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    Help

    Edit:

    All sorted, some of you guys sure get upset when people question their own abilities.

    Don't like it, move on. :p

    Last edited by Althyye; September 22nd, 2012 at 05:24 PM.
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    You get good at art by actually doing art. Go through reams of paper learning to draw. Work from life work, from photos, but practice always. When you get stuck, focus on that problem until you overcome it, too much reading and theory won't help you as much as drawing and painting. It will take you at least five years if you work hard, eight hours a day; more likely it will take you ten years or more to get good enough to get a job in the industry.

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    18 is hardly a late bloomer. There is some propaganda out there that says people are pros in their teens. Forget about it. School is not a bad direction, if your parents are paying, when you take advantage of what it gives you but take the responsibility of learning on yourself. In any case take the responsibility on yourself! If you learn to draw really well, like Armand says, all of those other things will start to make more sense and fall into place.

    No matter the setting take responsibility and make a million drawings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Althyye View Post
    Hi there, wondering if people can help. (:

    However, since January I've completely gone off of it, I find it way too technical now. I never had much interest in it other than thinking it was somewhat cool at the time.


    Just make sure that what your feeling now isn't this once more. Arts technical whether it's 2D or 3D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bcarman View Post
    18 is hardly a late bloomer. There is some propaganda out there that says people are pros in their teens. Forget about it. School is not a bad direction, if your parents are paying, when you take advantage of what it gives you but take the responsibility of learning on yourself. In any case take the responsibility on yourself! If you learn to draw really well, like Armand says, all of those other things will start to make more sense and fall into place.

    No matter the setting take responsibility and make a million drawings.
    Quote Originally Posted by JFierce View Post
    Just make sure that what your feeling now isn't this once more. Arts technical whether it's 2D or 3D.
    Thanks dpaint and bcarman.

    @JFierce I'm pretty much 100% certain now.

    3D stuff isn't very forgiving... in the sense that it's so annoying based on a set on a strict set of rules and guidelines. I know 2D stuff is too in terms of perspective and colour and so on, but there's much more leeway in painting, if that kinda makes sense... I know there's zbrush and mudbox, but meh, you can be much more creative with 2D definitely! Additionally, I didn't like the fact I was taking someone elses idea and building it, I like designing my own stuff.

    Concept art, yes I find what others make and my end products to a certain extent, cool. But it's the process from me, getting my visual idea onto canvas is what I find exciting. ^^

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    You get good at art by actually doing art. Go through reams of paper learning to draw. Work from life work, from photos, but practice always. When you get stuck, focus on that problem until you overcome it, too much reading and theory won't help you as much as drawing and painting. It will take you at least five years if you work hard, eight hours a day; more likely it will take you ten years or more to get good enough to get a job in the industry.
    Same boat as ya Althyye ... There is so much to take in.
    dpaint, thanks. It always helps to hear that again, and trying to follow it everyday. Focusing on smaller things one by one...
    and
    Quote Originally Posted by bcarman View Post
    18 is hardly a late bloomer. There is some propaganda out there that says people are pros in their teens. Forget about it.
    yayyy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    If it's one of the Art Institute Of_______ I'd say yer really fucked. .
    Make sure you clarify, because there are some schools with the name Art Institute of X that aren't affiliated with those people in any way.

    Speaking of which, how did that issue turn out with them? The one about them owing the government a few billion or so dollars due to fraud?

    Last edited by Psychotime; August 10th, 2012 at 09:04 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    Make sure you clarify, because there are some schools with the name Art Institute of X that aren't affiliated with those people in any way.

    Speaking of which, how did that issue turn out with them? The one about them owing the government a few billion or so dollars due to fraud?
    Well. . .

    If your "qualifications" as an art student involve your parents having a decent credit score--- caveat emptor. . .

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    What's this? Oh, just another post from a TEENAGER claiming they are starting late or behind. It boggles the mind.

    You're 18. That's extremely young, and in fact gives you a head start over all of the *actual* late bloomers. Make the most of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    Speaking of which, how did that issue turn out with them? The one about them owing the government a few billion or so dollars due to fraud?
    Still ongoing and looks like it's also political? Not sure of the reputation of this source http://www.alternet.org/story/155073...olitical_elite

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    Quote Originally Posted by Althyye View Post
    I have the imagination, ideas and concepts, but whatever I put on canvas is really awful (I know I'm not the one to decide), my technical ability is lacking heavily and I can't see myself improving although I'm practicing lots. Please help if you can spare some time.

