Beginner guy here! Could you some serious criticism!
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    Red face Beginner guy here! Could you some serious criticism!

    Hey guys! So I've just begun doing gesture drawing and stuff using photos from this website and reference: http://artists.pixelovely.com/practi...igure-drawing/
    So right now I don't have much time to go outside and draw actual people due to some work, but i'll be going out there and drawing people behind their backs
    But yeah the gestures last from 30 seconds to 30 minutes, I use the class style on the website
    So yeah I know when i look at my drawing the proportions are all wanky...anyways to the reason why i have this post up here...I NEED SOME SERIOUS CRITICISM! The harsher the better, because I really want to improve and I'm fine if you completely destroy me. I want you guys to tell me where all my flaws are and rub them in my face basically...
    Sorry for the really bad photo quality. I don't own a camera and i'm using the one built in my computer...
    Hopefully the quality is good enough to see what the drawings are of.
    So yeah...commence the criticism!

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    Gestures are not only to make a drawing "more alive" or "flow" as some people may say. They also should be the measuring/proportions phase. So get those large forms down right. It takes time to get good at it. All I can say is practice and more practice. Also, don't become a machine when doing this stuff, really look at whats going on (learn evertime you do it). Good luck on this stuff.

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    Have you studied bone and muscle structure yet? If not you should start. It's always easier to make sense of what you see and draw it accordingly, when you know what's going on under the skin. Right now your arms and shoulders asppear to be...random blob-things. And while you're at it, try to take more time and observe more closely. The first ones are gestures so it's fine to be rough, but the last ones where you tried to add shadows look rushed and completely scribbled :/

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    I agree about learning bone and muscle structures. You may also want to breaking down the figure into primitive forms; that is, do some studies where you think of the human figure as though it were in simple polys, finding the larger surface planes.

    In studying the skeletal system, learn where the bone-surface landmarks are; right now in your gestures you are simply looking at the outline of the form, but critical in drawing the human figure (and drawing in general) is the ability to draw through the figure and think in three dimensions. Try starting your figure drawings by placing the rib cage and building from there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heyriel View Post
    Have you studied bone and muscle structure yet? If not you should start. It's always easier to make sense of what you see and draw it accordingly, when you know what's going on under the skin. Right now your arms and shoulders asppear to be...random blob-things. And while you're at it, try to take more time and observe more closely. The first ones are gestures so it's fine to be rough, but the last ones where you tried to add shadows look rushed and completely scribbled :/
    Yeahh...right now i've just studied a manikin, and thats it. I haven't actually studied muscle or bone sturcutre. I have ab asic understan, just like 8 heads and the body sorta looks like some triangles and so on... You have any books or sources that are good at teach anatomy?

    Quote Originally Posted by Caelan View Post
    I agree about learning bone and muscle structures. You may also want to breaking down the figure into primitive forms; that is, do some studies where you think of the human figure as though it were in simple polys, finding the larger surface planes.

    In studying the skeletal system, learn where the bone-surface landmarks are; right now in your gestures you are simply looking at the outline of the form, but critical in drawing the human figure (and drawing in general) is the ability to draw through the figure and think in three dimensions. Try starting your figure drawings by placing the rib cage and building from there.
    Well just wondering. What would be considered bone-surface landmarks??? Like the joints and ribs?
    Yeah i guess one problem is that i build from head down...I'l try starting with ribs next time and see how that goes.

    Thanks for the criticism guys

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    Yeah, things like the joints, ribs, clavicles, parts of the scapulas, the iliac crest of the hips... much of the skull can be discerned as well.

    I think a lot of people default to putting in the head first, and it makes sense because that is what we look at first as human beings; but it is easier to correctly place the neck and skull from the ribcage than to place the ribcage based on the neck and skull, and you will probably get more static poses if you put the head first.

    To be honest, mannequins aren't great to study from; their points of rotation are not accurate to a human's, and their shapes are generalized in a way that isn't true to the underlying structure of a real person. A lot of people's go-to source when starting out in life drawing are the Andrew Loomis books because they are free online, and they cover some ways to break down the form into primitive shapes. I'm not crazy about some of the ways he does stuff (Such as the way he does hips, and attaching the shoulders to the ribs is kind of clunky,) but it should give you a good springboard to start from.

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    1. Get a scanner.
    2. Study proportions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caelan View Post
    Yeah, things like the joints, ribs, clavicles, parts of the scapulas, the iliac crest of the hips... much of the skull can be discerned as well.

    I think a lot of people default to putting in the head first, and it makes sense because that is what we look at first as human beings; but it is easier to correctly place the neck and skull from the ribcage than to place the ribcage based on the neck and skull, and you will probably get more static poses if you put the head first.

    To be honest, mannequins aren't great to study from; their points of rotation are not accurate to a human's, and their shapes are generalized in a way that isn't true to the underlying structure of a real person. A lot of people's go-to source when starting out in life drawing are the Andrew Loomis books because they are free online, and they cover some ways to break down the form into primitive shapes. I'm not crazy about some of the ways he does stuff (Such as the way he does hips, and attaching the shoulders to the ribs is kind of clunky,) but it should give you a good springboard to start from.
    Cool so what other sources are there? I know i should also be looking at example from real life too, but without a proper understanding of anatomy, most of the stuff i produce will looks weird.

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    Loomis wrote 8 books as far as I know? That should keep you busy for a while xD There's also Burne Hogarth, but I found his books to be a bit too stilized :/
    And you can always find small tuts/charts around the net such as this collection: http://anatomicalart.tumblr.com/post...-links-image-1
    But yeah, Andrew Loomis is a good place to start since he covers pretty much everything.

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