How do you flip an object in perspective?
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    How do you flip an object in perspective?

    (not sure if right thread) I've a question regarding perspective. Have googled different phrases which I thought may help, but found nothing so far :0
    Umm, how do you go about doing something like the example below by Feng Zhu in his perspective video? It boggles my mind just thinking about it @_@

    He drew the front view of the aircraft, and then proceeded to draw the back view with all the perspective lines .3.
    Name:  FengZhuDEMO.jpg
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    Well, you do the same thing as you did before but only viewed from the back this time.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

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    Uhm yeah...you just do it? It just takes some experience sketching out basic form in perspective. Those sketches actually have some very minor discrepancies...but it doesn't matter at all since they clearly communicate the design (just making that point so you don't think it is somehow a super technical, 100% accurate drawing).

    What would Caravaggio do?
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    Use a plan view and then draw it from any angle you want in perspective. A plan view is top, side, front and back views
    here is an example of the steps
    http://www.automotiveillustrations.c...raw-a-car.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Uhm yeah...you just do it? It just takes some experience sketching out basic form in perspective. Those sketches actually have some very minor discrepancies...but it doesn't matter at all since they clearly communicate the design (just making that point so you don't think it is somehow a super technical, 100% accurate drawing).
    hmmm, basic foorm... I'll try to eyeball the measurements, but say I were doing a super technical piece for a portfolio, would there be some sort of vanishing point/perspective trick/extending of lines to get the proportions and scale relationships all right? .0.
    Nonetheless, I'm going to practice sketching some basic forms front and back for now

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Use a plan view and then draw it from any angle you want in perspective. A plan view is top, side, front and back views
    here is an example of the steps
    http://www.automotiveillustrations.c...raw-a-car.html
    Thanks, this looks like how I gotta do it, very useful

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    I'm afraid there are no tricks, if you find this mind boggling, then keep working on perspective until it comes naturally.
    Drawing the back is exactly like drawing the front, the only difference is that you draw the back instead of the front.

    Grinnikend door het leven...
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    dpaints right do the plan and side views and then distort them into perspective and use vanishing points and lines to figure out positions of major shapes.



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    Hey guys, I'm back with a theory I tested :0 It's kind of sloppy and hard to make out, but basically:
    1) I drew a rectangle [top one] with two different bands to test if the final product will have the right scaling
    2) Then I drew where I wanted the final position of the rectangle (in this case, toppled over to the left)
    3) Extended lines out at the vertices(?) of the original one, contained the area in Red and drew a diagonal, then extended vertical lines down from where the diagonal touches the points
    Name:  TestingPerspective.jpg
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    Did one or two tests so not sure if right yet, but what do you think?
    To reverse the bands, draw the diagonal in the opposite direction

    New question: How do I reverse the bands when the object is in the same position?

    Last edited by Raymond Luk; November 4th, 2012 at 08:04 PM.
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    Some of that works...but most doesn't. It's also a bit complex and misses some understanding of basic perspective fundamentals. I'm not going to dismantle it but just keep working on understanding basic perspective of forms. Loomis's "Successful Drawing" is about as good as anything for perspective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Some of that works...but most doesn't. It's also a bit complex and misses some understanding of basic perspective fundamentals. I'm not going to dismantle it but just keep working on understanding basic perspective of forms. Loomis's "Successful Drawing" is about as good as anything for perspective.
    Thanks for the tips, I'm definitely going to keep working on basic forms first and get all my basic perspective down :0 And will check out loomis!


    Just tested reversing the bands with the object translated vertically and this is what I came up with (not sure if correct)
    1) Drew object with band pattern to test (top)
    2) Drew the final position I wanted it in (bottom object)
    3) Extended lines from both object's vertices, and found that it didn't matter where the diagonal line went as long as there was a correlation between the two diagonals
    4) Drew lines where the diagonals hit the horizontals, then translated to final object

    Name:  VerticalTest.jpg
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    I think this might be a simple way to do it? Still not 100% tested but will roll with it for now. Going to try the plan drawing when I got more time :s

    Last edited by Raymond Luk; November 4th, 2012 at 08:35 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Luk View Post
    Hey guys, I'm back with a theory I tested :0
    Did one or two tests so not sure if right yet, but what do you think?
    Stop trying to reinvent the wheel and scrap the homegrown theories. Use the readily available, time tested, practical techniques of linear perspective drawing found in books, online resources and suggestions above.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bill618 View Post
    Stop trying to reinvent the wheel and scrap the homegrown theories. Use the readily available, time tested, practical techniques of linear perspective drawing found in books, online resources and suggestions above.
    agree. that lines thing looks epically useless.

