What lamp do you use for painting at night?
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    What lamp do you use for painting at night?

    What lamp do you use for painting at night? How do you feel about it? I just need to get some opinions about different types or brands of lamp from artists' perspective, and whether if it makes a big difference or not in your artwork that the lamp is expensive.

    I need recommendation of some cheap lamp, built for daylight or incandescent bulbs, that produces some decent or good lighting. I am leaning on getting a lamp that you can hang, or a lamp you can put on the ground that arches over the table of subjects, so it doesn't interfere with the subjects. I don't know of any good ones, except one of my past teachers recommended lamps by BlueMax:

    http://www.fullspectrumsolutions.com/

    I have bought a desk lamp there, but the replacement bulbs cost $30 for their finest bulbs and produces quite realistic daylight. With the lamp on and my room closed, the light coming through the crevices of the door looks like morning light. But I don't know if I should buy their daylight bulb or use a cheaper lamp with cheaper bulbs.

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    I painted at night in my garage for a couple years and just used "daylight" style flourescents over my painting area...balanced a bit by your typical warm incandescent. Worked fine for me. I prefer working under a little less illumination than many though. There is an interesting thing that occurs when working under somewhat dim light or light that is too strong....under dimmer conditions you compensate and your painting will have a bit more punch in color and value when displayed under average light. IF you work outside a lot, especially in full sun, you also compensate and your painting will look flat and dead under normal light. Just my two cents.

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    I use Lumichrome Full Spectrum
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/lu...rescent-lamps/

    The link has models that are 96 % of sunlight but they also make a 98%.
    These and the Phillips full spectrum TL950 are the best lamps out there. The reason to go with fluorescents are they are more efficient than other types of bulbs. If you get the four foot bulbs they will light up most normal rooms. I have a bank of 4 above my easel. You can get the housing at a Lowes or Home Depot for under 100 bucks. They are the kind of housing that hangs on a chain like in a garage and plugs into a wall or ceiling socket or you can wire it into the ceiling like I did.The lamps themselves are anywhere from 8 to 12 bucks a piece but last 20 to 30,000 hours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    I painted at night in my garage for a couple years and just used "daylight" style flourescents over my painting area...balanced a bit by your typical warm incandescent. Worked fine for me. I prefer working under a little less illumination than many though. There is an interesting thing that occurs when working under somewhat dim light or light that is too strong....under dimmer conditions you compensate and your painting will have a bit more punch in color and value when displayed under average light. IF you work outside a lot, especially in full sun, you also compensate and your painting will look flat and dead under normal light. Just my two cents.


    I have noticed that when I brought my watercolor plein air indoors. But I have been only using the daylight lamp for lighting my subject and using the light built into the room to light my canvas. This was a bad idea since the light built into my room would make the shadows look lighter than if there was one light source. I can't get both of my canvas and the subject lit at the same time with my lamp at the moment since its a desk lamp.

    Do you use the type of lamps that hang from somewhere, like a clip-on type? I would like one of those, but I can't prepare the exact terminology for such a lamp. Typing in lamp into amazon doesn't get the result.

    EDIT:


    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    I use Lumichrome Full Spectrum
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/lu...rescent-lamps/

    The link has models that are 96 % of sunlight but they also make a 98%.
    These and the Phillips full spectrum TL950 are the best lamps out there. The reason to go with fluorescents are they are more efficient than other types of bulbs. If you get the four foot bulbs they will light up most normal rooms. I have a bank of 4 above my easel. You can get the housing at a Lowes or Home Depot for under 100 bucks. They are the kind of housing that hangs on a chain like in a garage and plugs into a wall or ceiling socket or you can wire it into the ceiling like I did.The lamps themselves are anywhere from 8 to 12 bucks a piece but last 20 to 30,000 hours.

    I didn't see your post before I replied the above. Thanks for the info. This would solve the problem of the light in my room lighting the subject along with the lamp that is supposed to light the subject, which makes the shadows lighter than with just one light source. One of my classes use those long lightbulbs in sets, and they create multiple shadows on the subject; do you have this problem?

    Last edited by Vay; November 21st, 2012 at 09:44 PM.
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    I use two ott light lamps with daylight bulbs. One is clipped onto my easel (above the canvas) and the second one is clipped onto my palette table (above my paints). They seem to work well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vay View Post
    I didn't see your post before I replied the above. Thanks for the info. This would solve the problem of the light in my room lighting the subject along with the lamp that is supposed to light the subject, which makes the shadows lighter than with just one light source. One of my classes use those long lightbulbs in sets, and they create multiple shadows on the subject; do you have this problem?
    I misread your OP. I use thees to paint with in the studio but use separate lights for lighting the subjects when I do still lifes in the studio and I have to block the fluorescents with a large board so they don't bleed onto the scene. Give me a couple of minutes and I will shoot some pictures of how I do it.

    Okay Sorry,

    So I use a shadow box to control the light, it is basically a cardboard box with two sides cut off. Over that I put a cloth, the still life goes inside the box. and I have a lightstand with a metal skirt to control direction, the bulbs I use are 200, 300 or 600 watt, depending on the effect and brightness I want. To block most of the light from my easel I set up another easel with a large canvas draped with another cloth. this effectively blocks most of the light from my painting easel.

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    Last edited by dpaint; November 21st, 2012 at 10:24 PM.
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    Hey D! Where'd you get the shelves that the still life is sitting on?

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    Armand must have stashed away all the scattered bras before taking those shots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Star Eater View Post
    Armand must have stashed away all the scattered bras before taking those shots.
    And the empty wine bottles. What is with women hanging bras all over the house to dry? For every damn bra hanging in my house drying I want a topless woman walking around :-)

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    You know I share your sentiments on this. I sat on one last night that had been draped on the sofa.

    I just bought a new easel, God knows what I'm going to find dangling off it soon.

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    For a solid night rendering, I usually rely on a dead lightbulb; when I have to improvise, I use a live one and switch it off...

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    Hey D! Where'd you get the shelves that the still life is sitting on?
    I had them made for me about 20 years ago. They come apart and stack flat which is great for moving them. The shelves are on tracks and slide in and out.

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    I can't do a lot that in a five member family living in a small apartment. I am currently using up 30% of the small living room with all my stuff and what-not(my small room is filled with stacks of books so I can't paint there). One day I will move away and get my own place, one day. . .

    I also ordered the testrite light unit from your photo dpaint, hehe:

    http://www.wayfair.com/Testrite-Ligh...XX-TS1255.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    I had them made for me about 20 years ago. They come apart and stack flat which is great for moving them. The shelves are on tracks and slide in and out.
    Don't suppose you still have the plans?

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    theres a solid 300 joke to this question somewhere, "then we shall paint in the dark"?, I have an abysmal set up for this sort of thing...
    I ussually do digital at night for that very reason

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