Art: Question regarding Sculpey
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Thread: Question regarding Sculpey

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Question regarding Sculpey

    Hi all! Been lurking a while but have buckets of questions to ask so thought I'd better start. ^_^

    I'm really interested in having a go at sculpture since every time I bake a cake for the kids, I always have to play about with sugarpaste and make little figures to go with it. May sound weird but I'd love to make something a lot more durable so have been looking into what to sculpt with.

    I don't have access to a kiln so clay is out, so polymer clay popped it's head up. I've used Fimo before but really couldn't get along with it and I'm now considering Sculpey. My question is this: which is better to use, Sculpey Premo or Super Sculpey?

    I'm aiming for large(ish) sculptures so I'm also looking into what size armature wire to use too. Any help you guys can give me would be awesome because ultimately, I want to be able to sculpt something like the pic below (and yes, I know it's going to be a long time and a sh*tload of practice before I get there).

    Name:  337-St.-George-and-the-Dragon-q75-395x500.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Isn't that a picture of my beloved Sant Jordi (for us Catalans) or Saint George?

    In any case I'd strongly recommend SuperSculpey, which is what I usually work with and which gives me as good results as I would expect from a modelling clay. It's reeeeeally useful since you can bake it as many times as you want (meaning you can go bit by bit, baking it after a specially delicate or impotant part) and it's very reliable, giving you a huge amount of detail.

    I'd recommend you use the medium size wire which is like an average small electric wire (pc mouse, headphones...) and divide the figure into three separated parts, one for each character.

    I have done some works though I don't think they are very good yet. Just take a look around and serve yourself with questions and tutorials. Good Luck!

    Pol Banti

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    Super sculpy!
    I usually start with coat hanger wire bolted to a board. then add newspaper and/or foil and wrap it with duct tape to bulk out the bodies, then coat it with a 1/4" of sculpy.
    buy the book "popsculpture" on amazon. It will answer tons of questions!

    Maybe something like this? I'd do the dragon first, then the horse, then make the rider completely separate until he's right.

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    I always go about building my armatures with aluminium wire in different thickness depending of size of the sculpt, from 1mm to 3mm and then bind floral wire around them back and forth to create a cross pattern over the armature. Sculpey won't stick on its own so it needs something to hold on to.
    Very important to have in mind, sculpey is relatively heavy and anything thicker than a pair of centimeters or an inch should be bulked up with for example; aluminium foil. Also too thick pieces of sculpey are at risk of not getting baked properly which may cause cracking.

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