Becoming a Concept Artist
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    Becoming a Concept Artist

    Hello everybody.

    I'm stuck in a tricky situation.
    I am a sophomore in college, no declared major,
    and only really started practicing art my senior year of high school.
    Before I just thought it was a skill people were born with.


    Anyhow, I've been practicing my drawing more this past year, along with digital painting. I would like a career in concept art,
    but now I am sort of stuck. I can't get in to art school. I do not yet have a portfolio to show, and am not yet that good. If I get a degree in something else it will just take away time from practicing art, which I really want to spend time doing now since I have so much catching up to do.

    Does anybody have any advice?

    Thanks,

    Benjamin

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    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Either do it or don't...but stop worrying about it. Don't wish...don't fret, start off with regrets, etc. Figure out what you want and go after it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DreamArt View Post
    Hello everybody.

    I'm stuck in a tricky situation.
    I am a sophomore in college, no declared major,
    and only really started practicing art my senior year of high school.
    Before I just thought it was a skill people were born with.


    Anyhow, I've been practicing my drawing more this past year, along with digital painting. I would like a career in concept art,
    but now I am sort of stuck. I can't get in to art school. I do not yet have a portfolio to show, and am not yet that good. If I get a degree in something else it will just take away time from practicing art, which I really want to spend time doing now since I have so much catching up to do.

    Does anybody have any advice?

    Thanks,

    Benjamin
    Listen to Brad Rigney's story on Dave Rapoza's channel. Take notes, and get to work.



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    Wow! Part way through the interview,
    nice.
    Really makes me want to get to work.

    Thanks guys.

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    How to catch up:

    You can get a degree in something else and still have time to make art. Stop playing video games or watching kittens and puppies on Youtube. You can go get a degree in art, but that doesn't guarantee you anything if you slack off.

    At most, getting a degree other than in art forces you to do more things. After having spent hours doing school work, you will start to get a sense of how valuable time is, and you will want to start drawing already. I know I have. I want to draw every time after knowing that part of my days are devoted purely to doing non-art homework, daily. This method only works if you get a degree in something other than art, but at the same time is a subject you are passionate about.

    Most of the time people slack off because they are given too much time. I have slacked off a lot of times in summer when there was no school. It is until school began, then I realized how little time I have, so I worked harder.

    Once you begin to slack off for one day, you will begin to feel your laziness. After several days, you can't help but procrastinate all of the time; you get spoiled from previous procrastinations. Procrastination is the rewarding of yourself for doing things that tend to reward instantaneously, such as watching T.V. or playing video games; the brain releases dopamine anytime you reward yourself. Your brain grows tolerant to new levels of dopamine, and so the next day, you might have a tendency to procrastinate even more to get the same "high"; thus it's a downward slope for procrastination. So limit yourself to one video of puppies per day.

    One of the most important life lessons for me is coming to understand how important time is. Close to death encounter helps. If you have ever been hospitalized for anything, you might have laid there thinking about the time wasted on the hospital bed and how it could have been better used. When you're young, you feel like you can live forever, but that will change; time stops for no one.

    Another important thing to keep in mind, everyday, is a goal. You tend to work harder if you have a goal because you will know the general direction you want to head, so it is easier to get started in general. By a goal, I mean a dream, or something you want to make out of your one life; don't procrastinate it away, life is rare in the universe.

    Last edited by Vay; November 13th, 2012 at 07:48 PM.
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    Actually I have been thinking recently about how little time I've spent being productive.
    I've stopped with the games, but do spend a fair bit of time with videos and looking at other people's art, (the second tends to be quite deceptive as it isn't nearly as productive as a study but FEELS as if it is helping me improve.

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    Awesome interview Thank You so much for posting!!!!!!!

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    I don't know much about colleges in the US, but is there a reason you have to do this right now? My advice would be to take a year out, work part-time and spend the rest of your time studying art and creating a portfolio which you can use to get into an art school or onto an art degree. In the UK it's quite common for people to delay their degree for a while if they aren't ready to do it yet, and if you think an art degree is the best choice for you, that seems the most reasonable option to me.

    Alternatively many great concept artists are self-taught, so art school isn't a must. I would think very carefully about the consideration of studying a different full-time course and working part-time on your art though - I am sure some people would be able to manage it, but success would depend on several factors, such as whether you also need to work to support yourself, the difficulty level and time commitment of the degree you are doing, what kind of organisational and motivational skills you have, how many other hobbies and responsibilities you have, how much time you spend socially, etc. I can honestly say I wouldn't be able to do it, I found a full time degree a challenging thing to manage all by itself! You will have to think about your own personality and if that's something that seems reasonable.

    Try to relax about it. Plenty of very successful artists don't get into the industry until they are older, so there's no need to worry about beginning art a little later than some people - plenty of professionals became serious about art at a much later age than that.

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