concept art from a 3d artist...
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  1. #1
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    concept art from a 3d artist...

    I am not a concept artist but thought that it would be good practice as far as creating new environments and Ideas for new projects.
    composition and details has always been a weakness for me, trying to find the balance between to much stuff or not enough details
    also trying to paint sharp edges in photoshop but also doing these in a hurry.
    I'm pretty much just looking for any type of feedback or constructive critisism.

    Name:  ship.jpg
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Size:  187.1 KBName:  TmpGiats.jpg
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Size:  127.6 KB

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  2. #2
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    Well an artist is never done learning in my opinion.
    BUT, to be specific with what you are looking for, you need to stop using soft edge brushes / air brushes. It makes things look muddy and fuzzy...everything is muddy and fuzzy in both of these pieces from using soft brushes. I really like the idea's though.

    Textures is the last thing you worry about because you want the work to look right before getting too fancy with it (That is also just a matter of how you go about doing things too i guess.)

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  3. #3
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    The perspective in the first picture is totally off. Look for 1-3point perspective.
    If you're a 3D artist, why not creating 3d models of the environment and use them as reference? I do that sometimes too. Sometimes it's already enormously helpful to have some low-poly models in greyscale just for using it as a guideline on perspective and how light/shadow hits the surfaces.
    Also, did you start out using thumpnails for composition? Did you start out in 3-5 greyscales, blocking them in before getting smoother transitions/detail?

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  4. #4
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    thanks for the feedback, like I said they were sketched out pretty quickly but I will start paying attention to the brush types for now on.

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  5. #5
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    again drew these rather quickly but not sure about the perspective being totally off, the green light was the original vanishing point and the entire structure was built around that single point, so I'm not sure what you mean by being totally off?

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  6. #6
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    Something just makes it super funky.....That computer station is causing a big composition issue, I think that is throwing a lot of it off. I did check your VP and it lines up to that point...but still ...*Squint*

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by orion5175 View Post
    I am not a concept artist but thought that it would be good practice as far as creating new environments and Ideas for new projects.
    composition and details has always been a weakness for me, trying to find the balance between to much stuff or not enough details
    also trying to paint sharp edges in photoshop but also doing these in a hurry.
    I'm pretty much just looking for any type of feedback or constructive critisism.
    Your largest weakness is not composition nor detail, it is as Swamp Thing alludes to, namely perspective thats the problem. Let me illustrate:

    Name:  test.png
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    Now, this image have two problems, the first one is the placement of the viewer since the image is drawn as if you are standing in eye-level with the person but the horizon line and main perspective point is done like your eyes where very low.

    The second problem is more tricky, what you have done is basically drawn a one point perspective when your image is a two point perspective one, thats why the control thing looks wrong. Very tricky to spot though.

    You can find my drawing blog here

    It's mainly a blog about how I develop as an artist, but I post my exercises and how to's on it as well, so if that interests you than take a look.
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  9. #8
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    Yep... that was it. It is a 2 point perspective. This is why I shouldn't do art things at night when I'm tired. The thing to the right shows that it is a 2 point because you have it showing 2 faces and a corner.

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    sorry it took so long to reply this place has conceptart.com listed as an explicite site for some reason, but I see what you are saying about the horizon line and for now on I am going to stay away from the soft brushes.
    with the elipse I drew out a plane and put it as a foreshorting to match the pers. lines.
    does the horizon line always have to be in the general center of the image?

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  11. #10
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    Well, strictly speaken, our own human eyes always see everything through a vansihing point that stays exactly in the mid (and so the horizonal line), but we don't draw pictures in the sizes that we have given through our human eyes too, so it's not a must at all to draw the horizonal line in mid.

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  12. #11
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    I see what you are saying, the point of view of the person most of the time will be right in front of them depending on where they are looking.

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  13. #12
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    but also doing these in a hurry.
    Why would you want to do that?

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

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  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by orion5175 View Post
    with the elipse I drew out a plane and put it as a foreshorting to match the pers. lines.
    Okey, elipses are... tricky. I would do a couple of exercises for those if I where you (if you don't know any I have a couple).


    Quote Originally Posted by orion5175 View Post
    does the horizon line always have to be in the general center of the image?
    As SwampThing alluded to, no, It can be anywhere in the image, even outside of it or at an angle. However in this image you made things human-size, and that together with having a low horizon-line suggest that the viewer are situated low in the image and I think that the image would benefit from the viewer being a tad bit higher, for a number of reasons. Take the console as an example, at a higher angle you would see a lot more of the inside of the "control-room". You would also see a lot more of the outside structures, which could be nice.

    Simply put, choose the horizon-line and perspective point that shows off what you are trying to convey best.

    You can find my drawing blog here

    It's mainly a blog about how I develop as an artist, but I post my exercises and how to's on it as well, so if that interests you than take a look.
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