Portrait help
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  1. #1
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    Portrait help

    So, I've never attempted a self portrait from a photo let alone from a mirror. I feel like I should have at least a few under my belt.
    This would be via mirror, I just feel a little lost on how to give it more...oomph?
    Any crits and/or suggestions would be very much appreciated.

    EDIT:
    Ohmygoshthatthumbnail>_<

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    Last edited by Trishlish; August 7th, 2012 at 11:43 AM.
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    Like with everything else, faces are constructed of light and shadow, and recognized by where light hits. I'd recommend to start rendering in black and white. For now, just concentrate on the planes that form your face. It's good to understand how skin and flesh forms around your skull, for realizing how planes are formed. You big advantage is, you can study your face in front of the mirror to find out about this. If you just draw from a photo, most forms and shapes are guessed, limited to what you might find out through the reference you work from.

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    maybe you have teo see what you want do achieve with this image. If you aim to the fine art, maybe you could try with traditional medium.

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=6938

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    Yes, the one thing missing from here is the values.

    Actually, this flat treatment does look like a particular illustrative style; but for more "oomph", as you say, values and contrast are ones of the most basic things that you could use.

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    Thanks so much for all the advice!

    @ SwampThing: I'm thinking of scrapping this one after I mess with it a tad, then call it a learning experience and try it out in black & white and see if I can translate that into color another time.

    @ Danilo: I'm not sure what I want to achieve other than a believable and eye pleasing portrait. Head anatomy is challenging for me and I'm trying to be less dependent on photo references. Live models aren't available for me, so I figured using my own noggin would be good practice (:> I might try a traditional route, I've never used paints, but I do love charcoal.
    Also, that man is amazing. Apparently he's done 1000 of those portraits.
    Mind. Blown.

    @ Arenaus: I've always had such trouble conveying value in color. It always ends up looking muddy or much too dark, which is why I seem to avoid it, subconsciously or not. Which is silly, I'll definitely attempt to contrast this up when I get home. Thanks again! Feedback means a lot to me.

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    well for that task I think you going pretty well right now. the values are right for a dim light atmosphere,

    I was saying traditional techniques because painting like this could have certain value if done traditionally.
    even few nice brush strokes with real paint can be finished work, that can't be sad for digital.
    Thats why I cant see how you can go further on this piece.

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    Danilo - Good point I don't have paints, but I'll drag out my charcoals sometime this week.

    B&W was more challenging than I thought.
    I need better lighting, my room is too dim, I think.

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    That looks better. Next time shine a desk lamp on the side of your face, you'll get some nice lighting variation that way.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

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