Art: Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

    Hey there! Name's Rachael, age's 18 and my dream is to become an animator someday.

    Why is this a dream? I've been drawing my whole life, and a year and a half ago I decided that I wanted to become an animator, but my parents want me to study medicine and there's no way they'll be paying art classes for me. They just think that it's not worth anything and that I won't get anywhere with my drawings.

    Now I'm saving money to pay the art college myself, but it's VERY expensive and I'll have to wait some years to make my dream come true...

    So I'm here to keep improving and not to give up, and hopefully, get a better level in my drawings.

    I'll appreciate any kind of help, really!!!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Some drawings of mine are in this blog: misscafeine.tumblr.com

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,557 Times in 608 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Er...I think you might have put this in the wrong section, but whatever.

    I think everyone would recommend this book to start off for anyone interested in animation.

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

    And then this book for anyone interested in representational drawing, period.

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Psychotime For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thank you so much! I'll try to get them

    Also, you said I opened my thread in a wrong place, where should I do it? I'm really sorry, I'm still learning how this site works

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    109
    Thanks
    59
    Thanked 34 Times in 31 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Oh hey, I follow you on Tumblr. I think what Psychotime means is if you're looking for critiques/advice on your sketches you should post a thread on the Sketchbooks forum. Upload, get crits, and maybe you'll be ready to get some scholarships to help you pay! Hope to see your work on here soon.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to jinny For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 497 Times in 270 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Caféine View Post
    Hey there! Name's Rachael, age's 18 and my dream is to become an animator someday.

    Why is this a dream? I've been drawing my whole life, and a year and a half ago I decided that I wanted to become an animator, but my parents want me to study medicine and there's no way they'll be paying art classes for me. They just think that it's not worth anything and that I won't get anywhere with my drawings.

    Now I'm saving money to pay the art college myself, but it's VERY expensive and I'll have to wait some years to make my dream come true...

    So I'm here to keep improving and not to give up, and hopefully, get a better level in my drawings.

    I'll appreciate any kind of help, really!!!
    So young! You have plenty of time. (There are quite a few people who went back to study and didn't start working professionally until their 30's.) First, just be aware the animation industry does not require a degree for a job - but skills. So you don't NEED to attend an expensive art school.

    That being said it's not a bad idea to work for a few years - not only will you save money for school, you can work on a portfolio to increase your chances of a scholarship. I would encourage you to try and find a local life-drawing class; sometimes they can be at a local community college, or even a museum or community center. Take an acting class! Animation is about performing!

    I'd highly recommend the Drawn To Life books from Walt Stanchfield; he talks about the kind of gesture drawing that is really important to know in the animation industry. You might also be interested in looking up artist blogs like Mark Kennedy - http://sevencamels.blogspot.com/ Oh! you'd probably enjoy the animation podcast too! http://animationpodcast.com/

    Also, if your parents are concerned that being in animation doesn't pay anything, you might want to have them look at the Animation guild website - it lists the wages for various positions. Animationguild.org

    Granted, that's US-centric - And mostly Southern California centric - I don't have info for other areas.

    That being said it's like any other craft; it takes a lot of time to build up your skills - and there are a lot of people that want to do it who never develop to a professional level.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Alice Herring For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    Er...I think you might have put this in the wrong section, but whatever.

    I think everyone would recommend this book to start off for anyone interested in animation.

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

    And then this book for anyone interested in representational drawing, period.

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.
    looks good

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Jinny: Oh sweet! Thank you so much! Then, should I erase this thread?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    So young! You have plenty of time. (There are quite a few people who went back to study and didn't start working professionally until their 30's.) First, just be aware the animation industry does not require a degree for a job - but skills. So you don't NEED to attend an expensive art school.

    That being said it's not a bad idea to work for a few years - not only will you save money for school, you can work on a portfolio to increase your chances of a scholarship. I would encourage you to try and find a local life-drawing class; sometimes they can be at a local community college, or even a museum or community center. Take an acting class! Animation is about performing!

    I'd highly recommend the Drawn To Life books from Walt Stanchfield; he talks about the kind of gesture drawing that is really important to know in the animation industry. You might also be interested in looking up artist blogs like Mark Kennedy - http://sevencamels.blogspot.com/ Oh! you'd probably enjoy the animation podcast too! http://animationpodcast.com/

    Also, if your parents are concerned that being in animation doesn't pay anything, you might want to have them look at the Animation guild website - it lists the wages for various positions. Animationguild.org

    Granted, that's US-centric - And mostly Southern California centric - I don't have info for other areas.

    That being said it's like any other craft; it takes a lot of time to build up your skills - and there are a lot of people that want to do it who never develop to a professional level.
    Alice: THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE INFORMATION!!!! Yes! I wanted to take performance classes this year, I know they're important. Thank you again! I have no words to express my gratitude towards you!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    723
    Thanks
    490
    Thanked 210 Times in 180 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Caféine View Post
    Jinny: Oh sweet! Thank you so much! Then, should I erase this thread?
    Don't erase the thread it's full of useful info.
    I think what he meant was, perhaps it would be a good idea to start a thread in the sketchbook section, and start posting all your drawing practice there for everyone to critique. There aren't many animators there but you could still post your animation practice there too. And for help with specific animation stuff, you can post that in one of the animation subsections.

    I wanted to become an animator for a while, ended up realising it wasn't what I wanted, but I can testify that all the info that Alice gave you is spot on and very worthwhile taking

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The Animator's Survival Kit is of course awesome, but I hadn't heard of that other book--it looks great! thanks for sharing!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,378
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 457 Times in 322 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    I think everyone would recommend this book to start off for anyone interested in animation.

    Open a new thread, they said. You will improve, they said.

    It is an excellent book, but for beginners I suggest Preston Blair or Eric Goldberg

    Grinnikend door het leven...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southernest Country of America
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think you should check the Johnk K's blog, it's like university for animators: http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com
    It may not be the easiest thing to navigate throught it but it's the single most useful place to start and it's full of nice surprises.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook