Orange Streak in Outdoor Shadows???
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Orange Streak in Outdoor Shadows???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Manila, Philippines!!
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Orange Streak in Outdoor Shadows???

    Hey guys,

    I'm not really sure if this has been discussed before but can anyone kindly explain the existence of these orange streaks at the edge of these shadows?

    I understand that the shadows from these outdoor paintings are cooler because of the secondary light source from the sky, but I don't have any idea where these orange streaks come from.


    Name:  131.jpg
Views: 461
Size:  28.2 KB
    Name:  Mailbox.jpg
Views: 433
Size:  62.4 KB
    Name:  Portos___Day_by_thegryph.jpg
Views: 453
Size:  104.8 KB


    I tried searching blogs and the forums for this topic but I can't find anything related.My research has been pretty hopeless, I hope someone might give an explanation. It's really been bugging me for months.

    In need of crticisms...

    Drop by my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,648
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,878 Times in 2,354 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well, there can be a couple of reasons; one is subsurface scattering where light is passing through a translucent object, the other is atmospheric, where again the light is passing through dust and particles in the atmosphere causing a similar effect. The atmospheric effect happens on smoky days or dusty days usually when the sun is low in the sky and the light is passing through more of the atmosphere. Painters use the effect to brighten the feeling of light in their paintings. Another effect is the greatest amount of hue and saturation of a form is in the halftone near where the light transitions to shadow and some painters like to over emphasize that effect to turn the form.

    Of course its overuse is also common because someone is told it could happen and then includes it in every painting they ever make whether its appropriate or not. Also a lot of painters tone their under paintings with a warm middle tone to get rid of the white of the canvas letting it peek through to unify the painting. And then there are Hensche students that just paint formulaic candy colored crap most of the time because he taught them to and start by toning their canvas cad red.

    My advice is paint things the way you observe them when outdoor painting, until you have a reason to exaggerate them for a specific idea you have for the image.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Self-conscious stylistic fillip.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    810
    Thanks
    187
    Thanked 1,366 Times in 319 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Could also be from working from photographs where the colour of the sunlight is desaturated in the fully-lit areas due to overexposure.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to briggsy@ashtons For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Manila, Philippines!!
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Well, there can be a couple of reasons; one is subsurface scattering where light is passing through a translucent object, the other is atmospheric, where again the light is passing through dust and particles in the atmosphere causing a similar effect. The atmospheric effect happens on smoky days or dusty days usually when the sun is low in the sky and the light is passing through more of the atmosphere. Painters use the effect to brighten the feeling of light in their paintings. Another effect is the greatest amount of hue and saturation of a form is in the halftone near where the light transitions to shadow and some painters like to over emphasize that effect to turn the form.

    Of course its overuse is also common because someone is told it could happen and then includes it in every painting they ever make whether its appropriate or not. Also a lot of painters tone their under paintings with a warm middle tone to get rid of the white of the canvas letting it peek through to unify the painting. And then there are Hensche students that just paint formulaic candy colored crap most of the time because he taught them to and start by toning their canvas cad red.

    My advice is paint things the way you observe them when outdoor painting, until you have a reason to exaggerate them for a specific idea you have for the image.
    Thanks! That cleared up a lot of things. Due to my frustrations I just considered it to be like the penumbra of your typical cast shadow but with a different hue.
    But what bothers me the most is why does it only appear around the edges of the cast shadows?

    In need of crticisms...

    Drop by my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Manila, Philippines!!
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by briggsy@ashtons View Post
    Could also be from working from photographs where the colour of the sunlight is desaturated in the fully-lit areas due to overexposure.
    Maybe that's why I can't seem to remember If I've really observed these things in real life or not. I gotta go outside and observe more often

    In need of crticisms...

    Drop by my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Manila, Philippines!!
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Self-conscious stylistic fillip.
    What do you mean by that?

    In need of crticisms...

    Drop by my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,648
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,878 Times in 2,354 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You can see it is an affectation of the artist in the second and third images. The second image the orange effect is darker than the core shadow because the artist failed to see its value correctly, instead they focused on its hue and chroma; and in the third image where the effect, seemingly caused by sunlight and therefore global, is only on the right side of the image and not the left. Elwell's assessment of Self-conscious stylistic fillip is right on.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Manila, Philippines!!
    Posts
    29
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the answers everyone!

    In need of crticisms...

    Drop by my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #10
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This effect or phenomenon of light is called "halation"...which is simply the bleeding over of one color into another or the brighter values into the dark. It's most noticable with shadow edges in really humid, smoky or dusty conditions where the light bounces through so much particulate material it is softened and scattered.

    Other halation effects exist as well such as when you look through leaves or branches toward the sun.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,198 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    For what it's worth, wearing glasses and/or having some vision problems could also produce a similar effect... I see thin lines of zingy bright color at the edges of things all the time, most noticeably along edges of high contrast (like a dark building against a bright sky.) When I see them, they're hairline thin, and usually electric blue or orange but might be other colors. I suppose some people might see thicker lines, or maybe they just go in for exaggeration...

    (I think it's mostly because of my glasses, but it's hard to compare with and without glasses... Without my glasses I just see blur.)

    With migraine aura I see crazy psychedelic colors and lights all over everything. If I painted that exactly the way I see it, nobody would believe it was accurate.

    Oh man, I should totally paint in aura mode now...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #12
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yes, what you're seeing is from your glasses, it's chromatic aberration, the bane of lensmakers everywhere.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,555 Times in 607 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ah, so that's what it's called.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    810
    Thanks
    187
    Thanked 1,366 Times in 319 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    These photos show the common photographic artifact that seems to have inspired this particular "stylistic fillip". The orange streaks here are not physical phenomena and were not at all visible at the time; they are purely the result of overexposure in the fully lit areas, causing desaturation of the afternoon sunlight colour compared to the penumbral regions. The pairs of details were taken seconds apart, with identical settings except for exposure.

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to briggsy@ashtons For This Useful Post:


  22. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 497 Times in 270 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    For what it's worth, wearing glasses and/or having some vision problems could also produce a similar effect... I see thin lines of zingy bright color at the edges of things all the time, most noticeably along edges of high contrast (like a dark building against a bright sky.) When I see them, they're hairline thin, and usually electric blue or orange but might be other colors. I suppose some people might see thicker lines, or maybe they just go in for exaggeration...

    (I think it's mostly because of my glasses, but it's hard to compare with and without glasses... Without my glasses I just see blur.)
    Ugh. I don't miss that! (the blur or the chromatic aberration) Or how if I looked left greens would shift with the direction, and reds would move in the opposite direction...so strange hot pinks against bright blues were bad too. (I recommend Lazers, QG. LAZERS IN YOUR EYE.)

    Anyway, some awesome responses!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,555 Times in 607 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    (I recommend Lazers, QG. LAZERS IN YOUR EYE.)
    This guy would disagree.



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #17
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The variety of effects you see outdoors is endless.

    The way in which bad artists misunderstand these effects and botch them on canvas is also quite impressive.

    Light often blanches out color where it most directly hits, leaving the midtones less blanched and more locally colored.

    On hot humid days you can get more refraction in the air which leads to some strange color effects where light meets shadow, or where shadow doesn't have a sharp edge, etc.

    Go outside every day and observe what interests you, and learn to trust your eyes only. See the world for yourself.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  26. #18
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    The variety of effects you see outdoors is endless.

    The way in which bad artists misunderstand these effects and botch them on canvas is also quite impressive.

    Light often blanches out color where it most directly hits, leaving the midtones less blanched and more locally colored.

    On hot humid days you can get more refraction in the air which leads to some strange color effects where light meets shadow, or where shadow doesn't have a sharp edge, etc.

    Go outside every day and observe what interests you, and learn to trust your eyes only. See the world for yourself.
    Fuck. Yes.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •