SVA animation vs computer animation
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    SVA animation vs computer animation

    I've been considering the school of visual arts as a backup school to Ringling for next fall, and I've noticed that it offers both animation AND computer animation. What's the difference between the two programs, other than the obvious? Is one program better than the other, or is it just a matter of personal preference? Any info would be greatly appreciated.

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    I'd be curious to find this out myself. I am applying to ringling for GAD, yet after watching a few thesis films from SVAs computer arts program, it did seem like some really decent animation work- some of the films looking like cinematic for games.
    I'm not sure, but I think that SVA has a bit of a visual arts edge over ringling, whereas ringling has arguably the best animation reputation on the east coast. The videos I've seen of SVA seem to have much more work with special effects style images, whereas ringling seems to much more focus on the exaggerated motions and acting you see in pixar style movies.

    I could be very wrong, but this is what I'm observing. As far as SVA's CA versus animation, that IDK. maybe animation is more a general animation course using 2-d claymation, stop motion, etc, while their CA is focused on computer based programs such as flash and maya?

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    Short answer: Animation is more character and narrative, Computer Animation is more technical and VFX.
    Long answer: contact the admissions office and ask. That's their job.


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    I'm currently a student at SVA majoring in 2d animation. The difference between the two is that 2d is the traditional cartoons that are drawn by hand (either on paper or digitally in Flash) and that 3d is done all on computers with Maya to create 3d models (like Pixar movies). So basically it really depends on if you have an interest or have skills in one or the other. Based on my portfolio they said 2d animation would be better for me. There also is a stop-motion animation program, but you have to complete 1 year in 2d animation before you can transfer to it.

    And no offence, but I've never heard of Ringling... and when I was applying for schools my brother, who works for Cartoon Network, told me that CalArts and SVA were the best schools for animation.

    but anyways, for this first semester as a 2d animation student at SVA my classes were pretty good and I've definitely seen great improvement in my figure drawing. The courses that I took were: Intro to Animation, Animation History, Drawing (focused on quick figure drawing), Story Pitch (script writing and storyboarding), and English (thankfully the only academic class you have to take the semester.)

    But mainly, this school is well known among professionals and studios, so there's a bunch of internships that are easy to get and you're pretty much guaranteed a job when you finish. Plus, you're in the middle of NYC...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mlelash View Post
    Based on my portfolio they said 2d animation would be better for me. There also is a stop-motion animation program, but you have to complete 1 year in 2d animation before you can transfer to it.

    And no offence, but I've never heard of Ringling... and when I was applying for schools my brother, who works for Cartoon Network, told me that CalArts and SVA were the best schools for animation.


    But mainly, this school is well known among professionals and studios, so there's a bunch of internships that are easy to get and you're pretty much guaranteed a job when you finish. Plus, you're in the middle of NYC...
    Let me rephrase my earlier statement,
    "ringling has arguably the best 3D animation reputation on the east coast"

    Ringling is a college located in Sarasota Florida (right below Tampa) and it's CA program supposedly one where a lot of big named studios go to hire. With that said, their CA program, after the first year, or maybe two, becomes entirely 3-d based, so if 2-d is your thing, Ringling wouldn't really be where you'd want to go.

    I think that the top US animation schools are in fact Ringling, CalArts, and SVA, in no particular order. These are followed (from my understanding) by schools like RISD and SCAD, and I mean no offense to anyone going to any of these schools- this is just how I understand the rankings. Graduating from any of them is an achievement in itself from what I understand.

    What I've gathered about Ringling, is that though SVA and CalArts are in better locations, students who get themselves out there, have no trouble getting internships, though I'd imagine a lot more travel would be involved.

    With all of that said;
    Mlelash, When you go onto the SVA.edu webpage and look up graduate programs, there is the animation program and the Computer Art, Computer Animation & Visual Effects program. Are you saying that within the animation program there is a specialization based towards 2-d or 3-d or are you calling the animation program 2-d and the computer art... 3-d?
    Eventually, because I love learning, I may very well pursue a graduate degree (possibly even professional), and I may choose to do so in SVA. I ask to try to get an understanding of how the school works, so that years down the line, I might be prepared.

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    Each school has its own culture and strength and weakness. You need to understand this. Ringling, for example, is well known for its 3d animation program, while CalArts is very well known for its traditional 2d animation program. Although USC has a well known Cinematic School and animation program , much of their emphasis seems very 2d oriented. SVA and Pratt have both programs and is well known in the NY area, although Pratt tends to be more "fine art and experimental" oriented while SVA is more practical and commercially oriented. SCAD is also becoming well known for animation. I think they, like SVA, have both programs, but I am not as familiar with SCAD's offerings. RIT is a rising school in both 2d and 3d animation and has a very practical curriculum. However, they are a relatively new program and don't have the same amount of connections as the other schools mentioned. This may change though in the future.

    Last edited by Taxguy; January 23rd, 2013 at 03:45 PM.
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    should have read this forum earlier..

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    Quote Originally Posted by judyrd47 View Post
    should have read this forum earlier..
    Why? what happened?

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