Working on my realism, would like some feedback.

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  1. #1
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    Working on my realism, would like some feedback.

    I've been working on more realistic facial proportions lately, to get myself in the habit of working with realism and semi-realism. Here's my most recent one:
    Working on my realism, would like some feedback.

    What do I need to fix, and where am I on the right track?

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    The eyes and eyebrows are too high up on the forehead. (And, FYI, the shoulders are way too narrow for any human.)

    If you're going to go the "mathematically constructed" route for drawing the human head, you need to be a *lot* more rigorous about applying the canons. Drawing a not-quite circle that's five eyes wide and then eyeballing the rest and expecting it to come out right is probably worse practice in the long term than not measuring at all. I'd suggest you get a copy of Jack Hamm's "Drawing the Head and Figure" (it's cheap, maybe $5 on Amazon) and do the "double circle" construction exercise on pages 2-3, using a compass and a ruler-- until you can do it from memory. The point is to measure until you've internalized the proportions in your head.

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    Draw a looot of real human faces from reference (And real life! You also have a face!) and apply knowledge of proportion from Loomis, Jack Hamm (as mentioned above), etc... to them. You're not gonna be able to draw a super realistic portrait without reference until you're like, The Best Artist(tm), so it takes a lot of practice.


    We are cups, constantly and quietly being filled. The trick is, knowing how to tip ourselves over and let the beautiful stuff out.
    - Ray Bradbury
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giacomo View Post
    The eyes and eyebrows are too high up on the forehead. (And, FYI, the shoulders are way too narrow for any human.)

    If you're going to go the "mathematically constructed" route for drawing the human head, you need to be a *lot* more rigorous about applying the canons. Drawing a not-quite circle that's five eyes wide and then eyeballing the rest and expecting it to come out right is probably worse practice in the long term than not measuring at all. I'd suggest you get a copy of Jack Hamm's "Drawing the Head and Figure" (it's cheap, maybe $5 on Amazon) and do the "double circle" construction exercise on pages 2-3, using a compass and a ruler-- until you can do it from memory. The point is to measure until you've internalized the proportions in your head.
    Yeah, erring on the side of narrowness is something of a problem I've noticed with my shoulders. I'll try harder to work on that.

    I'll take a look at that book you recommended. It looks fascinating. Although I do have a tendency to get way too obsessive over getting measurements perfect (as in, to the exact tenth of a millimeter perfect) so I'm kind of worried about the ruler... I'll try out the compass thing though.

    Edit: This. Book. Is. Amazing. Thank you so much for the recommendation!

    Last edited by devyni; August 8th, 2012 at 03:11 PM. Reason: See above.
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlebones View Post
    Draw a looot of real human faces from reference (And real life! You also have a face!) and apply knowledge of proportion from Loomis, Jack Hamm (as mentioned above), etc... to them. You're not gonna be able to draw a super realistic portrait without reference until you're like, The Best Artist(tm), so it takes a lot of practice.
    Yeah, I admit that I was kind of working from general proportions on that one. I tried doing this one from life. Is is any better? (It's of my sister, and she did say I could put it up.)

    Working on my realism, would like some feedback.

    Last edited by devyni; August 7th, 2012 at 09:12 PM. Reason: (Didn't realize the picture was so big, sorry!)
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    devyni,

    WOW! The drawing of your sister clearly demonstrates that you know your proportions, and that you have a great ability for drawing nuance and subtlety. So many people simply CANNOT operate on this level. Very nice.

    I have a suggestion I give to lots of people, regarding furthering their drawing skills. For you specifically, you're looking to be more realistic in your drawing. My suggestion applies to you too, I think:

    I suggest you take a sketchbook with you wherever you go. Sketch all the time, ONLY IN INK. This way, you'll see all your mistakes. Since you don't want to make any mistakes, working in ink will force you to try to get things right the first time, to be deliberate with your linework.

    Now, pick the most complex environments you can to practice your ink drawings with. Your living room, kitchen, bathroom, in a restaurant, parking lot, shopping mall, museum, park... whatever works. It will drive you batshit, but after a while you'll be able to get an instinct for how to represent dimensional environments, along with being able to represent the true character of the people you're sketching. It will force you to draw dimensional objects in the right place, so you can put all the other dimensional elements (chairs, cups, lamps, whatever) in all the other right places, done right the very first time you put ink pen to paper.

    If you wish to do more complete sketches/illustrations that have shadows and dark values, why not use a brush pen to dimensionalize your sketches?

    This is (for artists) like going to the gym. These are your exercises, working those muscles you aren't used to dealing with. But once you get good at it, then you'll be an athlete.

    Okay, crappy metaphor, but you get my point, yes?
    Hope that helps.

    Good luck!

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