Art: Do I need drawing skills to study animation?
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    Do I need drawing skills to study animation?

    I have a main interest in film editing and visuals in general but lately Ive been considering animation. Thing is Ive only taken a couple of drawing classes in college, and Im hoping that I have enough skills to have me be a good animation student. The classes I've taken werent demanding, somehow even though I lacked drawing & art skills I still was able to be top of my class. Teachers seem to think I stand out, but I know my art is both bad and frustrating. I understand some fundementals to pencil drawing, but I can't say that I'm particularly good at it at all. I want to know if I need said skills and if I do then why since animation isnt concept art?

    On a relevant matter, is it okay to do 2 year degree in animation school? Its kinda costly but i know if somehow I could be good at it, it would be worth it. I just dont want to make a mistake.

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    Drawing is always a plus because - composition, lights etc. also apply to animation. But I think the best about drawing for animator is gesture and anatomy cause it will help you pose your characters and understand how things move. Also, concept art is part of animation and it's always a great thing to understand things related to your profession.

    And about schools, I don't know. But I think http://conceptart.org/forums/showthr...considering-it always applies

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    Can I "learn" drawing fundemtals whilst I learn animation? Or does one need to precede the other? I dont want to feel like im handicapped by this in the future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by logitex View Post
    Can I "learn" drawing fundemtals whilst I learn animation? Or does one need to precede the other? I dont want to feel like im handicapped by this in the future.
    I think learning both at the same time is a great way to do it. You will not only notice that drawing makes you better at animation but also that animating makes you better at drawing.

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    It is important but its not that if you don't know how to sketch you cant be a good animation artist
    just try to sketch more and more and you will be an exoert in it..But for animation its just a plus point

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    You should check the John K's blog, peruse the posts and you will find out what it takes to be a good animator.
    http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com
    I think everyone can learn to be a decent draughstsman by simple observation and busting of his own ass by sitting and practising.
    If you really like it, go for it.

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    Drawing is always helpful because it shows that you can see the world around you. depending on the route you want to take it could be very important or it could be an after thought.

    if you study strictly 3-d animation in a sort of trade program, you may not need to know how to draw, because you will focus only on how to make a character move, and look alive; often you work on pre-made riggs and models, and only focus on animating it/ making it appear to act.

    If you study 2-d animation, you will need to know how to draw because there is no animation without thousands of drawings. 2-d requires a lot of drawing.

    If you study a full 3-d program, you will need to draw. a good computer animation program teaches you a foundation in drawing, 2-d, and even modeling and rigging. this allows you more options once you graduate.

    many schools will not accept you without a portfolio, so when looking up schools look to see what they ask for and what level of drawing ability you will be expected to have.
    Since you are looking at short time schooling for animation, maybe look at animation mentor. it's a year and a half long, and many people seem to say good things about it. It's more trade based and may not need much drawing potential.

    If you are looking into going into a 4 year school, they often expect you to come through the door with at least a basic skill set. they want to see that you can draw what you see, and that you can understand the human body, and the body in motion.
    4 year schools teach you from the ground up, and the best schools seem to teach as much as they can in those 4 years.
    usually the first year is called the foundation year. this year focuses on figure drawing, color, design, and concepts.

    from there things tend to develop rapidly. good schools teach you traditional animation, as well as what ever specialization you may be focusing on. some schools go more of an experimental route, with clay-mation and mixed media, while others focus solely on 2-d or 3-d. 2-d seems to focus on timing, motion, and film dynamics. there is a long history in 2-d and a lot of information to gain, but with the rapidly growing 3-d industry many of those programs seem to be becoming foundation classes.
    3-d has to go through a gamut. The good schools won't teach you to the software, as that is regularly changing, but they will instead try to teach you a foundation that you can use to work in any program. many schools teach you lighting, rigging, molding, concept design, story boarding, production, development, and of course animation.

    if you just want animation- I'd say definitely look into animation mentor, as that is what it focuses on; but that's it. you are trained to be an animator, but nothing else. a four year school, will teach you more, but it takes a lot longer, and it costs a lot more.

    if you want to learn to draw (and why not), just start drawing what you see. all the time. Draw on the bus, drinking coffee, sitting down, standing up. just draw and draw and draw. then paint. but focus on what you see. drawing observationally is the best way to learn. and remember if you do decide you want to draw; draw what you see; not what you think. all drawing is is having the ability to see.

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    To be submitted to an art school you probably need to show some basic drawing skills.
    And while you're at the art school you probably have to make a few hand drawn animations and follow life model classes. (lots of fun!)

    But you don't need drawing skills to become a good 3D animator. I personally know quite a few 3D animators that never draw in their spare time and are marvelous at animation.
    If you know how to draw, then your preproduction phase becomes a lot stronger (concept art, model sheet, storyboard) and you become more complete, but it doesn't really affect your sense of movement or acting out your characters.

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    As what many people said up above, Drawing is always a great asset to your artistic skill set! Now reading your first post you sound more like a MOTION DESIGNER not an animator. You should look up stuff about motion design. Motion design examples include Iron Man graphics, Tron graphics, film intros like in the new Sherlock Holmes, visual graphics in any movie or commercial, typography motion.

    Motion Design is combining computer animation and graphic design. Motion designers use programs like After Effects, C4D, Zbrush, Nuke. Traditional Animation (ie renaissance Disney) or Digital Animation (ie Pixar) are more cartoon based and focuses on character building using programs like Maya. Motion Design is NOT cartoon based. It's not based on those quirky fun characters.

    I'm talking a lot about Motion Design vs 3D/2D Animation. I'm saying this because Motion design doesn't draw that much. If you want to study 3D/2D animation you need to eat, breathe, live drawing at every moment. I have a ton of 2D/3D animation friends and if you can't draw you're doomed to fail. Motion doesn't require much drawing. It helps a lot to know drawing and it's a great asset. But I know some fantastic motion designers who can't draw.

    Food for thought! You should look into what specific place of animation you want to learn :]

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