    Thanks!

    Please excuse grammer/spelling errors.
    We've all been where you are in terms of skills. Artistic competence doesn't appear from a vacuum; people study very hard for it. (In this case the majority of study = drawing/painting.) A year is actually very little drawing time, especially if the program is heavily 3D. (for the record I can't handle modeling 3D either - gives me stress nightmares involving moving vertices.)

    You have to give yourself permission to fail at drawing and painting. It's going to happen. It's going to happen a lot. But that's okay - it's how you learn. It even happens at the professional level. It just means it happens a little less often, and you will have the tools to correct it. Go to museums - don't just look at the paintings, but do little thumbnail studies. Watch good movies. Read good stories. Put good things in your brain - it's all source material! Go out and meet interesting people and do interesting things. Sometimes something won't work because you took a risk - and that's a good thing. So jump feet first! Keep a sketchbook on you to draw what you see, and what you imagine. Post drawings in a sketchbook or fine arts thread. Maybe every couple of hundred drawings or so ask if someone can look them over. Start projects you're interested in doing for fun, too. Remember why you want to do art, even when you're on your 100th hand study

    Edit: good lord. I have possibly indulged in too much sugar.

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    As mentioned before get a lot of experience actually putting pencil to paper. You learn from your mistakes when you make them while actually producing art, it is both valuable and necessary for achieving your goals.

    Try to become proficient in several skills though. Your education in 3d design, especially things as texture artist, rigger, or something like that, could go a long way in getting your foot in the door of a studio as a professional. The market is saturated with "concept artists", and many places that make use of concept artists have limited budgets and need people who are multi-disciplined. People don't often think of the non glamorous jobs like that aforementioned, and so studios are often lacking of people who are experienced in those fields.

    Becoming proficient in one of those fields, or some of the other areas of production art that are not as glamorous as "concept artist" may be what gets you in the industry,but all the while keep developing your 2d art as well, and once you have established yourself as a trustworthy and skillful artist then try to move into a design position.

    Being skilled in multiple disciplines in the industry of your choice is always the best way to get work within that industry, even if the work you get isn't your immediate preference. All of that experience goes to the same place, and is invaluable and with a little extrapolation skills in other areas of design and production art can be applied to your craft of choice.

    But to reiterate, and it is very important to remember, you must produce a lot of work now, and develop your fundamental skills as a 2d artist if you want to have strong results.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sepulverture View Post
    As mentioned before get a lot of experience actually putting pencil to paper. You learn from your mistakes when you make them while actually producing art, it is both valuable and necessary for achieving your goals.
    see, you say that, which I think is totally awesome. And then you go on to say this:


    Quote Originally Posted by Sepulverture View Post
    Being skilled in multiple disciplines in the industry of your choice is always the best way to get work within that industry, even if the work you get isn't your immediate preference.
    Which I disagree with! Yes, it works for some people - but not for others. If it means you're going to be mediocre in multiple areas instead of competent in one, I can't see how it can be a good choice. The skills of modelling and rigging are different enough from traditional drawing/painting/design skills that it IS a split in attention. This is *exactly* why I choose to focus on one area when I was studying. I also don't see the point of encouraging someone to follow an educational path that they don't even *like* if it's not necessary. Besides, even just following the traditional path is going to open up a variety of production art jobs besides concept artist.

    And is the market really saturated with concept artists? or just a lot of people who want to be concept artists?

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    But from right now to the time of getting a job placement
    Let me guess....Art Institute?

    You will never be "placed" in any sort of good job from there (or anywhere) unless your skills are up to or above par. And even the case of being exceptional, a place such as the Art Institute places 1 student into temporary "crunch" contract work and is promptly let go once the studio has filled it's milestone. Then they can tell you at the beginning of enrollment that they have a "JOB PLACEMENT PROGRAM!".

    It is not something you should EVER expect. Professional, highly skilled artists have a hard time getting work at the moment. Expecting "job placement" is, unfortunately, wishful thinking.

    I know, because I went through it. A different discipline, but I still went through it. "Oh yeah, we'll place ya after ya graduate! And we'll tell you all the job hunting skills you need in a class during your final quarter!".

    Bullshit and bullshit. They just called me once a month after graduation to see how MY search was going. Then when I had a contact, they added it to their file. After 6 months, I never heard from them again.

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    I know how you feel, those old master guys are pretty good.

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