your drawings feel unnatural to you because you're drawing cartoons and manga figures? These in general tend to stylize or even warp completely basic elements such as perspective and proportions.
    It might be a good idea to have a go at still lifes or anatomical sketches if you want a more natural feel, since these subjects are more natural right off the bat. This also has the added advantage that if you make mistakes against, say, proportions, you'll much sooner pick up on it yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vritra View Post
    Monicax, firstly, welcome to the boards. CA is a wonderful place to begin -- as you put it -- 'the adventure with drawing'. I'm sure that if you stick around, and continue drawing, you'll eventually become as competent with art as you want to be.

    As for your current issue, I'm afraid that the answer lies in more drawing. You need to practice, not only from artworks from the internet, but also from real-life, and if necessary, photographs. Walt Stanchfield once said, 'We all have ten thousand bad drawings in us. The sooner we get them out the better.' Simply put, if you draw enough, you're bound to get good at it.

    However, just any kind of drawing won't do. Practice hard, but also smart. Pick the things you know you're weak at. Not very good with the human muscles? Practice anatomy. Having trouble placing things? Practice perspective, and so on and so forth. The more you practice these various basic aspects of drawing, the more you build your visual library. And the more you build your visual library, the easier it becomes to draw from imagination.

    I guess that's it for now. Pretty basic, but hopefully it helped. Have a good time here!

    Hi Vritra!

    Thank you for your comment. I'm happy that I fount this forum, it looks like a great place to finding help with whatever issues artistic you might have:-) I've kind of always wanted to draw but I've never could get round to it and for a couple of years I didn't even touch a pencil. But now I realized that drawing is something I want to do, something that I love to do and something that gives me so my pleasure while doing it! :-) I'm just starting and I'm not going to give up at the very beginning on the way.

    So far I found that the fastest way to find things I want to draw is on the Internet. But then, I found out that there's so many different styles of drawing, shadowing, etc. that I have no idea what to start with. I like manga and I thought that it would be the easiest thing to start drawing.

    How much time should I ideally spend drawing before I can visibly improve my drawings? Should I count in weeks, months or years?

    Thanks:-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbax View Post
    To expand a bit on what Vritra said; it might be possible your drawings feel unnatural to you because you're drawing cartoons and manga figures? These in general tend to stylize or even warp completely basic elements such as perspective and proportions.
    It might be a good idea to have a go at still lifes or anatomical sketches if you want a more natural feel, since these subjects are more natural right off the bat. This also has the added advantage that if you make mistakes against, say, proportions, you'll much sooner pick up on it yourself.

    Hi Gorbax!

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Actually, I like drawing manga and cartoons and I really thought that would be the easiest choice for the beginning. Isn't drawing from nature more difficult? Anyway, I would love to get really good at drawing, I'm not sure how much one can improve with time and a lot of practice. Eventually, I would like to be able to draw realistic drawings, that is my main goal... just doubt if I am capable of that. I have been searching on the Internet and found this website:
    http://www.rajacenna.com/

    Have you heard about this girl? She is only 18 and she's amazing at drawings! If only I could draw like her... oh! That makes me a bit disappointed at myself.

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