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Thread: Learning environments, help needed :)

  1. #1
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    Red face Learning environments, help needed :)

    So I'm trying to learn how to draw environments, and was planning on taking baby steps...and this turned out to be a not so baby step. XD I was wondering whether I could get some feedback on this? It seems so empty and boring at the moment...and that burial mound...just looks like a lump of pudding. DX I guess I'm trying to switch it up with textures and brushes for this, but I'm having a bit of trouble.

    I was also thinking of just starting over and changing the perspective of it anyways, to a more...ground level view? I just feel like this ain't cutting it. What do you think?

    So I guess I'll be posting whatever environments/updates I do in here from now on?
    Thanks!
    Last edited by MeganMissfit; August 19th, 2012 at 06:13 AM.
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    What was your ref for this?
    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt
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    Hi MeganMissfit, I'd leave this one and do some more. Working on compositions in thumbnails will help a lot. Composition is the biggest issue I see. Usually having a horizon line split right down the middle dividing the image into two equal halves isn't the best. If the light shining down on the sword is coming from the sky it might look good to show those kind of light rays breaking through the clouds in the distance. This could also help introduce some diagonals into your composition.
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    Hello....was just browing and saw an excuse to do a quick landscape.
    I agree with the others, more practice in composition at a smaller scale would probably help you to play with perspective and make the image more dynamic and interesting.

    The main thing I noticed besides composition, was a lack of depth in colour. Most of your image is muddy brown. Don't be afraid to use colour, but do a lot of reference studies from life and from photos to really start to understand colour

    I did a quick paintover

    Couple of tips for landscapes:
    • use value to show depth. (lighter in general with distance, darker up close)
    • Interchange dark against light to show overlap and also imply depth (dark trees against light sky, bright river against dark landscape etc)
    • You can make the sky a feature as well and use cloud forms to help the composition (cloud forms sweep towards the sword)
    • Things get smaller in the distance so repeat similar things at different scales (trees, cloud layers, mountains etc)
    • Use colour to imply depth (cooler colours recede, warmer colours come forward)
    • Shadows generally should always contains some element of the light colour in it even if it's a small amount, this will add vibrancy to them


    hope that helps!
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    Hey guys, so sorry for the late reply!

    Tinybird: I used multiple refs for this. Here are some of them!
    http://bmvgallery.com/wp-content/upl...ow-Clouds1.jpg
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/seaniep/2237953001/
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...k_-_135593.jpg

    Derra: Thank you! May I ask, what kind of studies can I do for composition? Like, how do you study composition anyway? I feel like it's such an intuitive thing. Or is it just a matter of doing a bunch of thumbnails until you get something that you like?

    monkeybread: I actually was going for a really moody scene, hence the muddy colors. Do you think I still be able to achieve that with more vibrant colors? And thanks for the tips!

    And FML, that wasn't supposed to be a sword, just a sad, lonely cross made with two sticks tied together. Whoops >.<

    I'll post an update when I get the chance
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeganMissfit View Post
    May I ask, what kind of studies can I do for composition? Like, how do you study composition anyway? I feel like it's such an intuitive thing. Or is it just a matter of doing a bunch of thumbnails until you get something that you like?
    Handy comp overview: http://www.cgsociety.org/index.php/C...ition_tutorial

    The next link is a huge bunch of useful fundamentals as well as process shots on one page that I think mostly has very useful things worth looking through:http://www.floobynooby.com/ICG/artvalues.html

    and yes do lots of small thumbnails using only value first (grayscale) to test your comps. Once you pick a couple you like if undecided you can put a tad bit more detail in there to get a better sense of things, but generally if you nail your comp in thumbnail stage you'll mostly only have to worry about resolving and rendering things out.

    Quote Originally Posted by MeganMissfit View Post
    I actually was going for a really moody scene, hence the muddy colors. Do you think I still be able to achieve that with more vibrant colors?
    Of course. I would argue you couldn't do it WITH muddy colours. In fact I'm not sure when muddy colours are a desireable thing! Moody doesn't mean drab. While you might choose to limit the saturation of your colours and have a somewhat simpler palette, this shouldn't restrict you from using a range of hues, as exists in nature. I haven't come across many landscapes that are all just brown
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    Hi, sorry if reviving dead threads is not allowed here, but I decided to re-do this completely. I did take into consideration composition this time, but something still seems not quite right. It still looks a bit muddy to me as well, especially the water (yes, that's supposed to be water XDDD) and the lights seem a bit...off? should i make them less bright, especially for the ones over the water?

    Any tips on painting water? Like the texture?

    Reference: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lsuzaphotos/6202165915/

    Name:  Screen shot 2012-10-25 at 11.12.53 PM.png
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