Art: Fuck this shit (Illustrator vs Photoshop)
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Thread: Fuck this shit (Illustrator vs Photoshop)

  1. #1
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    Fuck this shit (Illustrator vs Photoshop)

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    YO! So. I'm starting to use Adobe Illustrator for designs, just because it's vector and it gives a "clean" look to the design, when comparing it to Photoshop.

    But here's the deal. My sketches look better in Photoshop, than what they do in Illustrator. They have more feeling & character to them, than what they do in Illustrator. I think a big part of this, is because in my sketches, I have suggestive painting strokes, and that lacks in the Illustrator versions.

    All three of these pictures are supposed to be designs for shirts/posters. How do I get that feeling from my Photoshop sketch, into Illustrator. OR, how do I get a clean design look into Photoshop?

    I've tried the Pentool in PS, I've tried doing my lines in SAI, and now I've tried them in Illustrator. I'm just not getting the character across. Any advice, tips, or crits?

    (I apologize if my dilemma is not clear but I'm just a bit lost).

    (PS. All of the coloured designs were completed in Illustrator, whereas the black and white sketches were done in PS)

    Last edited by Rischmidt; October 24th, 2012 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Because I can.
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  2. #2
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    if the two designs aren't too far out you could always layer your original imagery over top. i think all it needs is a bit of light and shade just to make it pop a bit more, other wise id say add a bit of texture as well but because its going to be on a tshirt id say you wouldn't need to as the weave will come into the imagery once printed. but you can always add it in on the design stages as you can get a better grasp of what the final will look like on a tshirt

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  4. #3
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    I agree with charlottefranks--adding some texture would help, I think. If you're not already aware of Dribbble, it might be worth your while to take a look through. Their members do some amazing work. The technique this designer used might be what you're looking for. If you ask them nicely, I'm sure they'll give you some pointers.

    Best of luck,
    whiskey

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  5. #4
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    Jaslaaik, you waalies and your thread titles.

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  7. #5
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    Great title
    Have you tried varying the stroke width? So you have darker and heavier lines in the shadows?

    "Great job guys! I love you. You're fired."

    Sketchbook! Me vs Anatomy (and other things)
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    You might need to take some time getting used to illustrator, im not a painter by any means but i think for what you're doing it would be easier for you to do your work in PS, then use the pen tool in illustrator to outline everything and do it slowly, in the end vector art will always come out cleaner and more refined but i guess to get things like blur on your strokes and whatnot it would become a lot harder. i prefer to do everything in illustrator, but i think thats because that was what i was taught with. i've seen the things people produce from photoshop and it blows away anything i could come up with, so i couldnt tell you either program is better than the other.

    "War doesn't determine who is , but who is ."
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  9. #7
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    Thanks for the feedback brosifs.
    /bow @ the thread title compliments.

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    Just messed around some, and illustrator has this "Live trace" feature, so I used that and cleaned it up a little bit.

    It's still not really what I want, but it's getting there. @Januz: The line-strokes are a lot more varied = big improvement. @CharlotteFranks: Just quickly applied a low-res fabric texture to see what it looks like. I thought combining Vector + The Photoshop sketch would be great. I could use a clipping mask to sketch over in Photoshop, so in the end the edges would be clean. The thing though is, especially with T-Shirt printing, the amount of colours is crucial. So the problem with 'sketching' / 'painting' in Photoshop is that different shades are created with each stroke, which means you don't just end up with black or whatever other colour, you end up with black, gray, light gray, lighter gray etc; which results in 2324858 colours (over exaggerating, but still).

    @SturdyDesign: Yeah. I like a painterly/sketchy look, but vector just has so many benefits. Maybe my style just isn't for vector. Whatever. I'll give it another go and see if I can come up with something half decent in vector.

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    You should look into comic book forms of shading and vary your line widths. To get the sketch like effect within your color range on lets say the beard of the sailor, add very thin strokes for the pencil marks. I'm not sure how many colors you are working with for the printing to either go a darker shade or black for the shading.

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  12. #9
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    @Elisaevedent: Kindly fuck off.

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  13. #10
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    Well I like your vectors! I think vector art isn't supposed to look like a sketch - it's supposed to look so clean and flat! Do what everyone has suggested and take your vector art into photoshop to add the finishing touches if it's for an illustration. But honestly, I think they look good and quite professional.

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    It is very difficult to capture that freehand look in Illustrator, so I would suggest that you stay with photoshop in regards to sketching.
    I was having a similar discussion with a friend recently, as far as I am aware there is not an alternative to Illustrator that offers more control over freehand work; a package that could offer both the structure of AI and the loose approach you can have with AP would be preferable. The images look good though, and as has been mentioned, textures can help to build on the line work.

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    I used to have this problem a lot and I kind of came up with my own technique. What I do is combine the very neat curves with jagged edges I create by just clicking away in the path. I feel like it adds a lot of texture.

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  16. #13
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    That live trace feature has a lot of knobs you can turn. I still think you probably won't get a great sketchy feel with illustrator without getting very thorough and precise with the pen tool.

    Your work is awesome though by the way.

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