Keeping life in perspective
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Thread: Keeping life in perspective

  1. #1
    HunterKiller_'s Avatar
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    Keeping life in perspective

    "The creative industry operates largely by holding ‘creative’ people ransom to their own self-image, precarious sense of self-worth, and fragile – if occasionally out of control ego. We tend to set ourselves impossibly high standards, and are invariably our own toughest critics."

    "You don’t have to drive creative folk like most workers. They drive themselves. Just wind ‘em up and let ‘em go."

    "Truly creative people tend not to be motivated by money. That’s why so few of us have any."

    http://www.lindsredding.com/2012/03/...n-perspective/

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    Point being?

    What would Caravaggio do?
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    Point being that there's more to life than work, that having self-respect is good, that you shouldn't let other abuse your passion, that we're craftsman - not sweatshop monkeys, that whatever you're working on probably isn't worth compromising your health or taking time away from your loved ones.

    That's what I got out of it.

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    Ahh!

    Curse this creative soul. . . how shall I live with it. .



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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Point being?
    Read the whole thing. Then, to fill in some blanks and add some context, read this. And finally, this.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Hmmm, I expected another perspective drawing thread here. I cannot even tell whether I'm disappointed, really...

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    Hmmm....well, yeah. Don't really have much of a response...a lot of thoughts and vague feelings but not easy to put down here. But I will share the core that most of these thoughts seem to revolve around...well duh? (And I don't mean that to sound disrespectful, Linds seemed like a really straight talking person so I feel he would appreciate the same).

    My point being that those realities seem self-evident to me? Not that I'm some kind of wise, all-aware person, but I've asked myself many of the same questions in my career and made conscious decisions to do what I felt was best for myself and my family. I actually began down the advertising path, had a knack for it, decided I didn't want to sell crap...which led me to a degree in graphic design, which I had a knack for, but decided I didn't want to be doing logos to sell crap. Went into video game design which at the time was fairly pleasant...sure you worked for a company but damn you had tremendous independence...but had to earn that by busting ass occasionally as well. Eventually that did not jive with my growing family and I took a stand...because I didn't want to make crap. Long story short I've always been fiercely independent and based decisions on what I feel is right in any situation. Sure, compromise is part of most equations...sometimes that is the right decision, but so is having integrity.

    Anyway, interesting insights and some of it rings true, and some of it makes me think "What took you so long?".

    One last thought...much of that applies universally, not just to creatives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HunterKiller_ View Post
    Point being that there's more to life than work, that having self-respect is good, that you shouldn't let other abuse your passion, that we're craftsman - not sweatshop monkeys, that whatever you're working on probably isn't worth compromising your health or taking time away from your loved ones.

    That's what I got out of it.
    What is the point of saving yourself? For what? So you can grow old and regret not living up to your potential? Rats breed, no big deal there. If people love you they support you being what you are. I love to see my partner working at what she loves. I never understood people telling people they supposedly love that they work too hard or too much. That's not love, that is jealousy and insecurity.

    My art isn't work, its what I do and its who I am. If you or anybody else isn't like this that is fine but I am like this and everything else in my life is secondary to painting and drawing. Anything in my life that gets in the way of my art gets removed by me. Family, friends, relationships, jobs, nothing matters as much as my art. I don't care if people like my work or not or think its very good or not. Doesn't concern me. I do like making money though and I like making money because it is a sign of respect for what I do. Nothing pleases me more than painting something that I sell to a collector. That is respect for me and my ability.

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    Armand, I think you are a good example of something: Working very very hard for yourself is not the same as working very very hard for someone else. Because in the end, you are the one who benefits from your hard work, not some corporation that's not going to think twice about letting you go if they have to save money. I have seen people work their arses off 70 hours a week and not seeing their small children for months while working on video games that never even got published. I have seen it enough time enough times to see the value in Mr.Redding's text.

    Of course many artists have jobs and being an employed artist means being an artist with health insurance and benefits (something very important in the united-states and weird to every one else.) But being an employed artist also means that working very hard will not always make you into a better artist because you will work on stuff that's irrelevant to you, it will not always reflect on your status in the company, and it might not contribute to your being happier later in life because you spent 4 months straight finishing an ad campaign for yeast infection cream or porting a crappy game to a crappy tablet no one's ever gonna use instead of spending time with your loved ones.

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    Hmmm...good observation Qitsune about working for yourself...I always felt I worked for myself as well, which was what I was getting at about being independent. I saw, and experienced the 70+ hour work weeks, living in a conference room thing as well...but back then we had some major benefits and rewards built in to the system: profit sharing, kick-back time, expense paid vacation trips for us and our spouses, etc.

    At some point who is to blame for the crap conditions? Those that allow themselves to be abused in such a fashion? That is the real question. Again my respeonse to Lind's article is "why?" Why would you put up with that?

    Or perhaps the problem is simply one of supply and demand? The idea that there is a line of talented young folk behind you willing to do your job for nothing. I believe that is a myth, but sadly that pressure drives many to compromise their values and integrity.

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    Q,

    I work for other people, but I don't let other people abuse me. I don't hire out as a wrist, my brain comes attached with my ability. I've worked 18 hour days for 45 days in a row without a day off. Slept at work and actually had someone leave me over working too much. It was my choice though, I believed in the project and the company at the time. I'm still proud of those projects. She didn't have a career or a passion for anything and floundered from one meaningless job to the next, she was a coward who would never care enough to put everything on the line for what she loved, she always played it safe and was just waiting around to get knocked up so she could divorce well and dabble the rest of her life. Which is exactly what she did after me. Not that this is a gender thing because I've seen men do the same thing. If you want a family have one and prioritize them or not, but don't whine about making bad choices.

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