Contrapposto (Level of the knees.)
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    Contrapposto (Level of the knees.)

    So I have a pretty good understanding of what Contrapposto is but one thing that will throw me off every time when I draw is the level of the knees when the hip is tilted to one side and both feet are firmly on the ground. Or if one foot is one the ground and the other leg is on it's toes, or if one leg is straight and the other is bent and both feet are on the ground. I've tried looking at models but it still confuses me. Is there any web source or book out the that explains this mechanic in great detail most articles I read on the topic cover the shoulders and hips counter balancing one another and maybe talk about the head. But I've found nothing in regards to what the legs are doing or more importantly the knees. I usually assume that the knees are always straight if both feet are on the ground but I've come to realize that my lower body proportions always look incorrect so in short. Help!!!

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    Vinicam is offline Five percent inspiration and ninety five percent transpiration. Level 3 Gladiator: Catervarii
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    I'm interested in that too... It's something I struggle a lot to do, and spend a lot of time reworking to get it right.

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    Post some examples of what you're talking about with each example. Otherwise, I'm having trouble visualizing each of those.

    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
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    There is really nothing complicated: the pelvis, upper leg, lower leg, toes and foot are masses that don't change size, so you can construct this part of the pose like a puppet, like Loomis mannikin. So, if you put all your weight on one leg, the pelvis wil tilt so that the other hip joint wil drop, and either that other leg will have to bend or the foot will have to move. The same holds for the entire body: it all sticks together like potatoes and match sticks...

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    if both feet are equally as firm on the ground it aint contrapposto. forget the knees for now... their position is just a consequence. the knee is lower on the non-weight-carrying leg due the pelvis beeing lower there.
    there probably other books on that matter out there, id recommend bridgmans "complete guide to drawing from life". it explains and illustrates the matter of balance to defy gravity really well.

    [edit] eezacque beat me to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    So, if you put all your weight on one leg, the pelvis will tilt so that the other hip joint will drop, and either that other leg will have to bend or the foot will have to move.
    As I was looking for examples of what I was talking about I was staring to realize what you were talking about. That little statement right there helped me a lot thanks.

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