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Thread: RBA Sketchbook

  1. #755
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    Thanks Mrkolsyrad and Buxu!

    Surus: For the benefit of others reading this thread I'll reply in english if you don't mind. Surus is asking about resources for the construction of the human face.

    There are multiple different constructional approaches to this (and probably many more than those I'm listing here).

    The most basic one is Loomis' method (ball with sides cut off). Have a look at Loomis "Drawing the head and hands" and at Stan Prokopenkos YT Channel- Stan explains that method very well. Loomis also has a planar model, but personally I don't like his planes very much. A bit confusing.

    Another version is Bridgman's planar construction of the human face. You can find that in "Constructive anatomy". Personally I don't find Bridgmans facial construction very useful, that the books are badly edited also doesn't help.

    Then there's the Reilly abstraction. That's what I use for my initial constructions. There is no book on it that I know of, all of the stuff you'll have to look for online. The Reilly abstractions isn't a planar model (although it can describe planes) but a rhythmical abstraction of the face, connecting muscles, bone and fat. It's taught at Watts atelier. Ron Lemen explains and demonstrated it on his GNOMON DVDs about the male portrait.

    As I said, that's what I use for my initial lay-in. After that I use knowledge that I draw from my asaro-head studies. You can get the Asaro head from planesofthehead.com. With shipping to Europe it's about 120 USD and worth every penny.

    Hope that helps!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Thanks Mrkolsyrad and Buxu!

    Suru: For the benfit of others reading this thread I'll reply in english if you don't mind. Suru is asking about resources for the construction of the human face.

    There are multiple different constructional approaches to this (and probably many more than those I'm listing here).

    The most basic one is Loomis' method (ball with sides cut off). Have a look at Loomis "Drawing the head and hands" and at Stan Prokopenkos YT Channel- Stan explains that method very well. Loomis also has a planar model, but personally I don't like his planes very much. A bit confusing.

    Another version is Bridgman's planar construction of the human face. You can find that in "Constructive anatomy". Personally I don't find Bridgmans facial construction very useful, that the books are badly edited also doesn't help.

    Then there's the Reilly abstraction. That's what I use for my initial constructions. There is no book on it that I know of, all of the stuff you'll have to look for online. The Reilly abstractions isn't a planar model (although it can describe planes) but a rhythmical abstraction of the face, connecting muscles, bone and fat. It's taught at Watts atelier. Ron Lemen explains and demonstrated it on his GNOMON DVDs about the male portrait.

    As I said, that's what I use for my initial lay-in. After that I use knowledge that I draw from my asaro-head studies. You can get the Asaro head from planesofthehead.com. With shipping to Europe it's about 120 USD and worth every penny.

    Hope that helps!
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  3. #756
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    There is a book covering the Reilly method for heads and figures, written by Jack Faragasso, one of his students who went on to teach his methods for many years. The book is called Mastering Drawing the Human Figure. His head abstractions start out the same as the Fred Fixler version I've seen, but go much farther, to the point that they become confusing, with too many lines all over the place. But he does show step by step how he creates them, so it's good for that. But I'd make sure to also study the Fred Fixler version, which can be found on his site: Fred Fixler His version is much simpler and makes more sense, and it seems to be the one you're using Rene.
    "Figure drawing prepares you for painting at a high level" - Jeff Watts

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  5. #757
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  6. #758
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    A little warning - it can be a frustrating book in ways. Faragasso is what I'd call a very dogmatic teacher, and I don't think he's very good at explaining things - but then again, it's the Reilly method - there aren't many resources for that around, so I'll take it frustrating or not!
    "Figure drawing prepares you for painting at a high level" - Jeff Watts

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  7. #759
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    Also, one can never have enough art books

    Alright, some of the really crappy ones I bought when I was a teenager I could do without. But I like collecting proper instructional books. Bridgman, Bammes, Loomis, Hampton... they're all here =)
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  8. #760
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    skull looks gorgeous. Love the saturated oranges
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  9. #761
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    thanks whirly!

    Sorry for the prolonged absence. Been busy with work and no internet access for the last days. Driving me mad Sitting in an internet cafe right now. Here's a random portrait study with a few more steps and a bit of text to go with the steps since many requested this sort of thing.


    RBA Sketchbook

    - - - Updated - - -

    thanks whirly!

    Sorry for the prolonged absence. Been busy with work and no internet access for the last days. Driving me mad Sitting in an internet cafe right now. Here's a random portrait study with a few more steps and a bit of text to go with the steps since many requested this sort of thing.


    RBA Sketchbook
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  11. #762
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    Fantastic tutorial. Definitely going to refer back to it when I'm do heads again. Don't suppose you can give an idea of how you know which edges to lose. I tried it with a recent figure study and couldn't work out whether I was making things better or worse!

    Also do you see any problem is doing all the shadow mapping with hard edges first to get the shapes right and then modelling the form by selection which edges to make soft afterwards (or doing the reverse of this for that matter).
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  12. #763
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    A fantastic tutorial indeed. I'm doing constructional studies at the moment so this one is added to my resources. Thanks!
    Sketchbook .....critique appreciated
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  13. #764
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    thx alot T.T
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  14. #765
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    you're very welcome everyone! Glad this helps.

    whirly: You need to design your edges. Don't just randomly use a hard or a soft edge, arrange them. Personally I tend to use hard edges where there is bone close to the surface (zygomatic arch, chin etc.) and soft edges where there's more fat (cheeks, area benath the jaw etc.) but these are not rules set in stone. Look at masters of edge control (Sargent, zorn etc.) and try to analyze their edge work. Stapleton Kearns has an excellent series of blog posts about edge work: Stapleton Kearns: Edges in a Sargent

    Hope that helps!


    nothing much to show this time I'm afraid, just a random portrait study. i realized halfway through that I had already done a study from the same ref but decided to finish it anyways- there's enough to learn in a portrait for 4 or 5 studies:

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  15. #766
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    hm thx alot again. the link about edges was very interesting

    as feedback, isnt the hard edge on the hair distracting too much? as you are going for edges i would say that maybe this painting would benefit a bit from that, well not sure what you were after so not sure.
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  16. #767
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    Oh yeah, absolutely! I wasn't particularily concentrating on edgework on that one (just a random study to chill out) and the already over-sharp edge got ultra crisp when i sharpened the whole image after sizing it down


    RBA Sketchbook

    RBA Sketchbook

    - - - Updated - - -

    Oh yeah, absolutely! I wasn't particularily concentrating on edgework on that one (just a random study to chill out) and the already over-sharp edge got ultra crisp when i sharpened the whole image after sizing it down


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