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    I know what you're saying, but just a lil scrapped for time as the work is due today @_@ for another project, i'll go back to the basics, but this is epicly due todaay @_@

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    what is due today?

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    My perspective understructure for my objects :0 Did a still life of 4 objects [cone, cylinder, sphere, rec-prism] <- Before
    Now i'm working on the transformation <- After
    Basically, school work ._.

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    So wait...you're in a perspective class? Why isn't the instructor straightening this out for you? And if this is their instruction somehow then I would abandon ship.

    What would Caravaggio do?
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    Understand how to make a true square (circle) in perspective and then you can create an accurate model with measurements.

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    The bottom figures in both of your drawings violate the "90 degree rule."

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    So wait...you're in a perspective class? Why isn't the instructor straightening this out for you? And if this is their instruction somehow then I would abandon ship.
    Ha ha, well he taught us the basic shapes and we go from there :s We learned up to shadows for now, and just spending class time on portfolio stuff for now. uhh I assume this stuff is more advanced so he doesn't teach it (we're in art Fundamentals), and I forgot to email him about it @_@ nuu, if I abandon, my tuition go to waste :s

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Ross View Post
    Understand how to make a true square (circle) in perspective and then you can create an accurate model with measurements.
    A true square based on the circle? Like you mean where 90 degree angels form at any point of the circle? .0. That can be used to measure? :0

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    The bottom figures in both of your drawings violate the "90 degree rule."
    The 90 degree rule? Like, my field of view is too close? o.o

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    The usual statement is that "your VPs are too close together."

    But, if the front corner of your "box" is <90 degrees, you've f'ed up.

    It's like you're trying to write a screenplay in French. But, you're ignorant of French, French grammar, and screenplay format.

    (I hope you're not paying too much per credit for that class you're taking.)

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    There's a bazillion books on perspective....all of them have something to offer...find one and study.

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    Perspective for Comic Book artists. It's not just for comic book artists. Simple. Approaches it in a narrative and straightforward way. That's my suggestion book wise.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=Cfo...page&q&f=false

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    The usual statement is that "your VPs are too close together."

    But, if the front corner of your "box" is <90 degrees, you've f'ed up.

    It's like you're trying to write a screenplay in French. But, you're ignorant of French, French grammar, and screenplay format.

    (I hope you're not paying too much per credit for that class you're taking.)

    Ha ha, but both of those images are examples I used in my theory to illustrate :s
    but mm, i'll keep the 90 rule in mind :0
    (Been more of a refresher for me xD I learn most of my stuff solo, although, they make you practice ellipses mad crazy)

    @Jeff, Thanks for the motivation! I've studied one book and read a few different tutorials, I'll definitely have to start practicing perspective seriously @_@ Until I can build a whole space station, and put a lone human in it with a super foreshortened pose, and then proceed to draw the entire shadow cast by it >
    @JFierce Interesting book xD It's just like reading a comic Humorous and insightful

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Luk View Post
    The 90 degree rule? Like, my field of view is too close? o.o
    It’s not that your viewer-to-subject distance is too close. The problem is the angle of view (field of view) is too wide (large), similar to using a wide angle lens on a camera (without the curvilinear peripheral distortion). The angle or field of view in perspective drawing terminology is called the 'circle (cone) of view' and is usually set, conveniently and effectively, at 90°. When objects extend beyond this circle of view, they become obviously distorted. The angle of view can be reduced to represent the effect of a telephoto lens, reducing the amount of perspective exaggeration, which is useful for work like technical illustration.

    The 90° rule works when the VPs share the same, or close to the same, distance from the viewer’s line of sight along the horizon line.
    When one VP is close to the line of sight mark on the horizon line (e.g. a cube with the front face almost perpendicular to the viewer's line of sight) the distortion becomes apparent when a horizontal square becomes rectangular from front to back (along z depth) opposed to the horizontal rectangularity expected.

    Last edited by bill618; November 6th, 2012 at 06:54 AM.
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    I have a few perspective books and they dont show very much. just the usual box in 1 point 2 point and 3 point perspective. they dont get very technical about it. I purchased Carl Dobsky's perspective download and its the most complete perspective tutorial ive ever come across. Make sure you fully understand his 1 point before moving on to 2 point. there are alot of lines and it can get confusing. The great thing though is if you purchase it you can watch it as many times as you need. You will not find any perspective tutorial as complete as his.

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