Advice for a beginner.
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    Advice for a beginner.

    Hi everyone,
    One year ago, I enrolled with one of the biggest online schools/databases.
    During this period, I've tried lots of different paths and have finally understood that Matte Painting and Digital Environment is the right path for me and I would like to enter the film sector.
    At the moment, I have basic knowledge of modeling and texturing in Maya, Mudbox, Zbrush, Mari, Houdini, AE and Nuke; a better knowledge of Photoshop and Vue; and advanced knowledge of photography and photographic composition.

    I've read and written a lot of posts in different forums but I still have some doubts:
    *Maya is the film industry standard and the most useful for finding a high-level job. On the other hand Cinema 4D is easier to learn and has an in-built Camera Projection tool.
    I've also read that it is becoming more and more popular in the film industry and some of the biggest names in Matte painting use it.
    My question is: would it be better to stick with Maya on switch to/add cinema 4D to my portfolio? Or another 3D package?
    If you tell me to stick with Maya, how can I overcome its lack of Camera Projection tool?
    *My idea would be to learn Photoshop, Maya/C4D, ZBrush/MudBox, Vue and Nuke, is it right?
    *Please could you tell me which essential techniques I will need to master in Photoshop, Maya/C4D, Mudbox/ZBrush, VUE and Nuke in order to get a job as a matte painter and digital environment?
    *As I want to enter into films, some people have advised me to learn Mari. What do you think about this?
    *In your opinion, would it be useful for me to understand perspective and learn free hand drawing?

    Any additional information, pointer or advice that you can give me would be greatly appreciates.
    Thank you so much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanonVFX View Post
    Hi everyone,
    One year ago, I enrolled with one of the biggest online schools/databases.
    During this period, I've tried lots of different paths and have finally understood that Matte Painting and Digital Environment is the right path for me and I would like to enter the film sector.
    At the moment, I have basic knowledge of modeling and texturing in Maya, Mudbox, Zbrush, Mari, Houdini, AE and Nuke; a better knowledge of Photoshop and Vue; and advanced knowledge of photography and photographic composition.

    I've read and written a lot of posts in different forums but I still have some doubts:
    *Maya is the film industry standard and the most useful for finding a high-level job. On the other hand Cinema 4D is easier to learn and has an in-built Camera Projection tool.
    I've also read that it is becoming more and more popular in the film industry and some of the biggest names in Matte painting use it.
    My question is: would it be better to stick with Maya on switch to/add cinema 4D to my portfolio? Or another 3D package?
    If you tell me to stick with Maya, how can I overcome its lack of Camera Projection tool?
    *My idea would be to learn Photoshop, Maya/C4D, ZBrush/MudBox, Vue and Nuke, is it right?
    *Please could you tell me which essential techniques I will need to master in Photoshop, Maya/C4D, Mudbox/ZBrush, VUE and Nuke in order to get a job as a matte painter and digital environment?
    *As I want to enter into films, some people have advised me to learn Mari. What do you think about this?
    *In your opinion, would it be useful for me to understand perspective and learn free hand drawing?

    Any additional information, pointer or advice that you can give me would be greatly appreciates.
    Thank you so much.
    ....why would you model a matte painting in maya? Is this a thing? Aren't matte paintings...painted?

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    I'm also a bit confused about that, but he did say "matte painting and digital environment", and for sure 3D modeling is used a lot for creating effects and environments in films. They are different things, though, and I would advise you to pick one - either concentrate on 3D (environment modeling) or 2D (matte painting). Certainly it's no bad thing for a matte painter to have 3D skills and vice versa, but in general they require different skillsets. This isn't to say you can't do both, but you will want to start with just one in order to create a strong and focused portfolio to seek work. Though they may give a nod to your range of knowledge, a company looking for a matte painter isn't going to be much interested in looking at a portfolio of environment models.

    Your direction will also affect the software and techniques you need. f you are going to be working primarily with 2D and matte painting you definitely need to study perspective, colour theory, and drawing and painting ability. If you are going to be working primarily with 3D environment construction those things aren't as important, and you will want to concentrate on learning software like Maya to a high standard, plus 2D texture creation. "Which software package" is difficult because you can't get around the fact that different studios will use different ones. However, which you pick is less important to employers than your level of flexibility. Having learned one you will find that it is then easier to adapt to different packages in the future, but don't try to learn multiple 3D packages at the same time. Just remember that you will probably need to be flexible and willing to use others in the future.

    Hope this helps a bit.

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    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    As Alice says you need to learn to draw and paint before you worry about modeling if you want to be a matte painter. Any successful matte painter in the industry understands light, color and perspective and can render in 2d. You need to study the history of matte painting and how it is done because right now it sounds like you have no clue about it.

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    Matte paintings are primarily digital now Alice. But what dpaint says it true as well. To me it sounds like you have done some homework and are aware of the industry tools so that's good. If prople are migrating to C4D then work with that...if Maya is important then know it too. If you're into matte/environment work I don't see Zbrush/Mudbox being anything more than a distraction...unless used for creating architectural detailing.

    Of course you need to understand perspective...and drawing...but focused on environment and architecture.

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    Learning to see

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